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FFmpeg & Libav Add H.265 Encoder Via x265

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  • FFmpeg & Libav Add H.265 Encoder Via x265

    Phoronix: FFmpeg & Libav Add H.265 Encoder Via x265

    FFmpeg and its forked Libav have each added an H.265 / HEVC encoder today to their respective code-bases...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTYwMTg

  • #2
    typo

    We have also seen open-source HEVC / H.265 support come via libde265 as a decoder for this video format that doubles the data compression ration of H.265 while at the same video quality level.
    I think the h.265 in bold should be h.264

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    • #3
      While the wind of change is upon Debian, they should also switch back to ffmpeg. Switching to libav was a mistake and it's time to correct that.

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      • #4
        I try to compile x265 in order to try it with ffmpeg but I cannot find the proper option to make it install in /usr/lib64 instead of /usr/lib.
        Did anyone manage to do that?

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        • #5
          hmm is there anywhere test on linux with h.265 material? I think there aren't any hardware decoder, which can decode h.265/vp9 material(well qualcomm snapdragon 805 might have hw decoder) on gpu side(purevideoHD or uvd). So decoding is done with cpu. It would be nice to see which processors are really up to the task on linux.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Temar View Post
            While the wind of change is upon Debian, they should also switch back to ffmpeg. Switching to libav was a mistake and it's time to correct that.
            Is not the maintainer from that pakage a member from the libva fork? i doubt that he want to use ffmpeg. But if you want that debian know you wish, post it in the bug system https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugr...cgi?bug=729203

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            • #7
              Would be interesting to see how image quality is performing right now.

              Is a simple h265 encoder able to surpass the finely-tuned x264? There's a lot more in a video format than just the spec

              But I guess h265 is ready when the first anime encodes show up. First time I've heard of 10-bit h264, h264 or even DivX was on anime encodes. Those guys are tech junkies, and don't give a crap about your old computer

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              • #8
                Encode options?

                If anyone can figure out the options to pass to ffmpeg/x265 that control quality settings for VBR, please let me know. I tried compressing some video with -crf 16, and it totally spat out video at something like 80kbps. Not even x265 can make that watchable. I also tried adding -qmin 16, but it simply ignored me.

                Setting -b:v 512k or 1024k worked, but looked awful in comparison to x264 at the same bitrate. With the poor quality, documentation, and slow encode times (~4 FPS on my box), it will probably be a while before this becomes usable, even if it is finally available.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Temar View Post
                  While the wind of change is upon Debian, they should also switch back to ffmpeg. Switching to libav was a mistake and it's time to correct that.
                  For us sane folks: http://deb-multimedia.org/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DanL View Post
                    For us sane folks: http://deb-multimedia.org/
                    True, but it's been a pain in the rear with updates, so I just removed these packages. I second the notion of just using ffmpeg proper. Losing functionality and increasing instability in favor of policy zealots was both unprofessional and myopic.

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                    • #11
                      Many people think that FOSS automatically means benevolent, transparent and non-pervasive. The current ffmpeg vs. libav situation is a great illustration of why it's not so. libav is FOSS but it's malicious and destructive (is advertised as a drop-in replacement for ffmpeg while not actually being one), pervasive (disguises itself as ffmpeg at least on Debian and Debian-based distros) and opaque (tries to convince end users that ffmpeg is deprecated at least on Debian and Debian-based distros).

                      Likewise, believing that systemd must be harmless just because it's FOSS (and this seems to be a really widespread opinion these days) is just another such fallacy, wishful thinking at its worst. Also note that GPL can do nothing to make things better in such cases. GPL can protect software from bad people but it cannot protect people from bad software, overambitious developers or unscrupulous distro maintainers.
                      Last edited by prodigy_; 02-13-2014, 05:55 AM.

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                      • #12
                        The horrible situation is also a result of problems with software distribution.
                        Each, almost each, distro has it's own package system with it's own walled-garden app store.
                        Changing has a lot of barriers, software development to multiple distro's is time-consuming.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by prodigy_ View Post
                          Many people think that FOSS automatically means benevolent, transparent and non-pervasive. The current ffmpeg vs. libav situation is a great illustration of why it's not so. libav is FOSS but it's malicious and destructive (is advertised as a drop-in replacement for ffmpeg while not actually being one), pervasive (disguises itself as ffmpeg at least on Debian and Debian-based distros) and opaque (tries to convince end users that ffmpeg is deprecated at least on Debian and Debian-based distros).

                          Likewise, believing that systemd must be harmless just because it's FOSS (and this seems to be a really widespread opinion these days) is just another such fallacy, wishful thinking at its worst. Also note that GPL can do nothing to make things better in such cases. GPL can protect software from bad people but it cannot protect people from bad software, overambitious developers or unscrupulous distro maintainers.
                          You were going strong until you shat on the first paragraph with the political stance of hating systemd. I've not seen a technical reason of superiority for Upstart and I sure as hell haven't seen anyone with a brain recognize init systems fully compatible with FreeBSD/OS X is actually intelligent, but I do see all sorts of Wine raves for the past year concerning Windows games as if Microsoft has ever given a flying frack about Linux or any aspect of the Open Source Community it can't legal exploit.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
                            I've not seen a technical reason of superiority for Upstart
                            Upstart? God forbid! The only sane altenative to classic init today is OpenRC.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nakedhitman View Post
                              If anyone can figure out the options to pass to ffmpeg/x265 that control quality settings for VBR, please let me know. I tried compressing some video with -crf 16, and it totally spat out video at something like 80kbps. Not even x265 can make that watchable. I also tried adding -qmin 16, but it simply ignored me.
                              -c:v libx265 -x265-params crf=23 -preset veryslow
                              works but bitrate is higher than with x264 crf 18 and quality is worse

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