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It's Official: Valve Releasing Steam, Source Engine For Linux!

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  • PayPal *can* really be a bitch sometimes, but nowadays it works for me (just wouldn't use it to buy 1000+ stuff with it). But you can also use ClickandBuy with Steam AFAIK and it works reliable.

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    • Well if it can be trouble, I'll stay clear of paypal. No sense in risking such things when I don't have to.
      I'll look into things again if steam actually comes to linux.

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      • I don't have a credit card but whenever I must have to use a credit card in order to buy something I do the magic trick.

        Luckily there are service on the web that allows you to pay with iDeal (some government covered pay system in the netherlands, europe) to that webservice/company and they will pay on behalf for you the money with a credit card system. It is safe because all banks in my country use it and cover it. So when I pay for something I didn't get I can contact them, they will contact their contacts and check it with some international agency and...

        Long story short: I pay a company to pay for me. When they don't pay for me the money will magically return to my account. Banks will simply reverse the transfer.

        Whatever else happens is some fsckup up shit for that company. *knock knock*

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        • Just get a prepaid credit card, they sell them just about everywhere. Even the local gas station chain around here sells them.

          They work just like normal credit cards.

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          • Originally posted by mirv View Post
            Is it really that bad?
            Yes. They've done quite a few shifty things in the past. I'm none too happy about Google Checkout either- but they've not done dodgy things to their customers like PayPal's done even in recent times.

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            • Originally posted by pfunkman View Post
              Just get a prepaid credit card, they sell them just about everywhere. Even the local gas station chain around here sells them.

              They work just like normal credit cards.
              They're not offered everywhere- else I'd suggest people use that as at least you're dealing with a Bank and they've explicit rules for this sort of thing.

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              • Use a debit card?

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                • Originally posted by pfunkman View Post
                  Just get a prepaid credit card, they sell them just about everywhere. Even the local gas station chain around here sells them.

                  They work just like normal credit cards.
                  Ah yes, I had forgotten about those. Pretty sure the bank I use will sell them (yep, just checked, it does). Cheers for that!

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                  • Originally posted by yogi_berra View Post
                    Also some studios will compile their games on Linux just to provide better code with no plans what-so-ever of releasing that client.
                    There is no evidence to suggest anything to the contrary.
                    Well...
                    I'm not saying this doesn't happen, but it would have to be exceedingly rare. First of all, most studios don't consider Linux to be anywhere near a viable platform - hell, most studios are just now again seeing Windows as a viable platform, which is in no small part thanks to Valve and Steam. Linux is somewhat widely used for things like video and audio editing and post processing, offline rendering, etc. As an actual target for game development (released or not), not so much, and I know this first-hand. This is why the possibility of Steam coming to the platform is such a big deal, and I happen to think it may well be very good for Valve to be the first.
                    But I have yet to see a first or second tier studio that does PC development do hands-on Linux development of their titles as well.

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                    • Originally posted by Dodger View Post
                      But I have yet to see a first or second tier studio that does PC development do hands-on Linux development of their titles as well.
                      Well...I guess you've never seen iD or (until recently...we won't get into the recent debacle as it's becoming clear what happened there...) Epic, then.

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                      • Originally posted by Dodger View Post
                        Well...
                        I'm not saying this doesn't happen, but it would have to be exceedingly rare. First of all, most studios don't consider Linux to be anywhere near a viable platform - hell, most studios are just now again seeing Windows as a viable platform, which is in no small part thanks to Valve and Steam. Linux is somewhat widely used for things like video and audio editing and post processing, offline rendering, etc. As an actual target for game development (released or not), not so much, and I know this first-hand. This is why the possibility of Steam coming to the platform is such a big deal, and I happen to think it may well be very good for Valve to be the first.
                        But I have yet to see a first or second tier studio that does PC development do hands-on Linux development of their titles as well.
                        What use is a Steam for Linux for game developers? What keeps game devs from making Linux versions of their games is time and money. They have to port it and porting equals to costs and time expenses (for business suits). You can not simply put your Windows game on Steam and "poof" it works on Linux. This is the main problem and Steam does nothing about that. So it's no big deal and is not going to improve Linux gaming much at all since it doesn't solve the inherent problem.

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                        • Originally posted by Dragonlord View Post
                          What use is a Steam for Linux for game developers? What keeps game devs from making Linux versions of their games is time and money. They have to port it and porting equals to costs and time expenses (for business suits). You can not simply put your Windows game on Steam and "poof" it works on Linux. This is the main problem and Steam does nothing about that. So it's no big deal and is not going to improve Linux gaming much at all since it doesn't solve the inherent problem.
                          1. A Linux version of Steamworks and the Source engine reduces the time and money required for porting, which makes it more likely for Linux ports to be made.
                          2. It's a well-known distribution channel. Where do your customers go to buy the latest Linux games?

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                          • Originally posted by Dragonlord View Post
                            What use is a Steam for Linux for game developers?
                            It is where allmost all PC gamers are at and where a shitload of PC users exclusively buy their games from. You might want to sell you 'product' in a place where most potential customers come?

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                            • Originally posted by Svartalf View Post
                              Well...I guess you've never seen iD or (until recently...we won't get into the recent debacle as it's becoming clear what happened there...) Epic, then.
                              Touche. And you're right, of course, but they haven't done anything in what seems like ages. I know Rage is supposed to get Linux binaries, but that's also something that is, I would say, at least one to two years out. But, you are correct.

                              My point, though, was simply that it's a rare thing. And studios developing for Linux to keep portability an option, and not releasing their Linux binaries, is even rarer.

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                              • Originally posted by Dragonlord View Post
                                What use is a Steam for Linux for game developers? What keeps game devs from making Linux versions of their games is time and money. They have to port it and porting equals to costs and time expenses (for business suits). You can not simply put your Windows game on Steam and "poof" it works on Linux. This is the main problem and Steam does nothing about that. So it's no big deal and is not going to improve Linux gaming much at all since it doesn't solve the inherent problem.
                                First of all, Source is a solid, proven Engine to build games on - not state-of-the-art in all respects, but solid. And no, porting is still not a magic snap-your-fingers process, but having something like Source (or Unreal, in its time) makes this process tremendously easier. If file handling and asset management, scripting, rendering, networking, etc., are all done by the engine in a platform agnostic manner, porting becomes a *much* simpler matter.
                                As for Steam itself, it's a solid, proven distribution platform with currently over 25M users. It's *the* digital distribution platform for PC games. Publishers know its DRM works (not getting into the debate, but it is important to them so it's important for the platform). Users know its DRM is reasonably unintrusive. Developers know it's easy to get games set up for it, tie it in with their achievement and stats tracking systems, and maintenance in terms of patches, updates and DLC is a snap. Steam is a big deal - as I said, it's in no small part responsible for a number of big studios and publishers picking up the PC business again that had almost completely abandoned it.

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