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How to get the Linux version of my games?

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  • How to get the Linux version of my games?

    I have some games bought for Windows that have a Linux version listed in http://www.tuxgames.com (like Neverwinter Nights.) Where do I get the Linux binaries for the games? I wish to stress out that I *already* bought the games. Hopefully I'm not required to buy it again for Linux?

  • #2
    For Neverwinter Nights, take a look at this post. Luckily, for this game, you can download the client. What other games do you have? Some games, like Heretic 2 for example, are only good if you buy the Linux version itself. I bought the Windows version of that in a bargain bin years ago & had to re-purchase the Linux version since it was ported by a different company.

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    • #3
      There is also the loki installers
      http://www.liflg.org/?catid=6

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RealNC View Post
        Where do I get the Linux binaries for the games? I wish to stress out that I *already* bought the games. Hopefully I'm not required to buy it again for Linux?
        Ahem... Keeping in mind that I typically don't speak for LGP when I chime in on this forum, and that this is my personal observations in the matter, I'll indicate the following:

        Unless the studio that produced the game provides it themselves, which is NOT the norm, you don't just simply "get" binaries. For titles provided by Bioware (i.e. Neverwinter Nights...), iD (i.e. Quake4, etc...), Epic (UT 2k3/2k4...), 3DRealms/Human Head (i.e. the recent Prey release...), and similar the game binaries are either on the install media or can be downloaded from the studio or at Ryan Gordon's icculus.org website. Some vendors, such as Oddlabs or Hothead actually believe you should have the ability to move from one OS to another so long as only one instance of the game is in play at any one time, even.

        If you're talking about the BULK of things, however, you're talking about someone other than the studio and/or original Windows publisher that is producing the title- or they don't provide a conversion from one OS to another. In this case, you bought a Windows-only title and while you are operating under the impression that you bought the game- you only bought it for running under Windows not in toto. In this case, you will, unfortunately, have to "buy the game again" for Linux. This is because the royalties have to be paid for that Linux version and you haven't done that. You've only paid for the right to play under Windows when you bought the Windows version.

        In reality, this is no different than if you had bought the Windows version of Orange Box and expected a conversion pack to make the game run on the PS3. Or, for any of the titles and expected it to run under MacOS.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the clarification. No Linux games for me then for most of the titles. I have better things to do with my money than pay twice for the same game.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RealNC View Post
            Thanks for the clarification. No Linux games for me then for most of the titles. I have better things to do with my money than pay twice for the same game.
            In case you didnt know, there was a very heated discussion on the subject of buying games twice for linux. You dont want to get Svartalf started on it.

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            • #7
              He's free to buy his twice

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                Thanks for the clarification. No Linux games for me then for most of the titles. I have better things to do with my money than pay twice for the same game.
                I know the feeling there. Unfortunately, that's how the whole lot's framed in- that's the game industry as a whole. I pretty much haven't bought a Windows title, save for evaluation for possible porting, in years now.

                Keep in mind, you have a choice here. You can choose to dual boot (ugh...) or skip those games and just buy ones that support Linux in some way, preferably with a native version. Dual booting keeps perpetuating the very problem you're not happy with, just so you know.

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                • #9
                  I'm dual booting (grub entry is called "Wintendo" ). Fortunately, I've found linux binaries for some of my games (NWN, D3, Q4).

                  The policy of some publishers doesn't make much sense to me. If I want the Linux version, OK, I should pay for the development costs for it. Are they higher then the cost for the Windows binaries? I doubt it. So who cares what it is what I pay for? Money is money, no matter what it's intended for. If I give you 10$ for foo, and then take back those 10$ in order to give you 10$ for bar, you're left with 10$ anyway. :P

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                    I'm dual booting (grub entry is called "Wintendo" ). Fortunately, I've found linux binaries for some of my games (NWN, D3, Q4).

                    The policy of some publishers doesn't make much sense to me. If I want the Linux version, OK, I should pay for the development costs for it. Are they higher then the cost for the Windows binaries? I doubt it. So who cares what it is what I pay for? Money is money, no matter what it's intended for. If I give you 10$ for foo, and then take back those 10$ in order to give you 10$ for bar, you're left with 10$ anyway. :P
                    They develop the game first for windows (second actually, first is for consoles ), then if they have extra money/time/interest they make a linux client, either themselves or have someone else do it. Usually the linux binary making takes a lot of resources and time, for the same game, and most devs dont want to spend more resources and time on the same game. Usually the first developed games are so dependant on windows technologies like directx, d3d, etc, it would take a lot of effort to make it working on linux, so they dont bother.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                      The policy of some publishers doesn't make much sense to me. If I want the Linux version, OK, I should pay for the development costs for it.
                      In the cases where you're having to buy the Linux version, you ARE paying for the development costs for it.

                      Are they higher then the cost for the Windows binaries? I doubt it.
                      Heh... Yes, they actually are, in a per-unit purchased manner. This is because the deck's stacked against you and I on that score right at the moment.

                      So who cares what it is what I pay for? Money is money, no matter what it's intended for. If I give you 10$ for foo, and then take back those 10$ in order to give you 10$ for bar, you're left with 10$ anyway. :P
                      No... You're trying to make things fungible- and not all things in this space are that. You can't do a one-for-one there.

                      It costs X dollars to make a Windows version. It typically costs 10-15% more to make the thing properly cross platform- and if the studio doesn't design it the right way (which is disturbingly often...) it can cost much more than that. Depending on how clean the version is, a porting interest can expend 5-10K in labor, possibly more (more like probably so...), just to migrate the codebase. If it was written with a bit of portability in mind, it's only the 10% that the porting studio has to incur. That's if they're lucky. If not, it can cost as much as 50% of the development cost making the title happen.

                      This doesn't even get into the part where the studio/publisher doing the porting work has to pay royalties up-front to even have the privilege of porting the thing in the first place. There's another $10-250k right there. And that doesn't get into the cut of the proceeds that's due up-front before you get 'em to make a production run for the title.

                      Your $10, multiplied by 2000 units (which is what most runs for Linux currently comprise...more would be insane...) would amount to $20k which comprises the typical porting royalty for a good title and doesn't cover the per-unit royalty.

                      It's not fungible. It's not the studio doing the porting work (You'll note that the binaries you were able to get were all done by the studio that made those games. They expended the 10% or so extra themselves because the effort paid for itself in more robust code.) then someone will have to buy the rights to do the work and that cost has to come from somewhere (which is why you have to re-purchase the Linux versions...).

                      Many publishing interests don't see support and lost good will costs as being something they need to offset and don't care about the portability- it's extra money and extra delay costing them time to market to them. And, unless you're talking 20k units (something the Linux community has YET to have for sales on ANY game to date- mainly because of the attitudes you espouse, unfortunately) these studios won't even think of you being "more money"- seriously so.

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                      • #12
                        Hey, they don't want to spend more money than necessary, that's understandable. But so do I

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                          Hey, they don't want to spend more money than necessary, that's understandable. But so do I
                          It remains to be seen whether what you deem to be that and what actually is coincide. But, it's your choice. Won't really twist your arm, but point out issues with the position. It's understandable- but it's not terribly productive.

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                          • #14
                            Well, I try to hold off on buying a game if I know a linux port is in the works, e.g. Sacred Gold. or X3.
                            How often I have walked past Sacred in bargain bins... So tempting to just buy it there... but I'm still waiting.

                            Also since the only way for me to get hold of any linux-only games, is to buy it online, over post. I can wait the ~3 weeks it takes to get here, but the issue is, I get nailed solidly by the import duties... Sigh, the virtues of living in Africa :P

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                            • #15
                              @Svartalf

                              If that would be only 20k$, then where is a GTA port? I guess the money to do so would be no problem als there is already a PS3 one

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