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Valve Is Not Commenting On Steam, Source Engine For Linux

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  • #16
    Originally posted by ModplanMan View Post
    The DRM and the other backup and re-download features are entirely separate of the DRM. You do not need a DRM system to allow these things.

    But overall, I agree. I myself have the Orange Box (Half-Life 2 series, Portal, TF2) and Steam isn't too obtrusive. Although it still isn't completely ideal in me always needing to use Steam to be able to play a game. I also doubt I'll truly buy another game from there (I bought Orange Box and the like before I had properly educated myself on the dangers and pitfalls of DRM).
    You have not read everything I said in this thread, have you?

    Steam allows you to play games offline if you set it to remember you account.

    Also: Steam is just a distribution system that downloads, lists and updates your game. It just also has a function to decrypt files. Source games are just partialy encrypted by Valve.

    Backing up the games just does Ctrl-c + Ctrl+v your game folder to another place. You don't need Steam itself to play decrypted Source games. Illegal downloads have proven this... The 'crack' you then need is just a decrypted exe file, nothing more...

    PS: Steam can also launch any exe file for any game you have...

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    • #17
      Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
      Steam's DRM is completely different from all other DRM's. The way Steam works by controlling distributing games is not restricting. It is rather enabling. If my disc blows up, cratches or by any other means renders it unreadable then I can still download my game and play it.

      I don't need the disc. I don't need the CD key. There are not evil rootkits. It is not restricting me at all.

      In fact it is enabling me to download and play my games everywhere. I can download it so much (if I wanted to) that Valve's bandwith costs make them lose their profit from me buying once and play everywhere.; It can even make them lose money (and they probably already did, lol ).

      They have, and tested it, an exit trategy. Valve's DRM doesn't make me play the game less, or not at all. It lets me play games more. Even when they are bankrupt!

      Now onto the Digital Restriction Management that is everywhere else: I am highly against that! And so unless Primal Carnage goes Steam and doesn't implement its own copy protection whatsoever I will not buy it. I will not even think about buying it for a second!

      It's either no copy protection at all and laying the protection in Valve's hand or a massive no go!

      And that is why we are all against DRM in the first place, because it restricts. Steam's DRM enables by decrypting games that do not have any copy protection themselves. The only reason these games are not playable on their own is because they are encrypted. They do not require Steam at all. And FWIW; you can download them all decrypted and you do not need a crack for them.

      I bought all my Valve games for a reason and only downloaded Half-Life 2 because I didn't know about the backup features and the official unlock forevah patch that Valve tested inhouse.
      I understand the reasoning as to why people aren't overly bothered by the DRM side of steam because of the convenience it brings but I still can't bring myself to like it.

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      • #18
        You still need that initial "phone home" connection though. Being able to back up your games in physical form is a good thing though.

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        • #19
          Just say NO!

          I didn't buy their DRM-sh*t for Windows and wont buy it on Linux!

          (Yes, I would immediately buy DRM-free HL2 or L4D2)

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          • #20
            Out of all the DRM for games out there Valves is one of the least intrusive and works really well.

            I really hope they do come to linux. I would rebuy all my source games if they did

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            • #21
              I truly do hope that Valve comes aboard the Linux platform, because then the door will be open for other gaming companies to do the same. The Linux platform desperately needs a solid gaming scene to attract more "Windoze" users to make the switch.

              One more thing, checkout this web site:

              http://www.onlive.com/

              I encourage all Linux users to check this out and to send in e-mails to encourage support for the Linux platform. It sounds amazing and so far they seem to be only supporting Windows and Mac OS X. From what I've read they use a browser plugin to transfer the latest 3D games to PC's.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Naib View Post
                I really hope they do come to linux. I would rebuy all my source games if they did
                If they handle it the same way they are doing the Mac OS version of steam, your license for existing steam purchases in Windows will transfer to Linux. They've already stated publicly that this would be the case for Mac OS X, so I don't see why they wouldn't do the same for Linux.

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                • #23
                  The license isn't per-platform, nor per-machine. It's really awesome. Steam is the way games, movies, music, and so on should have been sold. If this is how all the other DRM worked, nobody but the fundamentalists would ever have started bitching about it.

                  Contrast to Ubisoft, whose CEO rapes puppies in the park on Tuesdays, kills kittens at animal shelters on Wednesdays, and creates user-hostile DRM schemes on Thursdays. You don't even want to know what he does Friday through Monday, I may get banned just for mentioning any of it!
                  </slander>

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by elanthis View Post
                    The license isn't per-platform, nor per-machine. It's really awesome. Steam is the way games, movies, music, and so on should have been sold. If this is how all the other DRM worked, nobody but the fundamentalists would ever have started bitching about it.
                    DRM doesn't really work for music and movies, because you want to be able to play them on any kind of machine. The fundamentalists (well, I can only speak for myself) care about freedom. If DRM doesn't restrict that freedom, then it's not a problem.

                    Of course, DRM is completely useless as a copy protection mechanism. But it seems to help CEOs sleep at night.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                      You have not read everything I said in this thread, have you?

                      Steam allows you to play games offline if you set it to remember you account.
                      Yes, I read the thread and yes, I already know about Steams offline mode. I've used it. I have it installed now via WINE, and own several of Valves own games which I also have installed after having previously used it before I switched from Windows.

                      My point is regardless of whether you're online or offline - you need steam started before you can launch a game. Offline mode is just Steam without checking the Steam online service. It's a small but still annoying thing - sometimes I'd like to jump straight into TF2 without going through Steam (especially as it takes up over 100mb ram, whether that's normal for Steam or simply inefficiencies in WINE I don't know). They seem to be deliberately using their own games as a way to peddle usage of their store. Nothing wrong with the store itself, but it's troublesome that they use them as battering rams to shove their store down my throat.

                      Better separation between the services and Steam application would be a God send, but I guess you can't have it all. I'm sure there'd be ways for 3rd parties to offer similar features with the same games.

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                      • #26
                        On behalf of Mr Ubisoft I say...

                        Originally posted by elanthis View Post
                        The license isn't per-platform, nor per-machine. It's really awesome. Steam is the way games, movies, music, and so on should have been sold. If this is how all the other DRM worked, nobody but the fundamentalists would ever have started bitching about it.

                        Contrast to Ubisoft, whose CEO rapes puppies in the park on Tuesdays, kills kittens at animal shelters on Wednesdays, and creates user-hostile DRM schemes on Thursdays. You don't even want to know what he does Friday through Monday, I may get banned just for mentioning any of it!
                        </slander>


                        LIBEL!!!!!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by ModplanMan View Post
                          *snip* sometimes I'd like to jump straight into TF2 without going through Steam (especially as it takes up over 100mb ram, whether that's normal for Steam or simply inefficiencies in WINE I don't know). *snip*
                          I second that.

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                          • #28
                            Guestimate fail

                            Guestimate Fail - It's seems (not too surprisingly) Gabe's talk was about generating more buzz around Portal 2 (although it apparently) did involve fake-BSOD-ing the roughly 4000-large audience. I still hold at hope for a Linux release at some point (the latest Phoronix article seems to show hope, except for the bit based on my failed guestimate) in the future - maybe it was a bit too much to hope for expansion to two platforms almost simultaneously; the Mac support has come with Portal 2 maybe the unpredictable Linux release could come with the unpredictable Half-Life 2: Episode 3 release .

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                            • #29
                              Guys there wont be a Linux release of Steam. I expected more from Michael Larabel rather than a "ZOMG IZ IT TRUE ??" type of article. It isn't very sensible Michael to falsely give hope to people

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by bugmenot View Post
                                Guys there wont be a Linux release of Steam. I expected more from Michael Larabel rather than a "ZOMG IZ IT TRUE ??" type of article. It isn't very sensible Michael to falsely give hope to people
                                Well just about a week ago, I would have felt the same way, thinking Valve would never release Steam/Source for anything other than Windows or Xbox 360, but with the sudden announcement of OS X support, it certainly increased the possibility of a Linux port for me, as it shows Valve are actually willing to port to a non-MS platform.

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