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  • DRM Moves Ahead With HTML5 Specification

    Phoronix: DRM Moves Ahead With HTML5 Specification

    The W3C has decided to go ahead and publish the first public draft of the Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), a form of Digital Rights Management for HTML5...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM3MDE

  • #2
    There's not going to be an Internet without DRM, so while the Free Software Foundation and others may be against EME, it's at least a standardization on HTML5 rather than all the different DRM protection schemes in Flash, Silverlight, browser plug-ins, etc.
    Brutal truth indeed.

    If we are going to deal with DRM in our lives, the least they can do is to standardize its implementation.

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    • #3
      Well, if that can make Netflix available on Linux, I suppose it's a good thing... Some choice is better than none overall.

      I'm still extremely annoyed at the whole video DRM situation here. It's impossible to watch any films on Linux. DVDs use paranoid DRM that prevents OSS players from playing them (apparently OSS is just too transparent to get the certification needed to display the content). Blu-ray discs use that same DRM, just ten times more paranoid and ingrained within the discs themselves. So no disc media is available for Linux. That leaves streaming video... Oh wait, Netflix doesn't support Linux. Why? DRM! That again can't run on Linux due to it being OSS! And overall there are very few and only very local streaming video providers for some odd reason.

      Once again, I want to give a shout-out to the developer of Lib-ray, for an interesting project that aims to provide Blu-ray capability, but without DRM. I hope the project is a success, so even if it doesn't reach much popularity, it will at least provide an option. Hopefully someone out there will realise that DRM like that is stupid and hurts their sales, instead of helping them.

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      • #4
        People will continue to pirate content DRM or not.

        It will crack eventually.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
          Well, if that can make Netflix available on Linux, I suppose it's a good thing... Some choice is better than none overall.

          I'm still extremely annoyed at the whole video DRM situation here. It's impossible to watch any films on Linux. DVDs use paranoid DRM that prevents OSS players from playing them (apparently OSS is just too transparent to get the certification needed to display the content). Blu-ray discs use that same DRM, just ten times more paranoid and ingrained within the discs themselves. So no disc media is available for Linux. That leaves streaming video... Oh wait, Netflix doesn't support Linux. Why? DRM! That again can't run on Linux due to it being OSS! And overall there are very few and only very local streaming video providers for some odd reason.
          That's why specialized appliances like intelligent Blu-ray players with access to online media content exist.

          The whole point is to make it easy on the user by sinking some money (about $200) into a black box that plays virtually everything. I bought, at huge cost, one of those smart TVs that offer access to online streaming content and a blu-ray player for my parents and both of them essentially serve all their media needs, so it's a fair investment.
          Last edited by Sonadow; 05-11-2013, 01:43 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
            People will continue to pirate content DRM or not.

            It will crack eventually.
            Can you think of a better way to stop people from pirating content?

            Even humble indie bundle games get pirated.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
              Brutal truth indeed.

              If we are going to deal with DRM in our lives, the least they can do is to standardize its implementation.
              That way we can at least standardize a way to break DRM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                Can you think of a better way to stop people from pirating content?

                Even humble indie bundle games get pirated.
                watermarks are a alternative to DRM. The ORBX.js codec - Mozilla and Otoy announced recently - will make use of it.

                Look ma, no plugins! Streaming web video with just JavaScript
                Last edited by Fenrin; 05-11-2013, 02:24 PM.

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                • #9
                  I think this is bad news.

                  EME does not bring standardized DRM to HTML5. It only standardizes JavaScript API to access CDM (Content Decryption Module), which is part of DRM-system. W3C is NOT standardizing CDM technology. So unless someone provides CDM for Linux that Hollywood trusts, you wont be able to watch Netflix with Linux (without using Wine). If they haven't trusted Linux earlier, why would they trust it now? For example, Voddler has no rights to show films on Linux platforms See this:

                  http://www.voddler.com/en/help/topic...9942297113506/

                  And since CDMs aren't standardized, they are more like plugins. What makes them different from plugins? Why not use Flash instead?

                  I think they have the right to use DRM if they want but W3C shouldn't be standardizing APIs that encourage creating and using of proprietary, nonstandard plugins.

                  And please stop thinking that web needs content industry. It's the other way around (if you ask me). They would bring content to web with, or without DRM. If they wouldn't they'd lose money. Please read myth 3. from here for example:
                  http://freeculture.org/blog/2013/04/...all-web-users/

                  I hope this draft doesn't go further.

                  W3C blog post:
                  http://www.w3.org/QA/2013/05/perspec...pted_medi.html

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                    Can you think of a better way to stop people from pirating content?

                    Even humble indie bundle games get pirated.
                    No. And i really understand people that want to "protect" their creations and get money from them. But content (be it games, movies, music, text etc) has no value on itself since it can be copied and shared easily. If you want to make money you have to add something to your content that will make it desirable for someone to pay for it. In some cases this is easy in others its not.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Why is it a given that there won't be an internet without DRM? I think RMS and supporters of his argument make a very good point when they argue that standardizing DRM encourages it to spread. I don't understand why we are supposed to take it as a given that the internet must have DRM.

                      Why is it such a fad for everyone with an internet connection to write against national governments' attempts at increasing their involvement in internet governance, but anytime someone argues against corporate encroachment into the same, they are labeled as "unrealistic" and "out of touch with reality"?

                      Why is it that governments = bad while corporate = good? Governments at least try to balance the needs of their people against the needs of the corporations that lobby them. Corporations value nothing over their own profitability.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                        Brutal truth indeed.

                        If we are going to deal with DRM in our lives, the least they can do is to standardize its implementation.
                        Before there were platform incompatible flash plugin, now there will be platform incompatible DRM plugins.

                        Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                        Can you think of a better way to stop people from pirating content?

                        Even humble indie bundle games get pirated.
                        Piracy is a good thing! Ability to copy is a good thing! View this as a marketing possibility and offer service to paying customers instead of stupidly selling copies, which everyone can do.
                        I have personally scratched, lost and broken several legal CDs already and I explicitly required to torrent them to make them work! Even Steam has limitation in that it prohibits its users to mod their games, and some games become playable only in modded state.
                        Last edited by brosis; 05-11-2013, 02:37 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Serge View Post
                          Why is it a given that there won't be an internet without DRM? I think RMS and supporters of his argument make a very good point when they argue that standardizing DRM encourages it to spread. I don't understand why we are supposed to take it as a given that the internet must have DRM.
                          Pretty easy: The Internet has already DRM in form of Flash or Silverlight. The content providers demand DRM. So you have either the chance to standardize DRM and make it at least accessible to all OSes or the content providers will stick with the existing solutions, ruling out some OSes (Silverlight) or using dead technology (Flash). Or they come up with their own proprietary clients, of course only for the OSes with the largest marketshare.

                          Why is it such a fad for everyone with an internet connection to write against national governments' attempts at increasing their involvement in internet governance, but anytime someone argues against corporate encroachment into the same, they are labeled as "unrealistic" and "out of touch with reality"?
                          Don't want the DRM connected with services like Netflix? Simple, don't use those services. Don't want your government to spy on you? What to do, not use the government?

                          Why is it that governments = bad while corporate = good? Governments at least try to balance the needs of their people against the needs of the corporations that lobby them.
                          You mean like with the background check for gun purchases in the USA, where the lobbyists prevented those checks against the will of a very large percentage of the population? That didn't work very well, I would think.

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                          • #14
                            I start to dislike google more and more. First, they essentially kill-off youtube by their implementation of DRM regional censorship, then they offer payed channels boosting chance video becomes DRMed/payed even more. Now they lobby DRM extensions, standing on same line as microsoft. :/

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
                              No. And i really understand people that want to "protect" their creations and get money from them. But content (be it games, movies, music, text etc) has no value on itself since it can be copied and shared easily. If you want to make money you have to add something to your content that will make it desirable for someone to pay for it. In some cases this is easy in others its not.
                              Fuck that. Games cost millions of dollars to make, as do movies. TV shows can also be quite expensive. Music isn't free to record. There is value in that if everyone's lazy freeloading worthless ass doesn't pay for it, _it won't get fucking made in the first place_. There is no need for value-add to "pay for this or just don't consume it." There's only assholes who steal other people's hard work and pretend they have a God-given right to consume whatever media whenever they want even if it cost 200 people 3 years of their lives to make. The content has value - either you want to consume it and you pay the asked-for price or you don't pay and then you live your life without ever experiencing the content just like millions upon millions of other people manage to do just fine. Piracy is purely the domain of self-entitled douchebags who want things they haven't earned or worked for. DRM might not be the answer, but "add more value to an $80,000,000 title so I won't freeload" is fucking moronic.

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