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A Year Later, Linux Game Publishing Is Still Irrelevant

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  • #41
    Originally posted by e8hffff View Post
    If you want a vibrant market you need to embellish it. It's like selling old fruit vs new. People want fresh new fruit, it's as simple as that.
    While I can see your point, to me it's only an old game if I've played it before. And even if I have played it, if a game was good ten (or twenty, or thirty, or ...) years ago, and I can still get it to run, there's a good chance I'll still enjoy it.

    I'm still trying to catch up with the good games from the nineties.

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    • #42
      Not to mention theres a lack of support for LGP Ports. Recently decided to reinstall X3: Reunion and the game wont run, sent an email to support/opened a ticket, the reply i got was the game will not run on any modern/semi modern AMD video cards basically none of the AMD HD based chipsets, i asked if there were any plans to rectify the problem and havent received a reply as of yet, sent the email/opened the support ticket in october of 2012, received the first reply a month later. Now i read they lost the X license so i guess i will have to hunt down either an old ATI card or something from Nvidia to play the game.

      It looks like LGP is going the way of the Dodo.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by curaga View Post
        Please show me one movie with such exploits for at least two (2) current versions of open source players.
        Sorry, I don't pirate movies of any type. But even a cursory skimming of the results at nvd.nist.gov shows you to have your head up your ass.

        http://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/se...pe=all&cves=on <- mplayer
        http://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/se...pe=all&cves=on <-vlc

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        • #44
          Originally posted by yogi_berra View Post
          Sorry, I don't pirate movies of any type. But even a cursory skimming of the results at nvd.nist.gov shows you to have your head up your ass.

          http://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/se...pe=all&cves=on <- mplayer
          http://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/se...pe=all&cves=on <-vlc
          The most recent Mplayer codec vulnerability was in halfway 2011, and you claim I have my head up my ass. Dear Troll, please re-read my post where I said *current* version.

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          • #45
            I find it terribly amusing how people in this thread so quickly started screaming about zealots and people getting bent out of shape about Steam even when they were the first ones to truly get bent out of shape over it. It is a common reaction from people who buy into a certain worldview, suddenly believe they are the majority, and then feel threatened when they realize there are still people who disagree with them.

            In my case, I find the limits placed on me by Steam to be unacceptable, and therefore I do not use it and prefer other platforms and actively promote them instead. If that idea bothers you so much I must really ask why you feel the need to get so personally involved if you claim to be a "pragmatic" person who does not care about these moral or ethical concerns - I really do not see the need for passion in a "pragmatic" argument.

            I also really dislike the idea that people try to minimize these concerns by saying that games are merely "entertainment" as if that means that they should be given less scrutiny or have less concern placed on the availability of their content. I actually care about my entertainment and my cultural pursuits, and as such I do see the need to comprehend the ethical and political concerns that relate to gaming and other art forms. I do not see why them being "entertainment" in anyway diminishes the fact that I want to keep playing the games I have purchased, keep playing them in a fashion I accept as being acceptable, and want these games to still be accessible to later generations.

            Same thing applies with movies, music, and other content as well - everyone being so blasť about them is part of the reason why the industries responsible for their creation have fallen into the state they are in, and I am concerned about this happening to games as well.

            So please, do not tell me to shut up when you supposedly do not care. Apathy is not a legitimate argument against passion or concern.
            Last edited by Hamish Wilson; 01-29-2013, 02:15 PM.

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            • #46
              Originally posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
              I find it terribly amusing how people in this thread so quickly started screaming about zealots and people getting bent out of shape about Steam even when they were the first ones to truly get bent out of shape over it. It is a common reaction from people who buy into a certain worldview, suddenly believe they are the majority, and then feel threatened when they realize there are still people who disagree with them.

              In my case, I find the limits placed on me by Steam to be unacceptable, and therefore I do not use it and prefer other platforms and actively promote them instead. If that idea bothers you so much I must really ask why you feel the need to get so personally involved if you claim to be a "pragmatic" person who does not care about these moral or ethical concerns - I really do not see the need for passion in a "pragmatic" argument.

              I also really dislike the idea that people try to minimize these concerns by saying that games are merely "entertainment" as if that means that they should be given less scrutiny or have less concern placed on the availability of their content. I actually care about my entertainment and my cultural pursuits, and as such I do see the need to comprehend the ethical and political concerns that relate to gaming and other art forms. I do not see why them being "entertainment" in anyway diminishes the fact that I want to keep playing the games I have purchased, keep playing them in a fashion I accept as being acceptable, and want these games to still be accessible to later generations.

              Same thing applies with movies, music, and other content as well - everyone being so blasť about them is part of the reason why the industries responsible for their creation have fallen into the state they are in, and I am concerned about this happening to games as well.

              So please, do not tell me to shut up when you supposedly do not care. Apathy is not a legitimate argument against passion or concern.
              I could not agree more. You might have read my previous criticism on Steam and other non-free software under GNU/Linux, but when we put it in broader terms like you did, the most painful experience for me personally is having to listen to the radio every day. What is left from the music industry is just rotten flesh of a long-gone art-form.
              Not caring is really the biggest danger. When RMS talks about software-freedom, it is about common participation. Participation is the driving force of the entire free-software-movement.
              If I had to credit the big companies managing game-, music- and movie-licenses for one thing, then it would be definitely their success in getting their customers into a state of indifference. Nobody cares for long-term benefits or -damage of things they use, but for the apparently greatest self-interest and biggest fun (including entertainment).

              This may work, but it is not sustainable the way it is.

              A little note in this context: Having went through removing all non-free-licensed software from my computer (running Gentoo) (including Kernel-BLOBS), our dependency on non-free-software becomes obvious, even though I have to admit that non-free does not equal to evil and that each non-free-software has bigger or smaller influence on one's personal freedom.
              Steam in this context has a huge influence.

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              • #47
                Originally posted by curaga View Post
                The most recent publicized Mplayer codec vulnerability was in halfway 2011. Dear sir, I really do have my head up my ass. Thank you for attempting to remove it.
                Fixed That For You

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                • #48
                  You don't deserve a reply. Welcome to my ignore list, which currently consists of a single person, you.

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                  • #49
                    The Linux Game Tome

                    On a whim I contacted Michael Simms at on Freenode where he can still be found in spite of not being involved with Linux Games Publishing anymore. I mentioned that The Linux Game Tome has been offline for months. He was surprised by that because he apparently owns the server it is on. It should be available again.

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                    • #50
                      http://linuxgamepublishing.com/

                      http://tuxgames.com

                      Linuxgamepublishing is no more? Can we still get their games somewhere?

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