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VA-API Adds Support For VP8 Video Encoding

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  • VA-API Adds Support For VP8 Video Encoding

    Phoronix: VA-API Adds Support For VP8 Video Encoding

    Intel developers have added support for VP8 video encoding to the open-source Video Acceleration API...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc0NDc

  • #2
    Apparently Youtube skipped the VP8 migration once announced, moving to VP9 where appropriate instead, right?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mark45 View Post
      Apparently Youtube skipped the VP8 migration once announced, moving to VP9 where appropriate instead, right?
      Yes. A big portion of YouTube is already using VP9 if you use Chrome.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mark45 View Post
        Apparently Youtube skipped the VP8 migration once announced, moving to VP9 where appropriate instead, right?
        It'd have more weight if they finally killing Flash as now the HTML5 player has in video ads. Add to that a phasing out of h.264 and some dev time contributions to the various DSP designers to implement VP8/9 properly and sign some deals with streaming ccompanies like Netflix and Amazon and they could actually supplant h.265 if they never adopt it themselves.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by d2kx View Post
          Yes. A big portion of YouTube is already using VP9 if you use Chrome.
          Google is claiming 60-65% of all YouTube vids are now encoded with VP9 and it hasn't even rolled out in hardware yet. Next year, it will be 100%.

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          • #6
            I would be more exited, if they support h264 on the q45/q53 IPGs. The Linux Driver can only decode MPEG2, so i use Windows as HTPC.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TheLexMachine View Post
              Google is claiming 60-65% of all YouTube vids are now encoded with VP9 and it hasn't even rolled out in hardware yet. Next year, it will be 100%.
              VP8 never got rolled out in hardware, nobody released a software/firmware update to their h.264 capable DSP hardware that would make it VP8 compatible as well. Why? Google isn't aggressive enough in pushing it and since they aren't it will fail.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Kivada View Post
                VP8 never got rolled out in hardware, nobody released a software/firmware update to their h.264 capable DSP hardware that would make it VP8 compatible as well. Why? Google isn't aggressive enough in pushing it and since they aren't it will fail.
                On the contrary:
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VP8#Implementations

                And with due respect. Nobody update their DSPs (unless standard is not ready and hw ship preview version, then update may land).

                Google have very little leverage here. Mainly because using one (as it could mandate VP8/9 for Android 5 certificats...) would rise costs of hardware.

                Going for YT VP8/9 is better. Nobody pays more. And Google have gradual control (phase out/not ot phase out, for whom, how fast, with which falbacks, etc.)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by przemoli View Post
                  On the contrary:
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VP8#Implementations

                  And with due respect. Nobody update their DSPs (unless standard is not ready and hw ship preview version, then update may land).

                  Google have very little leverage here. Mainly because using one (as it could mandate VP8/9 for Android 5 certificats...) would rise costs of hardware.

                  Going for YT VP8/9 is better. Nobody pays more. And Google have gradual control (phase out/not ot phase out, for whom, how fast, with which falbacks, etc.)
                  IIRC all DSPs are programmable to a point, and all DSPs that are capable of decoding H.264 video can also just as easily decode VP8 as the overhead is about the for both. So yeah, if the manufacturers would have released updates then pretty much every DSP still on the market would be capable of accelerating VP8.

                  Doubt that it'd affect the price of phones any as it wouldn't affect the price per tray of a thousand chips that are sold by the millions.

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                  • #10
                    Intel's spotty Linux drivers

                    Originally posted by Nille View Post
                    I would be more exited, if they support h264 on the q45/q53 IPGs. The Linux Driver can only decode MPEG2, so i use Windows as HTPC.
                    I would be excited to have mpeg2 support for my Haswell pentium. The GPU has the support, but not the Linux driver. And the CPU itself is so lame it is too weak to handle ota TV broadcasts. So when I see an article like this my first thought is what obvious feature is missing.

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