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The Leading Cause Of The Recent Linux Kernel Power Problems

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  • It seems that the Arch Linux people found a solution to this problem before Michael:
    They should get some of the advertising revenue

    For me, a BIOS update actually made things worse on my laptop (HP dv6-3210us, RadeonHD42x0). Now, even with the force flag, I get the dreaded:
    Code:
    [    0.142500] Unable to assume _OSC PCIe control. Disabling ASPM
    sigh..

    Comment


    • Do you still get a writable policy file?

      Originally posted by DanL View Post
      Now, even with the force flag, I get the dreaded:
      Code:
      [    0.142500] Unable to assume _OSC PCIe control. Disabling ASPM
      sigh..
      I get the above message about _OSC PCIe control too, but I am still able to set the following:

      Code:
      $ cat /sys/module/pcie_aspm/parameters/policy
      default performance [powersave]
      Doesn't the /sys filesystem have the final say in whether Linux has activated something or not?

      Comment


      • The Windows way according to a comment on heise.de

        http://www.heise.de/open/news/foren/...20449341/read/

        Translated:
        Normally Windows activates ASPM, when Root Complex (Chipset) and Endpoint (PCIe-card) in ConfigSpace indicate that they support the L0s and L1 energy saving mode. Windows Vista/7 is obligatory.

        There are several switches that control the behaviour including Windows INF and registry keys. The feature is not enabled with an older PCIe-version. Also windows checks, according to the PCIe-Spec recommendations, how much time a mode switch takes and if it can involve a buffer overflow.

        The ASPM setting in the FADT, initially set by the BIOS, can be overwritten by Windows. See also http://download.microsoft.com/downlo...pa070_wh06.ppt.

        Comment


        • The Windows way according to a comment on heise.de

          Maybe also a good way to implement it on Linux:

          http://www.heise.de/open/news/foren/...20449341/read/

          Translated:
          Normally Windows activates ASPM, when Root Complex (Chipset) and Endpoint (PCIe-card) in ConfigSpace indicate that they support the L0s and L1 energy saving mode. Windows Vista/7 is obligatory.

          There are several switches that control the behaviour including Windows INF and registry keys. The feature is not enabled with an older PCIe-version. Also windows checks, according to the PCIe-Spec recommendations, how much time a mode switch takes and if it can involve a buffer overflow.

          The ASPM setting in the FADT, initially set by the BIOS, can be overwritten by Windows. See also http://download.microsoft.com/downlo...pa070_wh06.ppt.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by RoyD View Post
            Maybe also a good way to implement it on Linux:

            http://www.heise.de/open/news/foren/...20449341/read/

            Translated:
            Normally Windows activates ASPM, when Root Complex (Chipset) and Endpoint (PCIe-card) in ConfigSpace indicate that they support the L0s and L1 energy saving mode. Windows Vista/7 is obligatory.

            There are several switches that control the behaviour including Windows INF and registry keys. The feature is not enabled with an older PCIe-version. Also windows checks, according to the PCIe-Spec recommendations, how much time a mode switch takes and if it can involve a buffer overflow.

            The ASPM setting in the FADT, initially set by the BIOS, can be overwritten by Windows. See also http://download.microsoft.com/downlo...pa070_wh06.ppt.
            Maybe if you'd mail that to the Linux Kernel Mailing List, you'd get some desicionmaking eyeballs (programmer eyeballs) to fix the issue

            Comment

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