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A Duo Of Peculiar Games Being Ported To Linux

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  • #11
    Originally posted by dcc24 View Post
    Seriously? Never used a closed-source application? Ever? Or you only hate closed-source Linux applications because they are corrupting the one true free OS?
    Sure, I have.
    I use proprietary software everyday at work. Windows and Visual Studio.

    Personally, I prefer free open source software and at home I run Linux and try to stick to free open source software. I have one or two proprietary software though, I have Steam atm.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by dcc24 View Post
      I hate this and I'm disgusted by all of you zealots hating on everyone who just happen to have a different (read: pragmatic) world view than you.
      I hope you see the irony in this ;-)

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      • #13
        Free Software crusaders running steam... Lord help us....

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        • #14
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          How about they release the source code?
          No, that's what I thought.

          They want free money from the community but they don't want to share the source code with the community, they want to hoard on it themselves.
          Well, you have a point, in any other software industry, if a big company pays for the development of software from scratch, they get the source code, I don't see why it should be different in this case, after all, WE are paying for the development, WE should own the source code, I think its more like a cultural thing, maybe we should start a campaign or something like that.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            No, it's not like pre-ordering a game some weeks before release.

            These people does not have any game.
            Who knows, maybe there wont be any game?

            [further drivel snipped]
            Get yourself informed how Kickstarter works. Or is this beyond your grasp?

            Comment


            • #16
              I think some clarifications about Free Software are needed here.

              Free Software doesn't necessarily mean free price, but the 4 basic freedoms of Free Software the customer/user has:

              The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).

              The freedom to study how the program works, and change it so it does your computing as you wish (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

              The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2).

              The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others (freedom 3). By doing this you can give the whole community a chance to benefit from your changes. Access to the source code is a precondition for this.


              Two examples of companies that make money with Free Software:

              Red Hat: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-sourc...-arrived/10692

              NGINX:

              http://www.zdnet.com/blog/networking...wing-fast/1538

              http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-sourc...soft-iis/10101

              http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-sourc...b-server/10321


              The usual ways of making money with Free Software, are: a) selling a Free Software product itself, b) selling support for a Free Software product, c) crowd funding.


              Some interesting details:

              When you create Free Software for a client, that is not available publicly, it is mandatory only the client having access to the source code of the product, not others.

              If you modify a Free Software program, and you are the only user of the modified program ("you" can also include a company), you are not obliged to provide the modified source code to anyone else.


              If there are any questions about Free Software, I can try to answer them here. :-)

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by Tuxee View Post
                Get yourself informed how Kickstarter works. Or is this beyond your grasp?
                Well, to be honest, Kickstarter does not enforce anything, that is true. Although scamming through it is difficult by nature - you can't really sell an idea if you don't have an idea. And if you have an idea, might as well make it come true once you get the funding. Otherwise you will get banned and nobody will trust you ever again.

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                • #18
                  These games make me think at this, maybe they are really using it? In this case the source is already available (GPL) they should only write the game arts and scripts.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Corrected the broken links:


                    Originally posted by developer View Post
                    I think some clarifications about Free Software are needed here.

                    Free Software doesn't necessarily mean free price, but the 4 basic freedoms of Free Software the customer/user has:

                    The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).

                    The freedom to study how the program works, and change it so it does your computing as you wish (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

                    The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2).

                    The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others (freedom 3). By doing this you can give the whole community a chance to benefit from your changes. Access to the source code is a precondition for this.


                    Two examples of companies that make money with Free Software:

                    Red Hat: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-sourc...-arrived/10692

                    NGINX:

                    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/networking...wing-fast/1538

                    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-sourc...soft-iis/10101

                    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-sourc...b-server/10321


                    The usual ways of making money with Free Software, are: a) selling a Free Software product itself, b) selling support for a Free Software product, c) crowd funding.


                    Some interesting details:

                    When you create Free Software for a client, that is not available publicly, it is mandatory only the client having access to the source code of the product, not others.

                    If you modify a Free Software program, and you are the only user of the modified program ("you" can also include a company), you are not obliged to provide the modified source code to anyone else.


                    If there are any questions about Free Software, I can try to answer them here. :-)

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      Leisure Suit Larry is using the Unity3D engine so it cant be open sourced By reply games as they don't own it. The other game probably uses it too.

                      Comment

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