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Lenovo IdeaPad S10

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  • #11
    I just wrote to samsung and they answered that really many people also wanted a windows free netbook. I think if you don't want a forced windows, just write to the manufacturer and if that do enough people they really see that there is interest and maybe they change! Just write and hope! (Even if it's for the next generation)

    By the way: the nvidia petition has now 10.000+ Signs!
    http://www.opentheblob.com/nvidia/


    (...with some messages of spam bots included. Maybe there should be one more maths quiz or similar included, to hold them off.)

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Zhick View Post
      Here in germany they are sold as s10e (e for education), with SuSe Enterprise Linux. Unfortunately these models come with a reflecting screen. But they've got a 160 GB HD, 1,5 GB ram and a 6-cell-battery to make up for it, and for a realy great price: 329 with Linux and 369 with Windows (which has only 1 GB of ram) (that's 433$/485$).
      Linux + 160gb hdd + 1,5gb ram + 6 cell battery --> That's more like it!

      If that model is available here in Portugal, I might just get it. I have to ask around then...

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      • #13
        Seeing the bigger interest in notebooks lately in Phoronix, it would be cool if you could find some tests to benchmark wi-fi performance and battery life. It would have been interesting to compare the performance of the broadcom vs. atheros cards in these two netbooks under Linux (and see how they compare to an intel one).

        In battery life, even if comparing a 6 cell battery vs. a 3 cell one is not fair, just dividing the W/h of each battery between the hours of battery life can give the power consumption in watts, which would be interesting (in this case to since they use the same platform, it would serve to see the difference in power consumption between the normal HDD and the SSD, and also the wi-fi cards could have different power requirements).

        Thanks for the test!

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        • #14
          Most netbooks use the same Atom cpu and the same chipset - 160 gb hd, 1 gb ram due to xp, diffs are mainly display, keyboardlayout and battery but not speed.

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          • #15
            Which is exactly why I'm waiting for a convertible, stylish touchscreen netbook that has the Nano.

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            • #16
              Hey Phoronix Team!

              I think your rating-widget is broken: It shows 8/10 points no matter what product you test. :-) SCNR

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              • #17
                It appears that the benchmarks between the Samsung and the S10 might have been much closer if the S10 had 1GB of memory. It would be interesting to bump up the memory, and run the tests again.

                I've had a S10 for a week or two, and while the keyboard is indeed small, the action/feel is nearly perfect, in fact I am writing my fiction book on my S10 because I can type faster on in, with less tiring than I can with my Thinkpad T61P. My criticisms are the S10 keyboard are the same as those about the EEE PC's and the Macbook: keys need a little concavity in them to be easy to type on.

                I experiment with any netbook I can get my hands on, and so far, the only one I didn't care for was the Dell, which I can not find a way to produce an F11 on. In stores the HP's are always loosing their keycaps, suggesting that there is too much keycap for the action that makes it work. The EEE's have solid state drives down on the cheap, and their community is second to none.

                There are two complaints I have about the S10, the cord unplug sound is quite loud, and the fan speed points could be better in the BIOS. With that said, after a week of nearly constant use, I really like the S10. In fact, when I toss a 200GB hard drive in it, it might become my main computer, because it's so portable. I may get a 6-battery, but at the same time, I'm not sure I want to carry it to the coffee shop every day.

                Oddly, I have even done CAD, Rhino 3D, and even a bit of raytracing on a netbook : )

                Although it's a WIP, there's a guide to putting Ubuntu on a S10 here:
                http://s10lenovo.com/wiki/index.php5?title=Ubuntu_8.10
                Last edited by BrendaEM; 01-27-2009, 10:16 PM.

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                • #18
                  i'm having trouble with the wireless card in my lenovo s10. the connection breaks down all of the time, unable to establish a connection after resuming from suspend, etc. so i'm thinking to replace this mini pci express card by something better supported in linux. do you guys have an idea for a nice replacement? the card inside my s10 is a broadcom bcm4312 chipset

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by toams View Post
                    i'm having trouble with the wireless card in my lenovo s10. the connection breaks down all of the time, unable to establish a connection after resuming from suspend, etc. so i'm thinking to replace this mini pci express card by something better supported in linux. do you guys have an idea for a nice replacement? the card inside my s10 is a broadcom bcm4312 chipset
                    For that broadcom, I think there are at least two drivers supporting it: b43 and broadcom-wl (aka broadcom linux sta). You might want to check which driver you're using, and see if using the other helps.

                    As for a replacement, I've had good experiences with atheros stuff (using ath5k/ath9k driver), and also Intel is usually top-notch.
                    You can find some information on which devices have what, and about wireless drivers in here: http://linuxwireless.org/en/users .

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