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  • Originally posted by Scali View Post
    Well, what I meant is that you have no choice. All Apples come with Apple motherboards. They don't even have any overclocking or monitoring functionality as far as I know, so that is one less potential problem.
    Likewise, all Apple motherboards come with onboard audio and software chosen by Apple. There's the other problem solved.
    If you mean, "You have no choice, you always receive the onboard audio controller, drivers, and software providing an audio API to applications when purchasing a Mac", then I think my response would be something like....

    Durrrr-Hurrr-Durrr

    If you meant something different, then you need to try communicating it again, because we're all seriously confused.

    F

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    • Originally posted by russofris View Post
      If you mean, "You have no choice, you always receive the onboard audio controller, drivers, and software providing an audio API to applications when purchasing a Mac", then I think my response would be something like....

      Durrrr-Hurrr-Durrr

      If you meant something different, then you need to try communicating it again, because we're all seriously confused.
      LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL. hilarious

      Scali is also incorrect - you can overclock MacPros and this is widely known, and not something even remotely new ... You can overclock Macbook pros too, but i am not sure if you would want to overclock it (although people do) and overclocking an iMac probably isn't that good of an idea either... I personally wouldn't overclock them, at least not MBP or iMac.

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      • Originally posted by russofris View Post
        If you meant something different, then you need to try communicating it again, because we're all seriously confused.
        No, that was the obvious part. It's about the consequences of that obvious part: Apple selects hardware and software that doesn't have cycle stealing issues, hence end-users never encounter such issues.
        When you buy a PC, it is your own responsibility to select that hardware and software, because there's also a lot of junk around.

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        • Originally posted by ninez View Post
          Scali is also incorrect - you can overclock MacPros and this is widely known, and not something even remotely new
          If you mean to say that it is possible to overclock because Apple uses the exact same CPUs and chipsets that allow you to overclock regular PCs, then I think my response would be something like....

          Durrrr-Hurrr-Durrr

          However, last time I looked, you still need third-party software for this. It doesn't come with OS X itself, let alone pre-installed.
          Where most PC motherboards will have such utilities included on their driver CD.

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          • Originally posted by ninez View Post
            Microsoft doesn't target that market specifically
            Microsoft doesn't really target *ANY* market specifically. I think that exactly is their strength.
            They deliver the most universal system out there. It may not be 'the best' solution for anything, but it is a 'good enough' solution for just about everything. That's what makes Windows so hard to compete with.

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            • Originally posted by gamerk2 View Post
              I said *support*, not *support well*. Yes, if the HW can't handle the low latencies, ASIO4ALL tends to break, for somewhat obvious reasons. And yes, most every soundcard has an ASIO driver these days.
              Yes, it's a catch-22.
              If the hardware can handle low latencies (and full duplex, another requirement), it will have an ASIO driver (ASIO drivers are probably the simplest drivers I've ever written).
              Which means that you only use ASIO4ALL on hardware that can't do what ASIO is meant for in the first place.
              Oh well, it can work as long as you don't do things that require low latency.
              For playback, the latency is not an issue really. And if you're recording, most software will be able to figure out how much delay the ASIO driver is causing, and move your recordings back in time so they end up in the right place, regardless of how much latency you have.
              But things like realtime monitoring or processing... not a chance

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