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Linux x32 Support Brewing For Clang/Compiler-RT

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  • #11
    Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post
    You've got me there. If you don't have enough bandwidth to download updates you'd probably be better on a LTS distribution, make sure you only get security fixes to minimize updates, and order a DVD when updating to a new release... (half serious)
    LTS Distribution also get huge patch packages and many of there Packages are outdated. e.g. if you use the FOSS Driver you rely on upstream packages.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Nille View Post
      LTS Distribution also get huge patch packages and many of there Packages are outdated. e.g. if you use the FOSS Driver you rely on upstream packages.
      There are always trade-offs. If Internet connection capacity is the limiting factor, that does determine the options available for a user when choosing a distribution.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post
        There are always trade-offs. If Internet connection capacity is the limiting factor, that does determine the options available for a user when choosing a distribution.
        i want only to point that there is no big difference in patch frequency's and sizes.

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        • #14
          That shouldn't be the case with LTS, especially with security only updates.

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          • #15
            This has kind of wondered off topic though, my point is, not every distribution is for everybody, likewise x32 isn't for everybody. But if you want a faster, and potentially leaner distribution it will be a good option.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post
              That shouldn't be the case with LTS, especially with security only updates.
              A normal Release also get only security patches. The Only difference is that you can postpone the Upgrade.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Nille View Post
                A normal Release also get only security patches. The Only difference is that you can postpone the Upgrade.
                A normal release will provide security updates for their current version of the package, which means it will be upgraded if you have an old version along with all the updated dependencies. LTS aims to keep dependency versions stable so you'll only be downloading the patched package and only rarely will dependencies require updating. That's why LTS distributions typically have old (non-bleeding-edge/stable) versions.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post
                  A normal release will provide security updates for their current version of the package, which means it will be upgraded if you have an old version along with all the updated dependencies. LTS aims to keep dependency versions stable so you'll only be downloading the patched package and only rarely will dependencies require updating. That's why LTS distributions typically have old (non-bleeding-edge/stable) versions.
                  In the Example Ubuntu is not an bleeding egde Distribution. so in a normal release the packages don't get an upgrade only security fixes. And LTS doesn't mean that they are only stable packages include or non bleeding edge it means only that this version has longer support cycles. look at the past LTS releases. there are tons of beta, alpha and even git snapshots included.

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                  • #19
                    Maybe you missed my link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long-term_support

                    Ubuntu policy for managing their LTS releases is their business, if they make it hard for themselves by including unstable* versions of software, that's up to them. Read the definition at Wikipedia link to see how I'm using the term.

                    * Ubuntu can always stabilise packages themselves - some upstreams don't really do "stable" anyway...

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                    • #20
                      Ubuntu has an other interpretation from LTS. Like i say. look at the past lts releases and the heavy changes that they has noting todo with Stable. In Ubuntus interpretation of LTS its only a longer Support cycle.

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