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Go 1.1 Language Brings Performance Improvements

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  • Go 1.1 Language Brings Performance Improvements

    Phoronix: Go 1.1 Language Brings Performance Improvements

    After more than one year since the release of the Go 1.0 programming language by Google, Go 1.1 has been unveiled as the first major update to the programming language...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM3MTE

  • #2
    Has anybody actually built anything with this language yet?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cbamber85 View Post
      Has anybody actually built anything with this language yet?
      Hello World!

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      • #4
        Nah it's just a "me too" thing, every big corporation needs to have their very own programming language... Apple has Objective-C, microsoft has C#, Oracle has Java... even Mozilla has their Rust language, so obviously Google just felt that it needs to have all the same toys the other kids have...

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        • #5
          go away go go!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cbamber85 View Post
            Has anybody actually built anything with this language yet?
            Yes, people build things with Go: http://godoc.org/-/index
            And companies: http://code.google.com/p/go-wiki/wiki/GoUsers

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dee. View Post
              Nah it's just a "me too" thing, every big corporation needs to have their very own programming language... Apple has Objective-C, microsoft has C#, Oracle has Java... even Mozilla has their Rust language, so obviously Google just felt that it needs to have all the same toys the other kids have...
              Read about why Go was created and its goals: http://talks.golang.org/2012/splash.article

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 0xCAFE View Post
                Read about why Go was created and its goals: http://talks.golang.org/2012/splash.article
                Too boring. Every language has one of those... "we want to be a functional but also readable but also fast and easy to maintain and flexible blah blah blah"... Any good corporate machine can come up with a bunch of marketing speak to justify hauling dirt from a hole to another hole and back if so needed. What's actually relevant is: is it actually being used in any meaningful capacity? Does it actually fill a real-world need?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 0xCAFE View Post
                  Read about why Go was created and its goals: http://talks.golang.org/2012/splash.article
                  I should qualify that I wasn't being snarky... I read a Dr Dobbs article about a year ago, and they rather liked it, but since then it's dropped off my radar.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dee. View Post
                    Too boring. Every language has one of those... "we want to be a functional but also readable but also fast and easy to maintain and flexible blah blah blah"... Any good corporate machine can come up with a bunch of marketing speak to justify hauling dirt from a hole to another hole and back if so needed. What's actually relevant is: is it actually being used in any meaningful capacity? Does it actually fill a real-world need?
                    I've been using Go to build a web-based, PC management system. Go brings absolutely nothing new to the table. Every feature it offers has been done before. What, I think, makes Go stand out is all of it's features were carefully integrated in the language and doesn't feel slapped on (or maybe I've been programming for way too long in C++).

                    One of things I really appreciate is the way Go handles errors. There are multiple return types and a dedicated error type. This makes error checking as simple as:

                    Code:
                    x, err := getValue()
                    if err != nil {
                        //handle the error here
                    }
                    Maybe it's because I've seen horrors beyond your imagining when it comes to exception handling in Java, but deciding not to use exeption-based programming in favor of a simple error-based system makes Go programs much simpler to write and read, as well as being flexible rather than being stuck in the try/catch/finally clause.

                    The standard library has pretty much everything you need: standard utilities like string conversion and string libraries, networking, web sockets, reflection, crypto, etc.

                    Another cool thing is its empty interface (void pointer). Within itself, it's not too useful, but when combined with reflection, you have Go's answer for its lack of polymorphism. Now, you can throw any data type into a function and still know what it is. A third party library for MongoDB (mgo) makes extensive use of this, and it makes inserting and getting data extremely easy.

                    Now, for all of Go's advantages, it brings its own slew of disadvantages. Go's duck typing system, for example, makes it very easy to accidently allocate a new variable with the same name when reworking some code, making it very hard to debug.

                    But that's enough for now. I feel like Go's a very useful language, at least for building servers. But you'll have to try it and decide for yourself.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Vax456 View Post

                      But that's enough for now. I feel like Go's a very useful language, at least for building servers. But you'll have to try it and decide for yourself.
                      Ok, maybe I will.

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                      • #12
                        Itís a very interesting language to use instead of C or C++ due to many improvements (speed of compilation, no need to write headers, garbage collection, relative simplicity of the language, more readable and maintainable code, ease of writing concurrent programs), but I havenít yet built anything with it. Google say they have, of course, as well as several other businesses.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by cbamber85 View Post
                          Has anybody actually built anything with this language yet?
                          Yes..., for example:
                          https://github.com/globocom/tsuru PaaS software (cloud for web applications)

                          and from Mozilla:
                          http://www.h-online.com/open/news/it...e-1854106.html

                          The developers behind Heka also thought about using Rust (a language developed by Mozilla), but then decided to go with Go, because Rust will have too much changes in the future.

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