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There's Now 500 Games On Steam For Linux

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  • There's Now 500 Games On Steam For Linux

    Phoronix: There's Now 500 Games On Steam For Linux

    It just so happens on the tenth birthday of Phoronix that 500 games are now available for Linux via SteamOS...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcxMTY

  • #2
    This is beyond huge. I don't play computer games, but just three years ago, people would get laughed at for trying to game in Linux. Today, we have 500 titles. Amazing. Michael, you were really up so something when you mentioned that Steam for Linux was huge. It's a good day to be an open source freak

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    • #3
      ...but do they work?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by johnc View Post
        ...but do they work?
        70% "working" .

        http://steamdb.info/linux/

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        • #5
          yes

          Originally posted by johnc View Post
          ...but do they work?

          all working here (28)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rikkinho View Post
            all working here (28)
            i'm yet to find one that wouldn't out of 42. and out of 20+ windows games, only 2 don't work in wine. strangely one of those 2 is two worlds 2 which not one single person says it had any problems

            friend with amd card has completely different experience though with both catalyst and oss drivers

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            • #7
              Originally posted by johnc View Post
              ...but do they work?
              That's a really good question. Out of ~150 that I have in my library I'd say it's 50% ok. The rest either don't run, crash, have mem leaks, don't have working cloud saves, don't have working achievements, don't support gamepads (while the windows version does), have glitches, are in a permanent beta status for 3 years, are in a different version so saves aren't compatible or there are features missing or have other really really dumb bugs (e.g. FTL has changed the save directory between updates from "~/.fasterthanlight" to "~/.FasterThanLight" - how stupid is that?)... the list goes on. It's not a pretty picture with the cherry on the cake being the recent Witcher 2 (I'm still hating the devs, cause I bought it on the day of Linux release & it still doesn't work).

              The worst thing being that the devleopers of these games don't even care. They rarely listen to the bugs that people post on the steam forum and even less often fix them. Many Linux ports seem like a slap in the face so people would just shut up and stop nagging the devs for the port.

              There are really few technically good games, e.g. everything from Frictional Games and most Unity3D engine games (Unity3D being even better than on windows cause you can backup your saves cause they are in files compared to windows registry ;-) ), but the rest is a coin flip :-/.
              Last edited by Cyber Killer; 06-06-2014, 12:40 AM.

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              • #8
                Serious Linux gamer here! (And game dev!)

                The early days of Linux-for-Steam definitely had a lot of problems with games. But there have been improvements both by the vendors and by Valve improving its runtime support library, and newer games seem to work fine for me. I think these are expected teething problems, as for many devs this is their first real experience with making Linux games.

                For the record, I have Steam games that don't work well in Windows 7/8, either (usually games from the XP era). My Mac-using friends also report a lot of serious breakage, especially between OS X versions.

                It remains extremely baffling that you have no way to return games, not even for credit, on Steam. If you bought a game and it doesn't work as advertised, well, it's your loss only. There is obviously a risk that this will infuriate future SteamOS gamers: console gamers have far less patience than PC gamers. Steam better get rid of any game doesn't work on every Steam Machine before they hit the shelves.

                Anyway: 500 games is amazing! Many of them are "casual games" ported from cross-platform mobile, but that's still stunning considering that just a few years ago all we had was solitaire, TuxCart and Sauerbraten. I still reboot to Windows sometimes (I call it "GameOS", and it's just Windows 8 with Steam installed, nothing else), but I find myself more and more staying in Ubuntu.

                Michael, please do some reporting on Desura, too. You mention Steam and even GOG, but Desura is a minor player in this market that has supported Linux for a long time, and has many titles that Steam doesn't ... it would be curious to know statistics there.

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                • #9
                  Regular Linux Steam gamer here: Numbers are one thing, but having some AAA titles around is also important. Luckily that starts to look good too. With releases like Civilization Beyond Earth coming to Linux I see a lot of time wasted with playing games. I'd hope Bethesda would join the club too with their next Elder Scrolls single player game, but they seem to be somewhat confused in that regard (both single player and Linux). I'm curious what kind of pull SteamBoxes will cause once they are finally out and what Valves answer to the Oculus Rift debacle will be.

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                  • #10
                    I have about 40 games, aprox 20 are Source derived (almost complete half-life and multiplayer games like CS, TF ...). The rest is casual stupidities originaly bought in Humble bundles.

                    Now I did not encounter any serious problem yet. Most of them were fixed either by me (component updates) or the game devs (Serious Sam3 is a good example).

                    The only odd one is Witcher 2, but for 3.99 on the sale, I cannot complain :-)) I bought it just to show support. Did not expect it to work (not on my crap hardware).

                    However I'd have an issue with Steam client. Or rather game organisation. If you gothrough the full search and pick Linux platform you get vastly more entries than when you do through the store Games/Linux menu. WTF ???

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      desura

                      Originally posted by emblemparade View Post
                      Serious Linux gamer here! (And game dev!)

                      The early days of Linux-for-Steam definitely had a lot of problems with games. But there have been improvements both by the vendors and by Valve improving its runtime support library, and newer games seem to work fine for me. I think these are expected teething problems, as for many devs this is their first real experience with making Linux games.

                      For the record, I have Steam games that don't work well in Windows 7/8, either (usually games from the XP era). My Mac-using friends also report a lot of serious breakage, especially between OS X versions.

                      It remains extremely baffling that you have no way to return games, not even for credit, on Steam. If you bought a game and it doesn't work as advertised, well, it's your loss only. There is obviously a risk that this will infuriate future SteamOS gamers: console gamers have far less patience than PC gamers. Steam better get rid of any game doesn't work on every Steam Machine before they hit the shelves.

                      Anyway: 500 games is amazing! Many of them are "casual games" ported from cross-platform mobile, that's still stunning considering that just a few years ago all we had was solitaire, TuxCart and Sauerbraten. I still reboot to Windows sometimes (I call it "GameOS", and it's just Windows 8 with Steam installed, nothing else), but I find myself more and more staying in Ubuntu.

                      Michael, please do some reporting on Desura, too. You mention Steam and even GOG, but Desura is a minor player in this market that has supported Linux for a long time, and has many titles that Steam doesn't ... it would be curious to know statistics there.
                      Reports on desirable would be. Nice. And hints how it can be run on openSUSE. It crashes or has graphics corruption in the interface since years. Maybe due to radeonsi OSS driver?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tomtomme View Post
                        Reports on desirable would be. Nice. And hints how it can be run on openSUSE. It crashes or has graphics corruption in the interface since years. Maybe due to radeonsi OSS driver?
                        Proper English would be nice too - it took me a while to understand what you mean.

                        Anyway, the Desura client runs mostly ok on OpenSUSE, at least as far as installing and running games goes. Browsing the store causes crashing atm, but that can be done from a separate browser. Exiting doesn't work at all and never has.

                        There is the floss client (Desurium) on OBS, you can try to use that, it works... hmm... I wouldn't say better, cause it has bugs also, but it has different bugs so it might be better for your use case ;-).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by skriticos View Post
                          Regular Linux Steam gamer here: Numbers are one thing, but having some AAA titles around is also important. Luckily that starts to look good too.
                          Also very important is that all the major gaming engines now support Linux or are close to supporting it. This will have a huge impact on the amount of effort it will take for future AAA titles to have Linux support.

                          I do want to point out that engine support does not give you automatic Linux support: the devs still need to make the decision as to whether they want to go D3D or OpenGL or both. Many games still need a lot of custom shaders beyond what the engine offers. Still, engine support goes a very long way towards making a Linux port feasible.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cyber Killer View Post
                            Proper English would be nice too - it took me a while to understand what you mean.

                            Anyway, the Desura client runs mostly ok on OpenSUSE, at least as far as installing and running games goes. Browsing the store causes crashing atm, but that can be done from a separate browser. Exiting doesn't work at all and never has.

                            There is the floss client (Desurium) on OBS, you can try to use that, it works... hmm... I wouldn't say better, cause it has bugs also, but it has different bugs so it might be better for your use case ;-).
                            sorry for the bad english. Smartphone autocorrection played with me. I am no native however...

                            I used desurium before and just tried it again. Today is one of the better days - it works more or less...
                            Is the offical client closed source? Does it offer different features (you only mentioned different bugs )?
                            I think last time I tried it was 3 years ago...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tomtomme View Post
                              sorry for the bad english. Smartphone autocorrection played with me. I am no native however...

                              I used desurium before and just tried it again. Today is one of the better days - it works more or less...
                              Is the offical client closed source? Does it offer different features (you only mentioned different bugs )?
                              I think last time I tried it was 3 years ago...
                              Desurium is the (almost) official client - only the branding is different. The current client downloadable from the Desura website is from a time before the code was opened a few years ago and no updates were made ever since. The whole idea was that the community would take over the client code and in the end Desura would only slap their logo on it and put it on their site. This method has more or less failed at the same time when Desura got rid of their paid coders. So the current situation is: the official client is way old and Desurium is made by a couple of motivated people, but the development version is still not ready to be put as the next official Desura client. :-(

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