Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How To Boot A UEFI Self-Signed Linux Kernel

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How To Boot A UEFI Self-Signed Linux Kernel

    Phoronix: How To Boot A UEFI Self-Signed Linux Kernel

    Greg Kroah-Hartman has noted that the Linux Foundation has joined the UEFI.org group. With his new UEFI dealings, he's decided to better document the steps needed to build and boot a self-signed Linux kernel that will work on UEFI SecureBoot enabled systems...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ1MTg

  • #2
    Madness?

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: How To Boot A UEFI Self-Signed Linux Kernel

    Greg Kroah-Hartman has noted that the Linux Foundation has joined the UEFI.org group. With his new UEFI dealings, he's decided to better document the steps needed to build and boot a self-signed Linux kernel that will work on UEFI SecureBoot enabled systems...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ1MTg
    It is sickening to see people seem to have accepted the fact their UEFI-SB-bootloaders are controlling them.
    It should be the other way round: We should control our computing!

    Hell, even Apple's EFI is a more open platform than this.
    My Mac mini from late 2012 boots my Kernel in EFI-stub-mode just fine and is blazing fast.
    No fiddling or self-signed certificates needed.

    Comment


    • #3
      C r a z y

      This is crazy, all those steps just to boot the system ? And this is thanks to Microsoft ? I hope they burn in hell.

      As the previous poster mentioned, this is absolutely crazy... and the linux gurus just accept the situation? What if they enforce Windows 8 installation in the future ? Come on!

      Comment


      • #4
        ISANITY

        Agreed ^^^^^

        Comment


        • #5
          Let's see. What the kernel devs are doing doesn't change the fact that providers should not lock you into using secure boot. As is, and as an option, secure boot is a good technology. The problem was that Windows was the only one with rights to create signatures, and that some providers locked you into using secure boot, when it should be optional. I'm using an HP envy m6, and this came with optional secure boot, and I'd rather use it if I'm able to keep using Linux and to keep my dual boot (since where I bought it they didn't give me the option to take it without OS, I already paid Windows and so I'd use it when I need to run Windows apps). I wouldn't now, because I don't have the time to build my own kernel right now (if I'm going to do so, I will put a customized, minimal configuration, and it will take time). Of course, right now I disabled it.

          Also, all of this could be automated by distributions, so complains about "too many steps" are valid only right now, that distros doesn't do this work for you (I tried Ubuntu signed kernels, but they didn't work on my machine).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by wargames View Post
            This is crazy, all those steps just to boot the system ?
            Well, no... all those steps to boot the system *without a bootloader*. If you're using a normal setup, you don't need to do all that, because you're using a signed bootloader.

            It's still a messy situation, but it's not like this is something that every Linux user has to do if they want to use UEFI hardware...

            Comment


            • #7
              We should never surrender.

              I have an asus K75D laptop, with uefi/secure boot, but I just couldn't stand Windows H8te <-
              So, I just blew it away, and enabled bios compatibilty boot, installed a 2nd drive, for all my media, and now, I am quite happy with having whatever Linux distro (of MY choise), that I want on it.
              Sure, at first, I tried spending a stupid amount of time, getting Linux to work in uefi/SB,..., but, in the end, it angered me even more that I had to do ALL that crap, just to enjoy something that I $PAID Asus good money for. !

              Yep, all this is ALL solely because of Microsoft trying to LOCK-OUT "any" other OS,
              This is exactly what people do NOT want, and I'm glad Asus gave Microsoft RT, ( or whatever that mess is called ), the boot -"literally" !
              even if it's just for now.
              http://www.digitaltrends.com/computi...ell-microsoft/

              ... Hopefully, in the end, Asus, ... and ALL the other hardware makers, (except those idiots@Dell), will start building our systems of choice to be more accesible to ANY OS, again. ?
              ya right, hold my breath .

              Comment

              Working...
              X