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Humble Indie Bundle #2 Just Made One Million Bucks

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  • #16
    For those on Mac/Windows, they're now giving out steam activation codes for the second bundle. Desura too, which is likely to get released for Linux before Steam does.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Wyatt View Post
      How are you defining negligible? In what world is $250,000 negligible? Wait....are you a Republican!? :P
      $250,000 is nothing. Well, it depends on what you need it for.

      $250,000 is a lot, in fact, far too much, if you just need to get some groceries.
      $250,000 is plenty to buy a car.
      $250,000 is reasonable to buy a very, very fast car.
      $250,000 is OK to buy a house.
      $250,000 can be enough to shoot a decent movie, but you're going to have limitations.
      $250,000 is too little for a marketing budget for most countries.
      $250,000 will pay for YouTube's bandwidth bill for approximately 6 hours.
      $250,000 is one drop of water in a bucket for the national debt of The Netherlands.
      $250,000 is one water molecule in a bucket for the national debt of the United States.

      So how much is $250,000 in terms of game development? Well, to get someone to work here (The Netherlands), you have to pay minimum wage at least. That'll be 16800 a year. Plus vacation money (I'm not sure how to translate vakantiebijslag correctly), which is 8%. It's pretty much money you save up for periods when you don't work. Total: 18144. By law you can't pay anyone who works for you less.

      That's almost a million dollars.. Oh wait, exchange rate is not that bad. It'll be almost $24,000 (EUR/USD 1.3171). So say you have 7 guys/gals working on a game for 18 months. 23897*7*1.5=$250919 just to pay everyone minimum wage. This does not include a building or something to house the programmers. This does not include licenses needed for the game for engines, codecs, music used, etc. This does not include the money PayPal or other payment service eats. It doesn't include VAT paid over sales either. This does not include bandwidth. This does not include hardware and other required equipment. It doesn't really include anthing, it's just a bunch of blokes/gals working for minimum wage.

      It's a probably a nice bonus, but they're not swimming in the money like uncle scrooge.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by W3ird_N3rd View Post
        $250,000 is nothing. Well, it depends on what you need it for.

        $250,000 is a lot, in fact, far too much, if you just need to get some groceries.
        $250,000 is plenty to buy a car.
        $250,000 is reasonable to buy a very, very fast car.
        $250,000 is OK to buy a house.
        $250,000 can be enough to shoot a decent movie, but you're going to have limitations.
        $250,000 is too little for a marketing budget for most countries.
        $250,000 will pay for YouTube's bandwidth bill for approximately 6 hours.
        $250,000 is one drop of water in a bucket for the national debt of The Netherlands.
        $250,000 is one water molecule in a bucket for the national debt of the United States.

        So how much is $250,000 in terms of game development? Well, to get someone to work here (The Netherlands), you have to pay minimum wage at least. That'll be 16800 a year. Plus vacation money (I'm not sure how to translate vakantiebijslag correctly), which is 8%. It's pretty much money you save up for periods when you don't work. Total: 18144. By law you can't pay anyone who works for you less.

        That's almost a million dollars.. Oh wait, exchange rate is not that bad. It'll be almost $24,000 (EUR/USD 1.3171). So say you have 7 guys/gals working on a game for 18 months. 23897*7*1.5=$250919 just to pay everyone minimum wage. This does not include a building or something to house the programmers. This does not include licenses needed for the game for engines, codecs, music used, etc. This does not include the money PayPal or other payment service eats. It doesn't include VAT paid over sales either. This does not include bandwidth. This does not include hardware and other required equipment. It doesn't really include anthing, it's just a bunch of blokes/gals working for minimum wage.

        It's a probably a nice bonus, but they're not swimming in the money like uncle scrooge.
        I heard that Svartalf will work for empty beer bottles that he can return for deposit.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by W3ird_N3rd View Post
          $250,000 is nothing. Well, it depends on what you need it for.

          $250,000 is a lot, in fact, far too much, if you just need to get some groceries.
          $250,000 is plenty to buy a car.
          $250,000 is reasonable to buy a very, very fast car.
          $250,000 is OK to buy a house.
          $250,000 can be enough to shoot a decent movie, but you're going to have limitations.
          $250,000 is too little for a marketing budget for most countries.
          $250,000 will pay for YouTube's bandwidth bill for approximately 6 hours.
          $250,000 is one drop of water in a bucket for the national debt of The Netherlands.
          $250,000 is one water molecule in a bucket for the national debt of the United States.

          So how much is $250,000 in terms of game development? Well, to get someone to work here (The Netherlands), you have to pay minimum wage at least. That'll be 16800 a year. Plus vacation money (I'm not sure how to translate vakantiebijslag correctly), which is 8%. It's pretty much money you save up for periods when you don't work. Total: 18144. By law you can't pay anyone who works for you less.

          That's almost a million dollars.. Oh wait, exchange rate is not that bad. It'll be almost $24,000 (EUR/USD 1.3171). So say you have 7 guys/gals working on a game for 18 months. 23897*7*1.5=$250919 just to pay everyone minimum wage. This does not include a building or something to house the programmers. This does not include licenses needed for the game for engines, codecs, music used, etc. This does not include the money PayPal or other payment service eats. It doesn't include VAT paid over sales either. This does not include bandwidth. This does not include hardware and other required equipment. It doesn't really include anthing, it's just a bunch of blokes/gals working for minimum wage.

          It's a probably a nice bonus, but they're not swimming in the money like uncle scrooge.
          That is all very well, but not really the point.
          The question is : how much more did it cost the developpers to support Linux.
          If it was more than 250k$ (all charges included) then it was not worth it, otherwise... that's added revenue !
          Anyway, I can't see how one fourth of sales revenue can be considered negligible.

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          • #20
            Well you know, 4 times 250,000 is not going to be enough either. Especially if you have to share it with 5 other teams and two charities. Can't conclude from these figures that game development as a job is dead.

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            • #21
              And on a more positive note, They are now offering the first bundle to anyone who pays (or has payed) more than the total average So, that means that I'm no longer sorry I missed the first bundle. Very nice on their part!

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              • #22
                Just out of curiosity - are HIB licences transferable? I mean, if in a few months I met sb that didn't hear about HIB before, could I give to them my licence key for HIB1 (deleting it from my mails etc.) as now I have an additional HIB1 licence contained within HIB2?

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                • #23
                  Was the average at some point below $5? My friend paid just it and she has HIB1 links on her site, too.

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                  • #24
                    I think everybody got the extra games from the first bundle, well i had em already but i think thats a nice idea

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                    • #25
                      Everyone who ordered before the HIB1 games were added gets them. Only people who are ordering after they were added need to pay above average.

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                      • #26
                        I'm loving this year's bundle. I'm already addicted to 3 of the games, and the other 2 are pretty darn fun. Last year's bundle was fun (especially the standout World of Goo), but there was a bit too much "beta-ness" in it.

                        I'm sick and tired of multiplayer FPS games. I've been playing them for decades. Now they bore the crap out of me. Every new game announcement I read about for Linux seems to revolve around yet another damn FPS frag fest. This bundle is refreshing in its lack of FPS fragging, and I'm really looking forward to the upcoming OilRush game too.

                        And for those idiots debating the value of the bundle's revenue... who cares? This is supposed to be a charity and fund drive, not these companies' sole source of income. Stop turning this into a philosophical debate and just have fun with it.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by GoremanX View Post
                          year's bundle was fun (especially the standout World of Goo), but there was a bit too much "beta-ness" in it.
                          What do you mean by "beta-ness"?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by m_gol View Post
                            Just out of curiosity - are HIB licences transferable? I mean, if in a few months I met sb that didn't hear about HIB before, could I give to them my licence key for HIB1 (deleting it from my mails etc.) as now I have an additional HIB1 licence contained within HIB2?
                            Of course - there's no DRM, so as long as you're being honest, you can send your active HIB1 download link to someone else, or just send them the install files you've downloaded.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by grantek View Post
                              Of course - there's no DRM, so as long as you're being honest, you can send your active HIB1 download link to someone else, or just send them the install files you've downloaded.
                              Actually, DRM has nothing to do with it, I'm just asking about potential licence issues, I wouldn't like to break some rules.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by m_gol View Post
                                What do you mean by "beta-ness"?
                                Lugaru was far from polished, or at least that's how it seemed on my computer. Same with a couple other games. World of Goo was as polished as can be, though.

                                Mind you, Cortex Command is pretty "beta" too Most of the modes don't even work!

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