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A Battle For Good Open-Source Game Graphics?

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  • #11
    So if the challenge is understanding artists - then go post a survey on DevArt or some other artist oriented site and see what they need...

    Or talk to artists/designers already working on other open source projects. Perhaps it is that open source is well setup for programmer and not artists (tools, environment, workflow, community... what changes do they need to feel more at home, work more effectively, or what is needed to attract new users)

    (Really - it's questions like these that I would hope open source blogs would dig into more)

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    • #12
      Currently Im working in a 3d RPG, which I plan to develop using only open source software. The most difficult part is to get artists, as EvilGuru says. Developers usually are willing to spend time coding just for fun and learning. Artists wants to work for established projects, they want their work to be seen.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Craig73 View Post
        So if the challenge is understanding artists - then go post a survey on DevArt or some other artist oriented site and see what they need...

        Or talk to artists/designers already working on other open source projects. Perhaps it is that open source is well setup for programmer and not artists (tools, environment, workflow, community... what changes do they need to feel more at home, work more effectively, or what is needed to attract new users)

        (Really - it's questions like these that I would hope open source blogs would dig into more)
        Do the artwork for FLOSS games really need to be done with FLOSS tools? I'm sure it would be great if it was, but that's not really a requirement as long as the source files are available in open formats?

        I think the biggest problem is figuring out how to attract artists to spend their time working on art for a game where they really are in control. Instead of trying to mimic the world of proprietary games.

        I mean there's no end to amount of good looking mods made, where the artists and developers really have very little control. Both in the way the mod can be used and distributed and when it comes to the life cycle of the game.

        If we could only get a few of these artists to sink their teeth into FLOSS games (and starting to take licensing seriously) I'm sure we would have lots of great games.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by whizse View Post
          Do the artwork for FLOSS games really need to be done with FLOSS tools? I'm sure it would be great if it was, but that's not really a requirement as long as the source files are available in open formats?
          No need to. But in my case I want to prove that a game can be done without using any propietary software.

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          • #15
            Well partly this is a game design issue and partly a FOSS issue...

            Are we producing games that are sufficiently unique that they will get the visibility to get (relatively) popular to attract artists and modders. I would expect modders want a popular game as well because they want their mod played by as many people as possible.

            And unique games could play into the FOSS book as well... if artists don't want to be recreating assets because you upgraded the engine, and don't want to be cloning graphics from some commercial game... they certainly should be attracted to producing new and interesting games (for their portfolio as least)

            And FOSS should be leveraging it's greater freedoms by separating assets from engine a bit more (even if the assets need to be compiled into the end product) to allow more re-use and re-mixing with less re-creating of assets.

            So it's up to the game producers --- when creating new game play ideas, leverage FOSS by ensuring your tools and engine allow maximum re-use of graphical assets, while being sufficiently unique to interest artists so they don't feel like they are just cloning and existing game.
            Last edited by Craig73; 04-26-2009, 03:16 PM.

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            • #16
              you want nice grphics? look at vegastrike.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by energyman View Post
                you want nice grphics? look at vegastrike.

                I think Beyond the Red Line punts Vegastrike to the curb in that aspect (or pretty much any other oss game there is out there IMHO)

                http://www.youtube.com/BeyondtheRedLine
                Last edited by deanjo; 04-26-2009, 05:52 PM.

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                • #18
                  I don't see any of the cool reflections vegastrike has.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by energyman View Post
                    I don't see any of the cool reflections vegastrike has.
                    You gotta play it for that, some of those vids are pretty old.

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                    • #20
                      the engine is not really open source. You can not sell cds containing the game. It is incompatible to all versions of the gpl.

                      SOFTWARE USE LIMITATIONS AND LIMITED LICENSE

                      General Product License. This copy of FreeSpace 2 (the "Software") is
                      intended solely for your personal non-commercial home entertainment use.
                      You may not decompile, reverse engineer, or disassemble the Software,
                      except as permitted by law. Interplay Entertainment Corp. and its
                      licensors retain all right, title and interest in the Software including
                      all intellectual property rights embodied therein and derivatives thereof.
                      The Software, including, without limitation, all code, data structures,
                      characters, images, sounds, text, screens, game play, derivative works and
                      all other elements of the Software may not be copied, resold, rented,
                      leased, distributed (electronically or otherwise), used on a pay-per-play,
                      coin-op or other for-charge basis, or for any commercial purpose. Any
                      permissions granted herein are provided on a temporary basis and can be
                      withdrawn by Interplay Productions at any time. All rights not expressly
                      granted are reserved.
                      .
                      .
                      ,

                      so beyond the red line does not belong in this thread. Nice try.

                      source code licence:
                      Copyright (C) Volition, Inc. 1999. All rights reserved.

                      All source code herein is the property of Volition, Inc. You may not sell
                      or otherwise commercially exploit the source or things you created based
                      on the source.

                      yeah. Well done.

                      DISQUALIFIED

                      NEXT.

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