Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Linux Gaming: Native vs. Wine vs. Windows 7 Performance

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
    The 9800GTX is a 512MB card, right? The way it nosedives at 1920x1080 in Michael's test makes me wonder if it's hitting that memory limitation. The only thing that's weird is that I'm a little surprised that the Windows OpenGL implementation wouldn't when the Linux one did, so perhaps that's not it after all.
    When you hit a memory limitation you fps generally drop to if your lucky 1 to 2 fps. I hit that limit lots when doing a bunch of SLi bug fixing with nvidia back when I was running dual 8800GT's (SLi adds additional overhead that would just go over the 512 megs of ram on the cards). The same thing in windows would happen as well to the same crawling results. Interestingly enough when you ran SLi in DX mode it would not hit that same memory limit. It also seemed to be limited to Ungines benchmarks.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by DoDoENT View Post
      I tried on my GTX470 and windows results were better. I used the same settings as you, except that I set tessellation to extreme.
      Extreme it is:

      Linux 32bit OpenGL ~ FPS: 19.5 / Scores: 492 / Min FPS: 10.7
      Windows 32bit OpenGL in WINE ~ FPS: 19.5 / Scores: 491 / Min FPS: 10.7
      Windows 32bit OpenGL ~ FPS: 19.1 / Scores: 481 / Min FPS: 10.7
      Windows 32bit DX11 ~ FPS: 18.8 / Scores: 473 / Min FPS: 10.7

      ____________________________

      Mode: 1920x1080 4xAA fullscreen
      Shaders: high
      Textures: high
      Filter: trilinear
      Anisotropy: 16x
      Occlusion: enabled
      Refraction: enabled
      Volumetric: enabled
      Replication: disabled
      Tessellation: extreme
      ____________________________________________

      Binary: Linux 32bit GCC 4.3.2 Release May 20 2010
      Binary: Windows 32bit Visual C++ 1500 Release May 21 2010
      Operating system: Linux 2.6.36-2.dmz.5-liquorix-amd64 x86_64
      Operating system: Windows 7 (build 7600) 64bit
      CPU model: AMD Athlon(tm) II X3 450 Processor
      CPU flags: 3200MHz MMX+ 3DNow!+ SSE SSE2 SSE3 SSE4A HTT
      GPU model: GeForce GTX 460 PCI Express 260.19.29 1024Mb
      GPU model: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 8.17.12.6590 1024Mb

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Shining Arcanine View Post
        Your graph shows WIndows 7 being faster at Urban Terror, not Ubuntu.
        There you go letting facts cloud your judgment again.

        Comment


        • #34
          Thanks for showing the progress of Linux gaming!

          It is the only parameter holding back Linux domination.

          Comment


          • #35
            I do quite a bit of gaming under GNU/Linux. I've listed some of the games I've finished under WINE here:
            http://systemsaviour.com/?page_id=161

            I'm running a i7 950/GTX480 setup, but even so this is a great topic to look at. I know a long time ago WINE had a huge performance hit on lots of the games I played. Either that's not the case these days, or my newer hardware generally makes any difference unnoticeable. I'm interested to know which.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by sabriah View Post
              Thanks for showing the progress of Linux gaming!

              It is the only parameter holding back Linux domination.
              It's not the only thing, but it is a big piece of the puzzle.

              Comment


              • #37
                The OpenGL performance in Wine CAN be identical to Windows under certain circumstances, but by default not in all cases. Our OpenGL code contains locking code around each function call (needed for thread safety). This means that if an OpenGL application (usually older applications which do a lot of stuff on the CPU and make tons of GL calls) can be a little slower. I suspect this is the case in OpenArena, but in my past experience the locking didn't affect performance more than lets say 10%, but perhaps it can be worse here in Quake3 based games. (Did you test without sound?) Anyway under normal conditions as you see in things like Heaven performance is the same.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Thunderbird View Post
                  The OpenGL performance in Wine CAN be identical to Windows under certain circumstances, but by default not in all cases. Our OpenGL code contains locking code around each function call (needed for thread safety). This means that if an OpenGL application (usually older applications which do a lot of stuff on the CPU and make tons of GL calls) can be a little slower. I suspect this is the case in OpenArena, but in my past experience the locking didn't affect performance more than lets say 10%, but perhaps it can be worse here in Quake3 based games. (Did you test without sound?) Anyway under normal conditions as you see in things like Heaven performance is the same.
                  The locks are necessary to support multithreaded D3D devices.

                  Unigine is 100% GPU-bound at extreme settings, so the impact of the locking remains hidden. Quake3 is 100% CPU-bound, so the difference is most pronounced. In general, most games will fall somewhere between these two extremes.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Colours

                    Thanks a million for your excellent reviews and benchnak testings. I als way appreciate them!

                    I hav just one point that pains me and shurely 20% of the male viewers of your reports. 20% of all men have a red/green colour weakness. this means to view the charts with red and green (and often brown) lines can not be seen by us.

                    Please have mercy on us and use mor distintive colours. My I humbly suggest blue, orange, red (or brown or green [one of those is fine but not two or all]) black, white, gray.

                    If you even want to get one step better use different kinds of lines: dotted, hyphens, dot hypen dot etc.

                    I know we make up only 1/8th of the worlds population, but still be so kind and do not discriminate against a minority of 800 million people.

                    Thanks in advance!
                    Fundi

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by mjung View Post
                      Thanks a million for your excellent reviews and benchnak testings. I als way appreciate them!

                      I hav just one point that pains me and shurely 20% of the male viewers of your reports. 20% of all men have a red/green colour weakness. this means to view the charts with red and green (and often brown) lines can not be seen by us.

                      Please have mercy on us and use mor distintive colours. My I humbly suggest blue, orange, red (or brown or green [one of those is fine but not two or all]) black, white, gray.

                      If you even want to get one step better use different kinds of lines: dotted, hyphens, dot hypen dot etc.

                      I know we make up only 1/8th of the worlds population, but still be so kind and do not discriminate against a minority of 800 million people.

                      Thanks in advance!
                      Fundi
                      Patches against pts_Graph and graph-config.xml welcome by your or others that improve the color scheme or make any other visual improvements... http://www.phoronix-test-suite.com/
                      Michael Larabel
                      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by deanjo View Post
                        It's not the only thing, but it is a big piece of the puzzle.
                        The other much bigger piece, that makes every other piece undistinguishable to the naked eye, being the fact that almost every single personal computer(*) bought in the last 18 years (or so) comes with windows pre-installed and there is no choice of not having it installed.

                        (*) except the ones from apple; oh wait, those aren't PCs, but Macs.... my bad.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Michael View Post
                          Patches against pts_Graph and graph-config.xml welcome by your or others that improve the color scheme or make any other visual improvements... http://www.phoronix-test-suite.com/
                          Thanks for replying. I sent them a message just now. Unfortunately I can not help with the coding. But I wondered if colours in that test suite would be freely configurable?

                          So long
                          Fundi

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            These are the benchmarks I like to see. Only complaint is that I didn't get to see any games that used Direct3d. Windows usually does better with D3D, while Wine does horrible with D3D.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by devius View Post
                              (*) except the ones from apple; oh wait, those aren't PCs, but Macs.... my bad.
                              you do realise they use off the shelf Intel/AMD/nVidia components in Mac now, right?

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by devius View Post
                                The other much bigger piece, that makes every other piece undistinguishable to the naked eye, being the fact that almost every single personal computer(*) bought in the last 18 years (or so) comes with windows pre-installed and there is no choice of not having it installed.

                                (*) except the ones from apple; oh wait, those aren't PCs, but Macs.... my bad.
                                No, not even close. Other big factors stopping mass adoption is fragmentation among the distros, lack of specialty apps (if there is one you are usually limited to 1 or 2 choices that are usually pretty rough), having to still revert to command line for some pretty basic stuff not needed in other systems, lack of a stable base libraries (meaning distro A uses this version of libraries and distro B uses these versions) and of course tons of marketing.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X