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It's Official: Valve Releasing Steam, Source Engine For Linux!

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  • #61
    Clearing that up...

    Originally posted by whizse View Post
    This is a bit worrying:


    From https://support.steampowered.com/kb_...5376-EOSB-3763

    Considering that the same games are supported in Windows (and works fine in Linux with Wine). But maybe the drivers on the Mac are that much worse?

    The problem is OpenGL support. Intel graphics cards perform well enough on Windows for DirectX, but they only support OpenGL hardware acceleration up to OpenGL 1.2. Games like the HL2 series need hardware acceleration to function. Unfortunately, most laptops these days come with Intel GMAs because of cost, and hence some people think that gaming on Linux is a lost cause when the game simply fails to display.


    I've gotten in the habit of building my own computers to run Linux. nVidia and ATI have never let me down.

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    • #62
      I still don't see an official post from Valve. Nothing is official Phronix. Please provide real dependable sources.

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      • #63
        Hey guys lets get some free page hits by claiming its official when there is absolutely nothing official about this shit at all.

        This is nonsense. Its not official until Valve makes it official.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by Jimbo View Post
          It is the beginning of linux world domination.
          Amenhotep FTW!

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          • #65
            Originally posted by GNU/Blind View Post
            You referring to the tiny little stuffed penguin? in amongst iPods, iPads and other iFaggotry?

            http://aliceteh.com/photos/Madagascar_Penguin.jpg

            So Steam is coming to Madagascar?!

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            • #66
              Anyone notice the jobs listing?

              Valve is advertising for a senior programmer. On looking at the info, 'Windows and Linux platforms' are specifically mentioned:

              http://www.valvesoftware.com/jobs/SenProgrammer.html

              More evidence for Linux support?? ... I guess that could be just for the server apps though.

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              • #67
                Dunno about you, but I'm NOT happy Linux can't get a port of something on its own merit and has to ride the iFag wave. Porting stuff to Apple software could just drive more people to use this horrible evil. :/

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by QuaveringGrape View Post
                  The problem is OpenGL support. Intel graphics cards perform well enough on Windows for DirectX, but they only support OpenGL hardware acceleration up to OpenGL 1.2. Games like the HL2 series need hardware acceleration to function. Unfortunately, most laptops these days come with Intel GMAs because of cost, and hence some people think that gaming on Linux is a lost cause when the game simply fails to display.


                  I've gotten in the habit of building my own computers to run Linux. nVidia and ATI have never let me down.
                  As I mentioned, Valve supports these game on the same hardware in Windows, so my question was if the driver support on the Mac is that much worse...

                  It makes me worry that they will block anyone from using Mesa drivers too, once the Linux stuff is released.

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                  • #69
                    Linux distributions and the Linux foundation have failed for years in creating a real cross-distribution way to install third party software, which en plus can be updated in a few steps. In 2006, a former member of the packing group wrote that (software installation) "won't suck in the future" (http://ianmurdock.com/linux/software...ration-part-2/). That status quo has not changed since.

                    What Valve is now basically doing with Steam is pretty smart, as Steam will become THE gaming platform on Linux. Every game-creator who wants his game to be available on Linux will use Steam, because all users who want to play will install Steam first and look at the content that is available there.

                    Honestly, I do not know if this is that good.
                    But basically, the Linux foundation has failed such a thing for years which is a little bit frustrating.

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by pirast View Post
                      Linux distributions and the Linux foundation have failed for years in creating a real cross-distribution way to install third party software, which en plus can be updated in a few steps. In 2006, a former member of the packing group wrote that (software installation) "won't suck in the future" (http://ianmurdock.com/linux/software...ration-part-2/). That status quo has not changed since.

                      What Valve is now basically doing with Steam is pretty smart, as Steam will become THE gaming platform on Linux. Every game-creator who wants his game to be available on Linux will use Steam, because all users who want to play will install Steam first and look at the content that is available there.

                      Honestly, I do not know if this is that good.
                      But basically, the Linux foundation has failed such a thing for years which is a little bit frustrating.
                      This problem will not be solved until there is one canonical package repository, from which everybody gets the main bulk of their packages. Like how Ubuntu does it now with Debian. I'd say, let Debian be the universal packager, but I guess the RPM folk don't like that.

                      Then there is the cadence proposal of Shuttleworth, which will make it much easier for ISVs to depend on distribution libraries. But I guess the Ubuntu haters don't like that.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Remco View Post
                        This problem will not be solved until there is one canonical package repository, from which everybody gets the main bulk of their packages. Like how Ubuntu does it now with Debian. I'd say, let Debian be the universal packager, but I guess the RPM folk don't like that.

                        Then there is the cadence proposal of Shuttleworth, which will make it much easier for ISVs to depend on distribution libraries. But I guess the Ubuntu haters don't like that.
                        I will attempt to ignore the trolling comments there....
                        Companies can support specific distros quite easily - and this is likely the route Valve will take if they ever decide to officially release Steam for Linux. Unsupported distros are likely to still work, however if a certain library version gets in the way, that's just tough. This is the route AMD have taken with the fglrx drivers.
                        There is no need to have some magical repository for all distros - if you'd really like something such as that, go use windows.

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by mirv View Post
                          if you'd really like something such as that, go use windows.
                          This is true. And everyone does. That's the problem.

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by pirast View Post
                            Linux distributions and the Linux foundation have failed for years in creating a real cross-distribution way to install third party software, which en plus can be updated in a few steps. In 2006, a former member of the packing group wrote that (software installation) "won't suck in the future" (http://ianmurdock.com/linux/software...ration-part-2/). That status quo has not changed since.

                            What Valve is now basically doing with Steam is pretty smart, as Steam will become THE gaming platform on Linux. Every game-creator who wants his game to be available on Linux will use Steam, because all users who want to play will install Steam first and look at the content that is available there.

                            Honestly, I do not know if this is that good.
                            But basically, the Linux foundation has failed such a thing for years which is a little bit frustrating.
                            No, because this would mean next to no money gained for the developers, being held in a jail (steam: you are not allowed to play this game anymore you bought with your hard earned cash because we say so! *evil laugh*), not being able to play without Internet connection (steam: single player? that's for n00bs!) and being riddled by DRM. No, this is definitely not the future, and lucky us it will not be.

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by susikala View Post
                              Dunno about you, but I'm NOT happy Linux can't get a port of something on its own merit and has to ride the iFag wave. Porting stuff to Apple software could just drive more people to use this horrible evil. :/
                              Lol, you think because they charge more for their products yet work hard to re-design lots of elements they are evil? Let me show you something actually evil:




                              There is nothing wrong with developing for Mac OS as well as Nix/Win. It's coming, so what's the big deal?

                              There has been plenty of evidence to support that it's coming. Furthermore it is arguably the most requested thing on their forums.

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                              • #75
                                Steam coming to GNU/Linux is TERRIBLE news, that anyone that values computing freedom of any kind should protest.

                                Steam heavily uses DRM and Product Activation. While your game isn't linked to your particular computer, it is linked to your Steam account. There is no (legal) way to do a completely offline install of most Steam games, even if they are purchased from a retail outlet in physical packaing. The content of the discs is encrypted, and the Steam client decrypts them (which it won't do if you don't have a Steam account). Bypassing this encryption is illegal in the United States due to the DMCA.

                                Sure, one could argue that Steam isn't as oppressive as other DRM implimentations. But it is still DRM! I have no objection to proprietary non-free games in GNU/Linux, but only if they can be used without technological restrictions by those that legally and legitimately purchase them.

                                Steam coming to GNU/Linux will no doubt help bring over more Windows gamers to Linux, which on one hand is possibly a good thing. However if the Linux community starts looking the other way when products are released with DRM and Product Activation, developers will follow the same path they do on Windows and MacOS: they'll start using DRM and Product Activation, because they think customers will put up with it.

                                I'm tired of people acting like DRM is a way of life that can't be helped. It CAN be stopped, but only if we all stop supporting products that impliment it.

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