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Daala: A Next-Generation Video Codec From Xiph

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  • Daala: A Next-Generation Video Codec From Xiph

    Phoronix: Daala: A Next-Generation Video Codec From Xiph

    Xiph.Org is now working on Daala, a new general-purpose video codec designed to be next-generation beyond VP9 and HEVC. The project is still considered "pre-pre-alpha", but it gives hope to a new generation of open-source video support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM5MzA

  • #2
    The only thing I'm worried about is how badly mpeg-la will try to patent troll the crap out of Mozilla and Xiph if they actually make a better product that is FOSS.

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    • #3
      the only thing i'm worried about is, what kind of acceptance this can hope for, given that:
      -it's not an industry-wide standard (as in, embraced by sw AND appliance vendors)
      -it's based on different techniques, thus doesnt rely on the same processing "blocks" (eg DCT) that chips with video decoding capabilities can usually handle
      -desktop computing is on the decline, more and more replaced by portable, small device, computing - but hw based video decoding (offloading) matters on those devices...

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      • #4
        @silix
        About hardware acceleration mattering on mobile.
        Most high-end and mid range mobile GPU's are starting to support OpenCL,
        which could provide for a good basis for video decoding.
        Allowing things like Daala be done good enough (fast enough video decoding for fluent playback) without having to add extra hardware.
        Last edited by plonoma; 06-21-2013, 03:26 PM. Reason: clarification

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        • #5
          Originally posted by plonoma View Post
          @silix
          About hardware acceleration mattering on mobile.
          Most high-end and mid range mobile GPU's are starting to support OpenCL,
          which could provide for a good basis for video decoding.
          Allowing things like Daala be done good enough (fast enough video decoding for fluent playback) without having to add extra hardware.
          Still need asic for entropy coding.

          Edit: These wouldn't be problems if device makers started including fpgas as a matter of fact. It'd be nice if they were on SoC, but that won't happen. You shouldn't need a a huge number of gates for the above process.
          Last edited by liam; 06-21-2013, 03:51 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by liam View Post
            These wouldn't be problems if device makers started including fpgas as a matter of fact.
            FPGAs? LOL, it will never happen.
            ## VGA ##
            AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
            Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by liam View Post
              Edit: These wouldn't be problems if device makers started including fpgas as a matter of fact.
              > Mass market consumer devices
              > FPGAs

              You wot m8

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              • #8
                Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
                FPGAs? LOL, it will never happen.
                There are very few things I would say could never happen. This isn't one of those things, but I get your point. FPGAs are expensive, large, and relatively power hungry compared to asics, but are ideal for situations like this where you have a quasi-embedded system but with that will experience significent software upgrades over the course of its useful life, and has tight power constraints.

                Originally posted by Ancurio View Post
                > Mass market consumer devices
                > FPGAs

                You wot m8
                ?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by liam View Post
                  ?
                  "Hey, let's create a mobile device with FPGAs! It will be many times slower than similarly priced devices with dedicated HW,
                  but on the upside, 5 years later we can patch our hardware to do new tasks,
                  so consumers don't even have to buy a new product from us to keep up!"

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                  • #10
                    Doesn't hurt to have an option. I don't think Xiph has ever expected devices to quickly adopt any of their new technology. It'll come around eventually, so long as it's truly an improvement. There's more open software in consumers' homes today than ever before, so there's a chance it will make in-roads someday. Aside from that, it could be interesting to experiment with for the potential applications, so I'd say it's worth the effort.

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