Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Systemd 214 Comes "Stuffed With Great New Features"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Systemd 214 Comes "Stuffed With Great New Features"

    Phoronix: Systemd 214 Comes "Stuffed With Great New Features"

    Lennart Poettering announced, "Here it is, version 214. Stuffed with great new features, improvements in all areas, in particular when it comes to security, networking and socket units."..

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcxNzc

  • #2
    "Great New Features", so cancer has a new name... ok...

    Comment


    • #3
      Perfect trollbait title.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by atari314 View Post
        "Great New Features", so cancer has a new name... ok...
        How much are Microsoft paying you to troll systemd?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Truth View Post
          How much are Microsoft paying you to troll systemd?
          Doubt MS is paying anyone to bash systemd. Most of them are "i think i am cool using a featureless WM" neckbeards that the best they can do is write shitty command line programs nobody uses.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by xeekei View Post
            Perfect trollbait title.
            The scarequotes take the cake.

            Comment


            • #7
              Systemd is a boot manager, it's not Satan. Some of the "bugs" aren't IN systemd

              The degree of FUD that comes up everytime Systemd is mentioned makes me sick. This crap has got to be a huge morale-buster, enough of this kind of back and forth attacks could slow the pace of FOSS software development or even drive people away, saying "I don't think I want to get into THAT catfight." It will be all of open source software, not just systemd, getting tarred with that brush if the vicious flame wars and attacks continue. If systemd did not exist and everyone was migrating to upstart, the same FUD would fly, this time targetting Canonical instead of Red Hat.

              It's just a boot manager-it starts up other programs at boot time. I've been using it both on main root and in the initramfs with little trouble since the beginning of May, since I needed to port a custom boot service I use over to it. The only issue I am having is with Plymouth: I have to kill it and let it respawn at the root switch or it will freeze and lock the system when X starts. Debian and Ubuntu have yet to package Plymouth 0.9, which contains systemd integration fixes and hopefully will permit plymouth to keep the splash showing until lightdm.service calls plymouth-quit.service to shut it down.

              I went through the source of the cryptsetup module myself, deeming it the most likely target of a malicious keylogger or back door. As expected, I found no evidence of anything malicious. Since I wrote my own boot-time disk unlocker to handle unlocking an arbitrary number of disks with one passphrase, I figured I had a better idea than many what to look for. After all, if I wanted to give an "evil maided" version of my boot time disk unlocker to an enemy who had stolen one of my systems, I could do it in two lines of code, three at the most.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by xeekei View Post
                Perfect trollbait title.
                The amount of ignorant dbags that live in the 90s on these forums is too damn high.

                Comment


                • #9
                  systemd DOES have many great features.

                  its the political agenda and some of the quirks in the implementation that are there to push the agenda which pisses off people.

                  You may get off your high horses now.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you want to use systemd features in a package

                    Originally posted by balouba View Post
                    systemd DOES have many great features.

                    its the political agenda and some of the quirks in the implementation that are there to push the agenda which pisses off people.

                    You may get off your high horses now.
                    That package will depend on systemd. Obviously my boot time disk unlocker depends on systemd, as it was written for systemd. My guess is the GNOME team wanted to make use of systemd features, thus they depend on systemd when using Wayland. You can bypass an unwanted package manager dependency by creating an empty package that "provides" the package in question in Debian based distros, I suspect other package management systems have similar options. Ubuntu was able to write a systemd-shim to use systemd depending packages with Upstart until they decided to switch. It was that decision that got my off my ass, not to revert the yet to be implemented switch, but instead to port my own code over.

                    As for "agendas," if all the Linux-based distros used a single boot manager and again used a single display system (as they did with x11), it makes it a lot easier to write tbings like other desktop environments, things with real impacts on user experience, and to make them portable across more distros.

                    Systemd is modular, you can replace or ignore a module that does not suit your needs. If the cryptsetup module fitted my use case, I would use it. Since it does not, I wrote my own and systemd gave me no trouble. Instead, getting it to launch directly from systemd instead of as a Dracut module cut a second off boot time and made Plymouth's passphrase screen look much better by coming up before my "armed penguins" progress indicator could start.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X