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VXLAN Support Added To Systemd's Networkd

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  • VXLAN Support Added To Systemd's Networkd

    Phoronix: VXLAN Support Added To Systemd's Networkd

    The latest addition to systemd's networkd networking component is support for Virtual Extensible LANs...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcyMTM

  • #2
    Very soon: Systemd now owns your root, don't worry, you won't be needing that anymore, trust us...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by atari314 View Post
      Very soon: Systemd now owns your root, don't worry, you won't be needing that anymore, trust us...
      Was expecting something like that, nothing more, nothing less.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by atari314 View Post
        Very soon: Systemd now owns your root, don't worry, you won't be needing that anymore, trust us...
        Gotta at least have one clueless troll per systemd post.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by oneofone View Post
          Gotta at least have one clueless troll per systemd post.
          yeap, systemd without trolls is just not the same

          this can be awesome for VM infrastructure(openNebula/etc) guys to replace bridges or tun routings(not an expert in this field but i guess this uses a kernel infrastructure directly which should reduce latency in guest OS)

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          • #6
            There must be a "systemd-troll" module in meatspace

            There must be a "systemd-troll" module in meatspace, judging by some of what I am seeing. ALL Init systems have to be trusted with root access, that is nothing new with systemd. Meanwhile back in ubuntuland, we are still stick with an old version of systemd and don't get these new features. I suppose I could build it locally, but the farther I fork my systems from Ubuntu/Mint, the harder they will be to maintain in an alpha-following mode.

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            • #7
              One good point for systemd:

              Vxlan support is available since kernel 3.7 (decembre 2012), and debian sid don't support it yet to defined them in /etc/network/interfaces.
              (miising /etc/network.d/.... scripts)

              I'll be very happy if systemd make some kind of standardization for network definitions between the distros, because currently it's really a mess, just look at debian vs redhat vs for example,
              configuration files are totaly differents.


              (I'm contributor on the proxmox kvm solution, so we are using a lot of bridge/openvswitchs/interfaces/bonding/.... and sometime I can really be a pain with current debian /etc/network.d/ script files)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by spirit View Post
                One good point for systemd:

                Vxlan support is available since kernel 3.7 (decembre 2012), and debian sid don't support it yet to defined them in /etc/network/interfaces.
                (miising /etc/network.d/.... scripts)

                I'll be very happy if systemd make some kind of standardization for network definitions between the distros, because currently it's really a mess, just look at debian vs redhat vs for example,
                configuration files are totaly differents.


                (I'm contributor on the proxmox kvm solution, so we are using a lot of bridge/openvswitchs/interfaces/bonding/.... and sometime I can really be a pain with current debian /etc/network.d/ script files)
                Do you primarily use RedHat?

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                • #9
                  It was mentioned above that systemd wasn't being upgraded in Ubuntu/Mint with updating in general.

                  So I ask, does this happen across all distro's? Does systemd generally stay at the released version in distros, or upgraded only on point releases for sanity's/supports sake maybe? I cant even remember if the kernel is upgraded in the point releases of Ubuntu. And would it be unreasonable to update my systemd alone from an external repo/PPA should I desire the latest release for my main rigs? (If I have to have it in Qiana, I might as well damn well get the most from it). Would this cause any issues with my distro's? Or should I just leave well alone until said point releases (Mint is now on a two year before next release dev platform, so I plan on going repo/ppa nuts on one of my machines) are released?

                  Not sure just how tied in with kernel's and drivers etc systemd is.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stiiixy View Post
                    It was mentioned above that systemd wasn't being upgraded in Ubuntu/Mint with updating in general.

                    So I ask, does this happen across all distro's? Does systemd generally stay at the released version in distros, or upgraded only on point releases for sanity's/supports sake maybe? I cant even remember if the kernel is upgraded in the point releases of Ubuntu. And would it be unreasonable to update my systemd alone from an external repo/PPA should I desire the latest release for my main rigs? (If I have to have it in Qiana, I might as well damn well get the most from it). Would this cause any issues with my distro's? Or should I just leave well alone until said point releases (Mint is now on a two year before next release dev platform, so I plan on going repo/ppa nuts on one of my machines) are released?

                    Not sure just how tied in with kernel's and drivers etc systemd is.
                    In Arch we currently have 213 in [core] and 214 in [testing]. And yes, kernel recieves every point release with major versions staying in [testing] for week or two.
                    If you want up-to-date releases you should drop legacy cruft of Debian/Ubuntu/Mint and go with Gentoo/Arch.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by atari314 View Post
                      Very soon: Systemd now owns your root, don't worry, you won't be needing that anymore, trust us...
                      You see the problem with systemd is that there's just not enough of it. They really need to add xserverd, desktopd and kerneld.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by stiiixy View Post
                        It was mentioned above that systemd wasn't being upgraded in Ubuntu/Mint with updating in general.

                        So I ask, does this happen across all distro's? Does systemd generally stay at the released version in distros, or upgraded only on point releases for sanity's/supports sake maybe?
                        Excepting "rolling release" distros like Arch, most distros will probably stay with the same systemd version during the lifespan of the distro release, though they may backport certain fixes.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by spirit View Post
                          Vxlan support is available since kernel 3.7 (decembre 2012), and debian sid don't support it yet to defined them in /etc/network/interfaces.
                          (miising /etc/network.d/.... scripts)
                          Actually, you are saying that it's quite supported in debian with the up and pre-up stanza's.
                          Of all systems I have worked with, the debian way feels the most natural: it works as it should, if it doesn't you can hook your fixes right there.
                          To be clear: *NONE* of the existing network configurators work. But of all the bad things out there, debian ifupdown is the least bad.
                          Consider IPv6 configuration for example.
                          How many network configurator software these days allow you to select which interfaces should have it, and how should it be configured?
                          Debian ifupdown doesn't support it, but you can sysctl -w the right settings in the pre-up.
                          So, how are we going to hook something simple like this into systemd?
                          (If I am right, openwrt is (almost) on the verge of getting it right).
                          I hope one day we will get a systemd like daemon, that just has lua hooks everywhere.
                          If we can run lua in the kernel as packet filter, why not use it in a init daemon to enable flexibility or patch imperfections.

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