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Systemd 216 Piles On More Features, Aims For New User-Space VT

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  • Systemd 216 Piles On More Features, Aims For New User-Space VT

    Phoronix: Systemd 216 Piles On More Features, Aims For New User-Space VT

    Lennart Poettering announced the systemd 216 release on Tuesday and among its changes is a more complete systemd-resolved that has nearly complete caching DNS and LLMNR stub resolver, a new systemd terminal library, and a number of new commands...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc2Nzk

  • #2
    Why does an init system need to cache DNS in the first place?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gigaplex View Post
      Why does an init system need to cache DNS in the first place?
      systemd is now an umbrella project for many components that interact which each other. The systemd executable (init system) is just a part of it. Remember udev is also part of systemd.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by gigaplex View Post
        Why does an init system need to cache DNS in the first place?
        Creature feep, of course. Wait til you see the garbage collector and the process scheduler in the next release of systemd.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by gigaplex View Post
          Why does an init system need to cache DNS in the first place?
          To own you... now watch all the staff hired by RH to show up and defend it...

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          • #6
            udev is a can of bugs. On Ubuntu even my CH Pedals don't work anymore, hence I need to test other distros in virtualbox when I find
            time. (evtest)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gigaplex View Post
              Why does an init system need to cache DNS in the first place?
              Systemd 216 isn't an init system. (That's just 1 of the things it includes)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gigaplex View Post
                Why does an init system need to cache DNS in the first place?
                The inti system doesn't. The basic network-setup system that's packaged alongside the init system does.

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                • #9
                  Why yes, what the systemd project *clearly* needed was a full terminal emulator.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by curaga View Post
                    Why yes, what the systemd project *clearly* needed was a full terminal emulator.
                    Of course, even X had a printing server at one point, so why not?!

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                    • #11
                      systemd will end up getting a 3d engine. I called it here first.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by curaga View Post
                        Why yes, what the systemd project *clearly* needed was a full terminal emulator.
                        Well, from what I've read, the in kernel VT code is crufty, fragile and "scary". Moving the VT code out of the kernel and into userland, while using saner and cleaner code has been a wish. Does it matter that userspace VT is handled by systemd?

                        One can dislike systemd, but for better or worse, the project has become the low level, unified Linux userland. Instead of resisting the done deal* of systemd as Linux' system suite, why not make more use of it?

                        *The deal is done people. For all the teeth gnashing and sniping in forums, there have been zero efforts to start a viable, alternative project that can compete with systemd. SysV init is EOL. Distro's are not going to halt progress, just because vocal people on the internet are glorifying an outdated, limited and ill fitting init system. Before a smart ass comments that SysV fits just right, then why are all distro's switching away from SysV? No, alien mind control is not an acceptable answer, nor is coercion (or black magic) from Lennart Poettering.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by r_a_trip View Post
                          Well, from what I've read, the in kernel VT code is crufty, fragile and "scary". Moving the VT code out of the kernel and into userland, while using saner and cleaner code has been a wish. Does it matter that userspace VT is handled by systemd?

                          One can dislike systemd, but for better or worse, the project has become the low level, unified Linux userland. Instead of resisting the done deal* of systemd as Linux' system suite, why not make more use of it?

                          *The deal is done people. For all the teeth gnashing and sniping in forums, there have been zero efforts to start a viable, alternative project that can compete with systemd. SysV init is EOL. Distro's are not going to halt progress, just because vocal people on the internet are glorifying an outdated, limited and ill fitting init system. Before a smart ass comments that SysV fits just right, then why are all distro's switching away from SysV? No, alien mind control is not an acceptable answer, nor is coercion (or black magic) from Lennart Poettering.
                          Oh c'mon. Nobody is seriously opposing systemd here (not to the degree to rage code an alternative anyway). People are just making fun about systemd scope creep.

                          And the day systemd can read mail, it will be declared feature complete.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by log0 View Post
                            Oh c'mon. Nobody is seriously opposing systemd here (not to the degree to rage code an alternative anyway). People are just making fun about systemd scope creep.

                            And the day systemd can read mail, it will be declared feature complete.
                            Well, some comments over the past 3 months have me fooled then. Scope creep can sometimes be a good thing, though. Linux started out as a terminal emulator... A "systemd 2xx added maild" article wouldn't surprise me.

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                            • #15
                              Finally

                              Yeay, great! For people with bad eyes, the command line is really getting hard to read on high-res screens with kms enabled - even when the largest fonts are used. I hope it will be able to use TTF with arbitrary font size (that would be really an improvement for handicapped people).

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