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Steam On Linux Use Reported At About 1.2%

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  • #16
    Originally posted by entropy View Post
    I wonder why we don't see more AAA titles on Steam Linux by now.
    Seems like the publishers wait for the very day the Steam Machines are officially released.

    Wouldn't it be a great chance to release some of the titles (probably ported already)
    Why do you expect AAA titles at this time when Linux support in major game engines have just been added? It won't be before Christmas season until we start seeing some AAA titles, and it won't be until Christmas next year before it becomes a norm to see new AAA titles on Linux.

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    • #17
      The real number is probably quite a bit higher, a lot of linux users are probably using the windows version of Steam through wine, and there are probably many linux users who either haven't gotten the hardware survey, or refused to take it at all.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by sarmad View Post
        Why do you expect AAA titles at this time when Linux support in major game engines have just been added? It won't be before Christmas season until we start seeing some AAA titles, and it won't be until Christmas next year before it becomes a norm to see new AAA titles on Linux.
        That's also what i think about it.

        Also...with a bit of luck , AMD will solve their Catalyst problems at most till Xmas 2015 and by then is when SteamBox will be launched offcially with a decent ammount games at launch date ready to play.

        With Unity, UE4, and CE engines all now supporting Linux, game devs have now almost two years to start develop games that will be ready when SteamBox is out...

        Meanwhile, the hype around XB1 and PS4 should be cooled of, so, it should the right moment to do the SteamBox launch.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
          I agree that we can't realistically rely on games being natively ported to linux, on the other hand, wine is equally as unreliable in the short term. Wine might be able to run the game at some point, but long after you lost interest in it.
          I wanna treat Wine like DOSBox, to play games from before. Not as a way to game in the future.
          Besides, in the end, a game running in wine is still considered being run through windows, so statistically wine isn't helping the future of linux gaming.
          If people are going to jump on Linux, they'll want their old applications working. Even Microsoft has Problems with getting people away from Windows Xp, because of that very reason. Why pay people to patch and fix Windows XP when you could just update the OS? Cause there's a good chance your application made in 1995 won't work in Windows 7 or 8.

          If Microsoft is having a hard time getting people to switch, then what chance does Linux have without decent compatibility?

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          • #20
            I've all running fine in Wine. From Photoshop to Rage. Even doing a backup is as simple as copying ~.wine. Death simple. Project Cars will be my next purchase.

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            • #21
              For me it's about ease of jumping in

              1. If they would only package the Steam client for 64-bit Linux! It's really off-putting to have to install 500 i686 libraries. I have not installed Steam since a re-install simply because of this reason. You mention 64bit client to a Windows person and they start a 50 page thread on the benefits of 64-bit addressing vs 32-bit addressing and how it's not worth it for Steam, but they totally miss the issue.

              2. gfx drivers, as already stated, are an issue. I use AMD HD7750, and RadeonSI is perfectly functional in the desktop, but underperforms Catalyst. However, it's such a hassle with AMD binary drivers, having to wait for compatibilty with X11, having to reinstall on every kernel update. I'd tolerate lower performance just for the benefit of full compatibility between RadeonSI and the rest of the Linux stack. If I had an nVidia card, then the binary is the only alternative, and works very smoothly, it's just that im a free software enthusiast.

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