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  • Linux Gaming: Native vs. Wine vs. Windows 7 Performance

    Phoronix: Linux Gaming: Native vs. Wine vs. Windows 7 Performance

    Linux gaming has a bright future ahead with the forthcoming Unigine games, successful indie campaigns, and many other Linux-native game titles being just out on the horizon. Right now though if you are a dedicated PC gamer looking to satisfy your entertainment appetite under Linux, more than likely you find yourself using the Wine program so that you can run many Windows programs under Linux. What is the performance impact though of using this method? In this article, we have a couple benchmarks comparing the performance of Wine, native Linux game binaries, and the native Microsoft Windows 7 Professional performance.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=15567

  • #2
    Michael, before you start testing "Direct3D-rendered games" and draw any conclusions about WinAPP[Direct3D] -> Wine -> Linux[OpenGL], please, remember that Wine's DirectX implementation may be incomplete.

    Thus the same game may run faster under Linux/Wine than it runs natively only because Wine doesn't completely pass through all DirectX calls into OpenGL calls.

    So, IMO such an article just ... doesn't make any sense at all - unless you also compare graphics quality (pixel by pixel).

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    • #3
      With Urban Terror, the Ubuntu Linux performance again came out ahead of Windows 7.
      Your graph shows WIndows 7 being faster at Urban Terror, not Ubuntu.

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      • #4
        Testing games that are natively available for Linux does not make much sense in my opinion, as nobody is interested in running them with Wine. What about comparing games from the Wine Platinum and Gold top lists? http://appdb.winehq.org/

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        • #5
          One conclusion is that Wine 1.3.9 is consistently slower than 1.2.1. I wonder if the Wine project would appreciate a fps regression bisect.

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          • #6
            Interesting.
            Could you also test an AMD gfx with the proprietary driver?
            Could you also add the CPU usage?

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            • #7
              How do you do to make the UrbanTerror exceed 125 fps, which is the limit of the game engine?
              You measure fps much higher than 125 fps, how? using a modified version of the game?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chol View Post
                Testing games that are natively available for Linux does not make much sense in my opinion, as nobody is interested in running them with Wine. What about comparing games from the Wine Platinum and Gold top lists? http://appdb.winehq.org/
                Read the article... it's explained.
                Michael Larabel
                http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                • #9
                  nice test, want more

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by photon View Post
                    How do you do to make the UrbanTerror exceed 125 fps, which is the limit of the game engine?
                    You measure fps much higher than 125 fps, how? using a modified version of the game?
                    Run the Phoronix Test Suite.
                    Michael Larabel
                    http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KDesk View Post
                      Interesting.
                      Could you also test an AMD gfx with the proprietary driver?
                      Could you also add the CPU usage?
                      Depending upon interest level / impression count of this article.
                      Michael Larabel
                      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                      • #12
                        The Heaven native results look strange too me, on my sytem it's a bit different:


                        Linux OGL ~ FPS: 33.3 / Scores: 839 / Min FPS: 22.7
                        Windows OGL ~ FPS: 31.7 / Scores: 798 / Min FPS: 21.9
                        Windows DX11 ~ FPS: 30.6 / Scores: 770 / Min FPS: 20.9
                        ____________________________

                        Mode: 1920x1080 fullscreen
                        Shaders: high
                        Textures: high
                        Filter: trilinear
                        Anisotropy: 4x
                        Occlusion: enabled
                        Refraction: enabled
                        Volumetric: enabled
                        Replication: disabled
                        Tessellation: normal
                        ____________________________________________

                        Binary: Linux 64bit GCC 4.3.2 Release May 20 2010
                        Binary: Windows 32bit Visual C++ 1500 Release May 21 2010
                        Operating system: Linux 2.6.36-2.dmz.5-liquorix-amd64 x86_64
                        Operating system: Windows 7 (build 7600) 64bit
                        CPU model: AMD Athlon(tm) II X3 450 Processor
                        CPU flags: 3199MHz MMX+ 3DNow!+ SSE SSE2 SSE3 SSE4A HTT
                        GPU model: GeForce GTX 460 PCI Express 260.19.29 1024Mb
                        GPU model: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 8.17.12.6590 1024Mb

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Michael View Post
                          Read the article... it's explained.
                          Sorry, I only read the first section as I was crazy about the results. Do you already have in mind, which further games you are going to test?

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                          • #14
                            @Licaon

                            Usually Anisotropy is set to 16 in linux.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kano View Post
                              @Licaon
                              Usually Anisotropy is set to 16 in linux.
                              That's not the point as long as the same settings are used for comparison.

                              Windows OGL in WINE ~ FPS: 33.1 / Scores: 835 / Min FPS: 22.6

                              On the other hand why do tests 7/10/12 show only a black screen in Linux in both native Linux 64bit OpenGL and Windows 32bit WINE OpenGL? ( at least on nVidia )

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