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Razer's DeathAdder 6400 DPI Gaming Mouse On Linux

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  • Razer's DeathAdder 6400 DPI Gaming Mouse On Linux

    Phoronix: Razer's DeathAdder 6400 DPI Gaming Mouse On Linux

    While new games continue to be announced for Linux almost daily and Valve's SteamOS and Steam Machines efforts are pushing more hardware vendors towards looking at Linux support, leading gaming peripheral manufacturer Razer still goes without Linux support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU4NTQ

  • #2
    ROCCAT has had open source drivers for Linux for years now. Here's more information on the subject.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by FutureSuture View Post
      ROCCAT has had open source drivers for Linux for years now. Here's more information on the subject.
      I was about to ask which gaming mouse companies do offer Linux drivers, thanks for the link. My next will probably be a ROCCAT.

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      • #4
        Roccat ftw!

        i have Roccat Arvo keyboard and Kova+ mouse, both have macro, tweaking utilities for linux
        can change dpi, lights, macros, easy shift buttons etc with a GUI..

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        • #5
          Originally posted by elapsed View Post
          I was about to ask which gaming mouse companies do offer Linux drivers, thanks for the link. My next will probably be a ROCCAT.
          You're welcome. The guy who makes the open source Linux drivers made several posts in that topic under the name erazor_de. Informative stuff.

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          • #6
            I´ve been using Roccat peripherals for a few years now, and I can confirm they are working fine on Linux. Although I have no idea how to set the custom buttons.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by clementl View Post
              I´ve been using Roccat peripherals for a few years now, and I can confirm they are working fine on Linux. Although I have no idea how to set the custom buttons.
              Hope this helps:

              Originally posted by ROCCAT
              If you have any questions or if you have any problems during the installation process, please contact the driver programmer here: http://sourceforge.net/users/erazor_de

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              • #8
                I have a classic DeathAdder. It's pretty nice, although I'm yet to find out why one would ever need to change the DPI (as opposed to changing OS mouse settings). I bought it for the durability, ergonomics and button layout.

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                • #9
                  Personally, I'm not fond of generic devices that REQUIRE 3rd party drivers, even in Windows. I also don't care for a DPI that high, and I don't like spending a lot of money on a product that will break down around the same time as something worth less than half the price (assuming I take care of it).

                  I don't hate the Razer company, I just never found their products appealing to me personally.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                    Personally, I'm not fond of generic devices that REQUIRE 3rd party drivers, even in Windows. I also don't care for a DPI that high, and I don't like spending a lot of money on a product that will break down around the same time as something worth less than half the price (assuming I take care of it).

                    I don't hate the Razer company, I just never found their products appealing to me personally.
                    I have a Razer Lycosa (a keyboard), which works perfectly well as-is under Linux.

                    I also have a Madcatz (formerly Cyborg) R.A.T. 5 mouse, which requires the following to be added to xorg.conf, but works perfectly thereafter:
                    Code:
                    Section "InputClass"
                    	Identifier             "Cyborg RAT 5"
                    	MatchProduct       "R.A.T.5|R.A.T.7|R.A.T.9"
                    	MatchDevicePath  "/dev/input/event*"
                    	Option                "Buttons" "17"
                    	Option	         "ButtonMapping" "1 2 3 4 5 0 0 8 9 7 6 12 0 0 0 16 17"
                    	Option                "AutoReleaseButtons" "13 14 15"
                    	Option	         "ZAxisMapping" "4 5 6 7"
                    EndSection
                    My main problem with Razer is their new configuration tool for the Lycosa - if you want to store any key bindings or configuration options then you need to use their tool to do so. However, the new tool requires you to create an account with them. That's why I'm not so keen on them.

                    I've generally found that 'gaming' equipment lasts longer that cheap counterparts, but I'm probably comparing opposite ends of the scale. I tend not to be bothered about the cost of a keyboard/mouse so much as how it feels to use it - given how often I use them both I'll happily pay extra for something I like the feel of.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                      Personally, I'm not fond of generic devices that REQUIRE 3rd party drivers, even in Windows. I also don't care for a DPI that high, and I don't like spending a lot of money on a product that will break down around the same time as something worth less than half the price (assuming I take care of it).

                      I don't hate the Razer company, I just never found their products appealing to me personally.
                      At least my classic DeathAdder never requires any 3rd party drivers, not on Linux and not on Windows. In fact, it's been years since I installed any Razer tools (I just don't see much point in that), Linux and Windows both. As for breaking down, my friend has a Copperhead mouse and it's still working fine last I heard. And it's been years (a decade at the very least) since it was purchased. My DeathAdder was purchased on 2009 and still works just as fine right now (meanwhile regular mice that my parents use keep dying every year).

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                      • #12
                        At first I thought, great, an article about this mouse I was considering, I’ll know how it works under Linux… but no, there is no information about that. It’s nice to know there is a tool for other models of Razer mice and not this one I guess…

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by stqn View Post
                          At first I thought, great, an article about this mouse I was considering, I’ll know how it works under Linux… but no, there is no information about that. It’s nice to know there is a tool for other models of Razer mice and not this one I guess…
                          The mouse works on Linux but you lack any of the special features... Not too much to add beyond that compared to my earlier DeathAdder article.
                          Michael Larabel
                          http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                          • #14
                            When I was shopping for a mouse I looked at Linux compatibility but one thing was higher on my list; left-handedness.

                            Bought the Razer Naga 2014 Left-Handed and couldn't be happier (well, a colour-changing LED would've been nice...). The buttons on the side default to the numpad, so it was easy to map my game functions to them. No drivers needed, just plug'n'play like all good USB things should be.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by archibald View Post
                              I've generally found that 'gaming' equipment lasts longer that cheap counterparts, but I'm probably comparing opposite ends of the scale. I tend not to be bothered about the cost of a keyboard/mouse so much as how it feels to use it - given how often I use them both I'll happily pay extra for something I like the feel of.
                              My personal experience says otherwise.

                              Received a Lycosa as a present and it decided to kill itself after the 13th month. So cannot even go to claim warranty on it.

                              The DeathAdder didn't last much longer either. At this rate it's more economical to replace cheap keyboards and mice yearly than spend top dollar on gaming-grade peripherals that don't even last beyond the second year.

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