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Systemd 215 Works On Factory Reset, DHCPv4 Server Support

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  • Systemd 215 Works On Factory Reset, DHCPv4 Server Support

    Phoronix: Systemd 215 Works On Factory Reset, DHCPv4 Server Support

    Lennart Poettering announced the release of systemd 215 on Thursday afternoon...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTczNDA

  • #2
    Stateless systems... Factory reset... Rootkits... DRMs... I bet RedHat and Canonical are loving the lyrics...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by atari314 View Post
      Stateless systems... Factory reset... Rootkits... DRMs... I bet RedHat and Canonical are loving the lyrics...
      If you hate them so much, use another distribution (I imagine you do already, but just in case...). Your pointless blather doesn't serve any purpose, or at least no obvious purpose, except to make you look like a troll. If you don't trust the code, have it audited...or audit it yourself, it's not exactly obfuscated.

      I don't know where you're getting DRMs from, and I fail to see what's wrong with stateless systems or factory resets (after all, factory reset only means that you can restore your system to a predictable state, which would be much preferable to doing a full-blown reinstall: takes less time, and doesn't put as much wear on hard drives--an important factor if you're using SSD's).

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      • #4
        Not even my CH Pedals work anymore, hence they should fix first bugs before adding new stuff to systemd/udev.-

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        • #5
          Can someone please comment on what exactly the "Factory Reset" does?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post
            Can someone please comment on what exactly the "Factory Reset" does?
            Taken from the link in the article
            The short story is for allowing factory resets to be done on systemd Linux boxes by flushing out /etc and /var while just preserving the /usr directory while a stateless system is similar and nevers stores the two former directories within persistent storage. The reproducible and verifiable system features are along similar lines but with mandates about storing local configuration data, etc.

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            • #7
              will it be possible to regain a state of package dependant but else software-identical installs like scripts with default settings and stuff? that would be awesome. funny thing is that for ubuntu i have 4 installs (2 of them on the same machine) which all behave differently despite the fact that they have all the same packages (the 2 on the same pc do differ too)
              the only difference is the time of installation. which can be 2-4 releases ago. would be nice to have them behave in the same way. (and fix the broken scripts and settings that now occurr when using alpha stages of releases)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jakubo View Post
                will it be possible to regain a state of package dependant but else software-identical installs like scripts with default settings and stuff? that would be awesome. funny thing is that for ubuntu i have 4 installs (2 of them on the same machine) which all behave differently despite the fact that they have all the same packages (the 2 on the same pc do differ too)
                the only difference is the time of installation. which can be 2-4 releases ago. would be nice to have them behave in the same way. (and fix the broken scripts and settings that now occurr when using alpha stages of releases)
                Yes, that is pretty much what factory-reset does: It removes all the modifications you ever did and gets you to the state your distribution of choice intended.

                Note that this will not work with existing ubuntus (they do not use systemd), nor will it make sure that different versions of the distributions behave in the same way. Even the same distribution on different hardware may behave differently due to different drivers being used. Factory reset will just remove all modifications you ever did and let you start fresh.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Karl Napf View Post
                  Yes, that is pretty much what factory-reset does: It removes all the modifications you ever did and gets you to the state your distribution of choice intended.

                  Note that this will not work with existing ubuntus (they do not use systemd), nor will it make sure that different versions of the distributions behave in the same way. Even the same distribution on different hardware may behave differently due to different drivers being used. Factory reset will just remove all modifications you ever did and let you start fresh.
                  Does it retain MY installation modifications (like fs layout) ? I mean this sounds like a useless feature. Why not just snapshot /etc after install and make user changes into the snapshot so you can revert back ? Restore points before upgrades/changes are more usefull since they are granular ... not all or nothing ....

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Nobu View Post
                    If you don't trust the code, have it audited...or audit it yourself, it's not exactly obfuscated.
                    It's not exactly simple either, given the sheer volume of code and the rate at which it changes. It's practically a full time job to audit the whole lot.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by haplo602 View Post
                      Does it retain MY installation modifications (like fs layout) ? I mean this sounds like a useless feature. Why not just snapshot /etc after install and make user changes into the snapshot so you can revert back ? Restore points before upgrades/changes are more usefull since they are granular ... not all or nothing ....
                      Because not every setup supports snapshots.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by atari314 View Post
                        Stateless systems... Factory reset... Rootkits... DRMs... I bet RedHat and Canonical are loving the lyrics...
                        I love the sound of systemd trolling in the morning

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by atari314 View Post
                          Stateless systems... Factory reset... Rootkits... DRMs... I bet RedHat and Canonical are loving the lyrics...
                          So... two things that actually are part of systemd and aren't bad at all, followed by two completely random things that have nothing to do with systemd. My, that escalated quickly.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by haplo602 View Post
                            Does it retain MY installation modifications (like fs layout) ?
                            You're not allowed to make such modifications. A user has no business doing this. systemd knows best.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by stevenc View Post
                              You're not allowed to make such modifications. A user has no business doing this. systemd knows best.
                              Aahh.. If anything, systemd threads are great ignore list feeders.

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