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Unigine Supports New Advanced Simulation Features

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  • Unigine Supports New Advanced Simulation Features

    Phoronix: Unigine Supports New Advanced Simulation Features

    While the Unigine Engine sadly hasn't taken off in the expanding world of Linux gaming, Unigine appears to be successfully luring in commercial customers with using the advanced 3D game engine for visualization and simulation purposes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTUyODA

  • #2
    The video looks absolutely horrible.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ACiD View Post
      The video looks absolutely horrible.
      Yeah, compared with Heaven, I was extremely unimpressed by this demo.

      On the other hand, it doesn't matter because I'm too poor to afford a card that can run Unigine anyway

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      • #4
        unigine hasn't taken off because it costs thousands++ to license
        why would anyone pick it over e.g, unity?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by peppercats View Post
          unigine hasn't taken off because it costs thousands++ to license
          why would anyone pick it over e.g, unity?
          Unreal costed ~$24,000 for the first year of licensing, and then a portion of profits every single year as long as your game was distributed (at least that's what it was when I last checked, which was a while ago. I think they've switched to a dynamic licensing model now), yet people use that ALL THE TIME.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
            Unreal costed ~$24,000 for the first year of licensing, and then a portion of profits every single year as long as your game was distributed (at least that's what it was when I last checked, which was a while ago. I think they've switched to a dynamic licensing model now), yet people use that ALL THE TIME.
            Cool? And exactly what tech does unigine have making it worth anywhere near that much? Or notable games published with it?

            There's no reason to use unigine when unity exists, barely anyone even uses the royalty version of unreal(UDK) anymore.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Phoronix
              While the Unigine Engine sadly hasn't taken off in the expanding world of Linux gaming
              Why sadly? It's just another proprietary engine

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              • #8
                Originally posted by peppercats View Post
                Cool? And exactly what tech does unigine have making it worth anywhere near that much? Or notable games published with it?

                There's no reason to use unigine when unity exists, barely anyone even uses the royalty version of unreal(UDK) anymore.
                Unity based games, for the most parts, suck. I've no clue if it's the developers that can't try/catch basic NullReferenceExceptions or if the engine is that horrible. Every single game I tried (Guns of Icarus Online, Verdun, Kerbal, Sir You are being hunted) is crashing at least once/hour (sometimes even reproduceable).

                Also if you compare Unity to Unigine...Unigine is far more powerful, regardless of what you look at. Be it graphics, performance or stability. Also you can simulate a far greater world in Unigine.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Detructor View Post
                  Unity based games, for the most parts, suck. I've no clue if it's the developers that can't try/catch basic NullReferenceExceptions or if the engine is that horrible. Every single game I tried (Guns of Icarus Online, Verdun, Kerbal, Sir You are being hunted) is crashing at least once/hour (sometimes even reproduceable).

                  Also if you compare Unity to Unigine...Unigine is far more powerful, regardless of what you look at. Be it graphics, performance or stability. Also you can simulate a far greater world in Unigine.
                  So uh, what games have been published with unigine that show off its "power" or "stability"?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by peppercats View Post
                    So uh, what games have been published with unigine that show off its "power" or "stability"?
                    Relics of Annorath. It's in Alpha right now and that game did not crash once on me. OilRush would be another one.

                    Sadly there are not that many games for it. But that's 2/2 that don't crash. While for Unity we've 4/4 that are crashing.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Detructor View Post
                      Relics of Annorath. It's in Alpha right now and that game did not crash once on me. OilRush would be another one.

                      Sadly there are not that many games for it. But that's 2/2 that don't crash. While for Unity we've 4/4 that are crashing.
                      Wow, I'm glad we're using your anecdotal evidence to judge the engines or here I would have thought the engine with dozens of actual published games for a variety of platforms was more successful than the engine with one published game that was made by the engine's developers.
                      Woops, silly me!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Detructor View Post
                        RWhile for Unity we've 4/4 that are crashing.
                        Just for you

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by peppercats View Post
                          Wow, I'm glad we're using your anecdotal evidence to judge the engines or here I would have thought the engine with dozens of actual published games for a variety of platforms was more successful than the engine with one published game that was made by the engine's developers.
                          Woops, silly me!
                          well, since you don't have any counter-argument for backing up Unity, my core argument (Unity being unstable) still stands. Also this is not about successful or not (judging by that matter, Unigine is way more successful, given it's used for simulation purposes by various companies as stated on their website and I don't think that those simulations are crashing once/hour, then again those probably run on better computers, too.).

                          Being successful has nothing to do with having a stable engine. There are countless games (in fact, most of the triple A titles out there) that proof that, the more successful a game is, the more bug-ridden it is.

                          @philip550c if you're playing any of those three games on a standard system (32 bit, multicore processor and a GPU that is a few years old), those 4 games will crash for you, too. (given, I haven' tried Kerbal in a while...3 to 4 months ago was the last time I tried to do something with it).
                          Last edited by Detructor; 11-28-2013, 12:33 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Having used a lot of Unigine and a bit of Unity....
                            I hope the following helps - assuming you want answers to your questions and not just to stage a pissing contest.

                            Unity

                            + basic version is free and available to anybody with a windows or mac based computer. Though this is somewhat limited, pro version is something similar to a 12 month unigine license.
                            + really strong community of hobbyists and commercial 3rd party solutions.
                            + tools are very approachable by artists, can create something reasonable without requiring a coder.
                            + quite a number of titles have shipped based on unity.
                            + usability,polish are priorities
                            + export to a lot of useful platforms

                            - scalability issues - once you get a certain size of project you will run into performance issues.
                            - multi person workflow not so great. really easy to break when using an off the shelf source management system.
                            - not as much control as as some people would like.

                            Unigine

                            + really good engine quality , bang for buck. To get better you need to go for Crysis or Unreal which cost quite a bit more to license.
                            + source code can be had and is relatively affordable.
                            + focus on making it possible to build really large worlds.
                            + performance,coder control are priorities.
                            + Linux is a first class citizen. You can make games using Unigine on Linux - you can't do this with unity.
                            + mesh files are binaries, textures are image files, pretty much everything is xml files and the filesystem adding a unigine project to something like git,svn,perforce is trivial.
                            + Unigine team is small and fairly responsive to customers.
                            + support for a lot of platforms.

                            - you can't get access to unigine as a hobbyist.
                            - the artist tools - while getting better, do something to be desired.
                            - there is a much smaller labour pool for artists and coders that know Unigine. (this can be seen as a plus depending on your perspective).

                            Generally I think you will find that your project will either lend itself to one or the other.
                            Currently Unigine is your best bet if you want to author games using Linux.
                            Last edited by kayosiii; 11-28-2013, 10:08 PM.

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                            • #15
                              I might also add that writing game code feels very unixy. Also if you are familiar with OpenGL and GLSL then the scripting language will feel very familiar.

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