Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rage Linux Port Is Not Likely Until 2012

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    I did read a couple of the reviews, and the repetitive quests are the only thing that really has me worried. The technical glitches will likely be solved in time, and the rest of the complaints are mostly about it not being "innovative enough", and concentrating on shooting monsters, which is not sexy anymore. What is sexy is open worlds, non-linear puzzle solving, RPG elements, characters coming to grips with their parents' divorce, and musical challenges*. Just look at Prey and then look at what Prey 2 is going to be like, and you will understand what is 'sexy' in FPS games today.

    Perhaps I'm strange, but I like shooting monsters, so if that is what Rage will be like, then there is a chance that I'll enjoy it. I've enjoyed most of id's games so far, so I'll give them a chance. It is certainly possible that it's a stinker, but it deserves a chance.
    From the review on arstechnica:
    "To give you a sense of how ridiculous this game can be, here's a sample mission: my goal is to go to the next town to drop off some supplies. First I have to speak to the mayor, who tells me I need to change out of my conspicuous clothes before he'll talk to me, so I have to find the tailor. No sweat, right? Back to the mayor.

    Once I get my new clothes, the mayor says I have to rent garage space and talk to the sheriff. So I do those things, but the sheriff tells me I can't have the supplies that need to be delivered unless my buggy has guns. To get guns, I need to talk to the guy at the race track. After talking to the guy at the race track, I'm told I need to speak to another guy to set up races for the slips to get the guns—when I find that guy, he tells me to speak to his guy so he can schedule the race...

    It's absurd and pointless. Why can't the first guy just set up the race? What designer sat down and said that the player should have to track down and speak to FOUR PEOPLE to get to the actual action?"

    Definitely not worth my money, but ymmv.
    For mindless shooting, there will be a new Serious Sam soon.

    Comment


    • #32
      Yes, that part sounds lame, and you might be right -- I might hate it.

      But id still has enough credit with me that I'll give it a go -- as long as there is a Linux version I can run. At the very worst, it will be a boring technological marvel.

      I still remember playing Commander Keen II, FFS. Some good memories.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by bug77 View Post
        From the review on arstechnica:
        "To give you a sense of how ridiculous this game can be, here's a sample mission: my goal is to go to the next town to drop off some supplies. First I have to speak to the mayor, who tells me I need to change out of my conspicuous clothes before he'll talk to me, so I have to find the tailor. No sweat, right? Back to the mayor.

        Once I get my new clothes, the mayor says I have to rent garage space and talk to the sheriff. So I do those things, but the sheriff tells me I can't have the supplies that need to be delivered unless my buggy has guns. To get guns, I need to talk to the guy at the race track. After talking to the guy at the race track, I'm told I need to speak to another guy to set up races for the slips to get the guns—when I find that guy, he tells me to speak to his guy so he can schedule the race...

        It's absurd and pointless. Why can't the first guy just set up the race? What designer sat down and said that the player should have to track down and speak to FOUR PEOPLE to get to the actual action?"

        Definitely not worth my money, but ymmv.
        For mindless shooting, there will be a new Serious Sam soon.
        Exactly from that paragraph you can see how biased the author is - if you complain about being send around in the game then you could just ask that all that useless stuff is removed and you start the game at the "game over/finished" screen. We want to be send through the world of the game, complete missions and kill some enemies - this is what games are made for.
        I do understand that the author doesn't like the game - so everything that that prolongates the time he has to play is bad.
        I don't know the game - it probably has a lot of weaknesses. But, the arstechnica review seems to be written with wrong expectations and is not worth reading.

        Just my 2cents

        Comment


        • #34
          rage runs fairly well through wine, with catalyst 11.8.
          tho there are some serious texture poping issues. but those are the same for windows gamers for what i understand.
          now if amd could make that rage performance driver for linux also. i'd be happy.

          native bins would be even better tho.

          Comment


          • #35
            Rage -> epic fail ?

            Great article,
            I only hope it won't be the source for another pile of articles about how Rage is not yet available on Linux.
            Well, the article itself has little to no content. Unless we see a true statement about Rage on Linux I would keep my fingers crossed.
            This "article" might not only be the source for another pile of articles in regard to the "bad status" of Rage on Linux but already manifests itself in the news section of phoronix.

            At least it seems to do so. From: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...item&px=OTk2OA
            With Rage / id Tech 5 not coming soon to Linux, it's easy to call Unigine the most impressive game engine with full Linux support.
            Go figure....

            As for games on Linux I have longly accepted that my / our beloved OS is and probably never will be a big target platform for gaming. You can pretty much count the few top titles on Linux.
            Smaller Indy studios do not count here. It would be definitely nice to get games like Rage on Linux though.

            Any review will hardly reflect your personal opinion on any game. You can only read several reviews and somehow build the average off them to find out how well a game suits your needs.

            I have not played Rage yet and doubt that I will even touch the game unless it will be available for 10€ at the software pyramid. Until then I guess most of the current issues have been solved with the n patches to follow plus performance optimisations have been done (if there are any).

            It is really a pitty to see a company such as ID where demos / shareware versions were the very base of their business are not even providing a tech demo of Rage for either the sole purpose of showing their new game/engine or let user try out how well rage behaves on the systems out there.

            The current issues reveal an (too) early release date. That is cumbersome to see. Esp. from Mr. "It's done when it's done !".

            For now the megalomaniac-super-Texture-streaming-system seems to be epicly failing.

            Gaming-wise there will be people loving Rage because of the "back to the roots" feeling while others are expecting more. While I haven't lived under a rock for the last few years I didn't discover Borderlands since a few weeks before when a good friend sold me a GOTY box he had laying around.
            After roughly 20 hrs of gaming I would say that Borderlands (beside the cellshading graphics) is pretty much what I would have expected from Rage. I am not saying that Rage did copy anything from Borderlands but around only 16-18 hrs single player time for Rage feels kinda strange compared to Borderlands where I haven't even explored 20% off the available ground.
            I am pretty shure that Rage will have the specific ID-game feeling (similar to Quake, Quake 2, Doom) but hey being ID isn't enough anymore today. Stuff like Doom, Heretic or Duke3D were cool back then but simple designed games do not make it anymore. Rage definitely has the ID software bonus though.

            We have games such as Bioshock, Dead Space, Crysis and so on which provided a good combination of atmosphere, great storyline, good looking graphics and all this without requiring bleeding edge hardware.
            Of course I would not expect anything else from an ID Soft game than eating up even the resources of the beefiest machines out there.

            On the open-source drivers site I still see a lot of work to be done. While the radeon drivers (for AMD) are at least somewhat able to catch up with fglrx, nouveau is still a big construction site.
            I highly doubt and would even bet several crates of beer that we will not be able to play something like Rage on Noveau running on decent NVidia hardware in one year (in case Rage will ever make it's way to Linux).

            OK, enough rant !

            -D$

            Comment


            • #36
              Crysis ... atmosphere, great storyline ... without requiring bleeding edge hardware.
              I actually took the post seriously for a while, but this takes the cake

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
                I actually took the post seriously for a while, but this takes the cake
                Well, Crysis had no good atmosphere ?
                Crysis had no storyline (compared to other "great" games) ?
                Crysis requires bleeding edge hardware ?

                ..although I must admit that Crysis is not an as good example as IMO Bioshock or Dead Space were.

                Comment


                • #38
                  When Crysis came out, my colleague took it for a test drive on a 10,000 Euro computer at work -- a 8 core machine with 32 GB RAM and the most powerful Nvidia card available on the market. The computer case needed to be in its own room because of cooling issues.

                  It couldn't run the game smoothly on high settings.

                  Maybe you first played it on today's hardware?

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Darksoul View Post
                    Crysis requires bleeding edge hardware ?
                    lol. Is the pope pedophile? Of course it needed high-end hardware. It refused to deliver playable FPS on anything than the latest and greatest back when it first came out.

                    But it was not as bad as this Witcher 2 piece of unoptimized, 3 FPS crap though.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                      But it was not as bad as this Witcher 2 piece of unoptimized, 3 FPS crap though.
                      What? Witcher2 is butter smooth on my GTX460. All maxed out (without ubersampling, of course) running at 1920x1200. Finished it twice in less than a month after it was out. Now I'd like to play the 2.0 patch, but I have no time

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        LMAO at people expecting a good story out of this game. This is id we're talking about, they're not exactly known for deep and engaging storytelling. Also putting any stock in user reviews on metacritic is rather misguided in my opinion. Metacritic user reviews are notoriously flooded with "OMG THIS IS THE WORST GAME EVAR.! I WANT MY MONEY BACK. DON"T EVAR BUY THIS CRAP 0/10" reviews most of which are probably made by people who never even played the game but are just there to shit on something for the hell of it and to post in ALL CAPS. Now it's true that the game suffers from serious texture pop in when played as stock. I found those issues can be fixed with some tweaking by creating a config file and messing with some values. This is what I used: http://www.dsogaming.com/editorial/r...ical-settings/ With some twiddling and lowering my Anti-Aliasing setting to 4X (honestly while I'm sure that technically there is some difference going from 4X to 8X or 16X anti-aliasing, my eyes can't tell the difference during gameplay) I got it to where the texture pop in occurs fairly rarely and it pops in so quickly (milliseconds) that it's not distracting. Obviously your mileage will vary depending on your hardware and drivers (Phenom II 965BE, GTX460 1GB, 285.05.09 drivers here) and if you have an AMD/ATI card, as with any game running through wine, good luck with that. Not saying it won't work but let's face it the Catalyst driver is notoriously more problematic with programs running through wine than nvidia's blob. I will say this, while I have no problem creating a config file and messing with it or entering console commands, id really should have included some of these adjustments in the in-game options for the many people that aren't comfortable with anything beyond point and clicking. The options they did include are bare-bones to say the least and not nearly adequate.

                        Anyway, from what I've played of the game here's my quick impressions: It's a visually stunning game with silky smooth animations. The draw distance and level of detail is ridiculous, I've only seen one game even come close, The Witcher 2 (I can play TW2 maxed out except ubersampling). The shooter mechanics are top notch, as you'd expect from id, and the driving is surprisingly competent. The game is a lot more open than any previous id game, though it's not exactly Morrowind or Oblivion either. Still it's open enough that you can go dicking around the wastelands in a buggy blowing shit up and catching sick air. It's not on the level of GTA as far as having fun dicking around and doing crazy stunts, but it's nonetheless pretty fun tooling around in the buggy. If you're looking for a great story, look elsewhere, it's just an excuse to send you places to kill things.

                        So to summarize: Great looking game with tight shooter mechanics, surprisingly fun driving, and a throw away story.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                          What? Witcher2 is butter smooth on my GTX460. All maxed out (without ubersampling, of course) running at 1920x1200. Finished it twice in less than a month after it was out. Now I'd like to play the 2.0 patch, but I have no time
                          Core 2 Duo 3.3GHz, Radeon HD4870, 6GB RAM: When all settings are maxed out, I get exactly 3FPS. Yes, a slideshow. The engine of that game is a joke. With minimum settings, I get about 25-30 FPS, which is still a joke.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            That's strange, the 4870 should be about 80% as fast as my GTX460. Unless you have the 512MB version, which may not have enough memory to handle the largest textures. Also, ubersampling is a no-go for pretty much anyone. The game also seems to be CPU dependent so your missing two cores may also have an impact.
                            Oh, and what resolution do you use?

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                              Core 2 Duo 3.3GHz, Radeon HD4870, 6GB RAM: When all settings are maxed out, I get exactly 3FPS. Yes, a slideshow. The engine of that game is a joke. With minimum settings, I get about 25-30 FPS, which is still a joke.
                              Part of that may be due to you running an AMD card. Don't get me wrong, I'm no AMD basher, I like the company and would consider running their video cards (I feel a bit weird running an AMD CPU with a nVidia GPU) were their drivers better. While AMD sometimes puts out better GPU hardware (especially lately), their drivers are notoriously flaky, even on Windows, and the problem is magnified on Linux. Running Catalyst drivers on Linux and trying to run games through wine brings with is a whole other set of problems on top of the problems inherent to getting a game to work through wine. You can look at just about any entry in the wine AppDB or browse through the bug tracker and see a whole slew of issues AMD/ATI card users face while nVidia users far more often than not have smooth sailing, comparatively speaking. It's possible to get games to run well through wine with AMD/ATI cards in many cases, but it often involves extra hoops to jump through.

                              Another thing to consider is, did you update the game? I remember I had wildly inconsistent framerates with my GTX460 1GB with the initial release of the game. In some parts it would be slightly choppy even on low settings while in other parts the game ran buttery smooth even on very high settings. With each subsequent patch the game received, starting with 1.1 which was released a mere week after launch, the issue got better for me to the point that by the time I patched up to 1.3, and subsequently now with the 2.0 release, the game runs silky smooth all the time at 1920x1200 with "Ultra" settings, minus of course Ubersampling, but you need a supercomputer to run the game with Ubersampling.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I already finished the game in minimum settings. It was still very fun, but the graphics sucked hard. I pay more attention to gameplay and story in RPGs (hell, I even still play text adventures on a regular basis), so it was still an extremely good game for me; didn't feel like GOG ripped me off or something. But man, those were really some shit-ugly graphics playing at minimum :P No matter how I think about it, a C2D running at 3.3GHz with a 512MB 4870 and 6 gigs of RAM should deliver *awesome* graphics (you should see how Mass Effect 1&2 looks here, simply amazing.) If not, then there's really no excuse for the 3D engine. Simply poor implementation.

                                My 4870 btw has 512MB RAM and I played at 1920x1080.
                                Last edited by RealNC; 10-07-2011, 02:23 PM.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X