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Will Wright's SPORE makes customers angry (DRM inside)

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  • #21
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    SecuROM has been cracked/emulated/circumvented/etc/etc/etc already. Only legit customers are treated like junk, the warez dudes only laugh at them cause they're not affected by the copy protection at all.

    Some suits in those big companies seem to have the I.Q. of a potato. Makes you wonder how they got their position in the first place.
    My friend got the game before it came out on a torrent. he doesn't have to deal with the securerom....

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    • #22
      Well I might be completely wrong, but I think the reason for the limited installs isn't the warez guys, but limiting 2nd hand resale.

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      • #23
        Which is as moronic as the other one. 2nd hand is a big deal. Sure for these sold copies you get nothing but hey that's like selling cars which blow up once you try to sell it to somebody else. It's just a brain-fucked idea to do it. Some shops around here even exist mainly due to 2nd hand business.

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        • #24
          Plus limiting resale is of questionable legality. You buy the game, you own the game, you can do what you like with the game.

          If that's the legal opinion for AutoCAD, it's certainly going to be the opinion for games... They can claim EULA, but that claim has no legal relevance unless the courts agree with it.

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          • #25
            Their reasoning is that while "business productivity" software can be sold as volume license packages, and lots of money can be made through forced updates and tech support, games do not have any of that. The only source of income from entertaintment software is through the good ole retail shelf sales.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by RobbieAB View Post
              Plus limiting resale is of questionable legality. You buy the game, you own the game, you can do what you like with the game.
              That's why they would never admit that is to limit 2nd hand resale, and always talk about the "pirates".

              But fact is that it limits 2nd hand resale (or giving it to a friend for free after finishing it), and I think that is the sole reason why such a "copy protection" exists today.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by Julius View Post
                That's why they would never admit that is to limit 2nd hand resale, and always talk about the "pirates".

                But fact is that it limits 2nd hand resale (or giving it to a friend for free after finishing it), and I think that is the sole reason why such a "copy protection" exists today.
                That's what i was thinking too. I even see another "Steam" around the corner. This time from EA

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                • #28
                  Steam from EA? I don't know what it would look like but it would be really bad for any party involved :P

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by RobbieAB View Post
                    Plus limiting resale is of questionable legality. You buy the game, you own the game, you can do what you like with the game.
                    I see where you're coming from, but the DMCA and similar laws screwed up this logic. Even if you do own an authorized copy (which is, despite the pseudo-legal gibberish in EULAs, what happens when you put a software box on the checkout counter at Best Buy and give them money for it), the application of DRM apparently makes it illegal to use it in ways that would otherwise be legal, because bypassing the DRM (or distributing the tools to do so) is itself illegal. This gives publishers veto power over almost every practical use. This is why the anti-circumvention part of the DMCA is so awful: it's "copyright" in name only, and grants a vast new pseudo-right to publishers to restrict use in virtually any way that can be enforced by a DRM scheme. It's like a privilege escalation exploit in legal code, and the US Senate passed it 99-0. We need a better auditing process.

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                    • #30
                      Has the DMCA yet been tested in the Supreme Court? Does it apply in other jurisdictions?

                      The DMCA is only as powerful as the courts willingness to support it...

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