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Valve Is Not Commenting On Steam, Source Engine For Linux

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  • Valve Is Not Commenting On Steam, Source Engine For Linux

    Phoronix: Valve Is Not Commenting On Steam, Source Engine For Linux

    Back in 2007 we reported on Valve looking for a senior software engineer to port their Windows-base games to Linux, then in 2008 we said the Source Engine would be coming to Linux based upon our sources (something that we still believe in), later that year we also found a few Linux libraries with the Left 4 Dead game...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODA1Nw

  • #2
    If Valve was to bring Linux support than on day one I would be backing up up all of my data on /home and C:\, whipe the entire drive. Have one home, one swap and two root partitions. On the first root partition it will be an Ubuntu LTS with fglrx and one with the latest and greatest distro of that particular time and then...

    And then...

    I will take my old DOS floppies, genuine Win98SE and and genuine XP disc and burn them ritualy and never use Windows in my entire life again!

    Then the latest Wine releases will decide what Windows game I will finnish next

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    • #3
      i can easily see steam becoming the default game delivering system on all platforms. closed source monopolization. crappy linux build that never gains features. no 64-bit support. crazy-high cpu usage on all platforms, especially linux.

      sorry guys....

      "valve" and "steam" just kind of rhymes with "adobe" and "flash" in my mind.


      disclimer: all i'm saying is i imagine it will be ported, imagine it will monopolize gaming services, and have second or third-rate linux support.

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      • #4
        Over glorified DRM on my Linux? No thanks. Though if it does happen it has the possibility of opening the doors to big commercial games.
        Whatever. Bring it I say. I just won't use it. Hopefully more companies follow. Not everyone uses crazy DRM schemes.

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        • #5
          I say if the DRM stays in my home folder and does not need root, than be my guest. But I am not giving root to any kind of DRM stuff!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Melcar View Post
            Over glorified DRM on my Linux? No thanks. Though if it does happen it has the possibility of opening the doors to big commercial games.
            Whatever. Bring it I say. I just won't use it. Hopefully more companies follow. Not everyone uses crazy DRM schemes.
            Well said I couldn't agree more.

            Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
            If Valve was to bring Linux support than on day one I would be backing up up all of my data on /home and C:\, whipe the entire drive. Have one home, one swap and two root partitions. On the first root partition it will be an Ubuntu LTS with fglrx and one with the latest and greatest distro of that particular time and then...

            And then...

            I will take my old DOS floppies, genuine Win98SE and and genuine XP disc and burn them ritualy and never use Windows in my entire life again!

            Then the latest Wine releases will decide what Windows game I will finnish next
            and in reference to Primal Carnage:-
            Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
            I'll pay whatever it costs as long as:
            A) It's good game.
            B) It's not full of digital rights management.

            If only point A) is pressent I'll just be donwloading it from the intarwebs for zero euro's. (borderline legal here).
            Awesome double standards there dude! Yes I'm a bastard but I'm okay with that.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Melcar View Post
              Over glorified DRM on my Linux? No thanks. Though if it does happen it has the possibility of opening the doors to big commercial games.
              Whatever. Bring it I say. I just won't use it. Hopefully more companies follow. Not everyone uses crazy DRM schemes.
              The DRM scheme is pretty OK when using Valve games + Steam.

              It goes like this:
              You can buy your games in store on a disc. Then you install Steam plus the game as something completely stand-alone.

              You have to the CD key of your game with a Steam account. You have to create an account once on the Steam servers.

              Once you log into Steam for the first time you can set Steam to "Remember account offline" and you'll never have to use the internet ever again. You can play for as long in time as you want without having to obtain a new key through the Steam servers.

              Because your games are tied to your account, you can download them and play them on as many computers as you want and wherever you want. You can do this an unlimited times.

              Steam has a backup feature by which you can backup your downloaded and decrypted game on any physical medium as many times as you want.

              Valve anounced that once the Steam servers go down, a small standalone patch will be released that unlocks your backed up games (otherwise you have to unlock them by signing into Steam, whether that is offline to you remembered account info + offline store keys or thought the servers. And that patch has been made and tested inhouse already.

              So you don't have to worry about DRM in this case. It isn't defective.

              As a matter of fact, wrong as it may sound, it is actually extremely awesome!

              The DRM scheme BTW is completely implemented in the Steam software itself and doesn't copy protect at all or does any other nasty shit!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Melcar View Post
                Over glorified DRM on my Linux? No thanks. Though if it does happen it has the possibility of opening the doors to big commercial games.
                Whatever. Bring it I say. I just won't use it. Hopefully more companies follow. Not everyone uses crazy DRM schemes.
                I really don't find Steam's drm to be intrusive or big problem. I'm no fan of DRM but I still like Steam. I also like that they clearly state if a game has additional DRM that the distributor requires. It makes it easier to avoid buying such games.

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                • #9
                  I regard games as media, not as software. I want to consume it, not depend on it. So, therefore I don't care about it being closed source or full of DRM, as long as it works.

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                  • #10
                    Copy protections are getting worse and worse (someone read about the Ubisoft debacle?), but Steam is running really really good and offers some nice features. I think most Windows gamers will agree that as long as Valve is controlling Steam, you're good to go.

                    Comment

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