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DRM Moves Ahead With HTML5 Specification

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  • #16
    I think this is bad news for the Web.

    First I'd like to point out, that EME only standardizes API for Content Decryption Module (CDM), which is NOT standardized by W3C[source]. So unless someone provides CDM for Linux that Hollywood trusts, you wont be able to use Netflix on Linux conveniently (without Wine). Voddler says it openly here that some content companies don't trust Linux and thus haven't given them rights to show films on Linux. Would they trust Linux now? Even if they trusted, would they work on Firefox and Chromium or only on proprietary Chrome? And the CDMs be maintained and tested on Linux actively?

    So how would this draft advance pluginless web? CDM is much like, if not completely like plugins today. Would CDMs that work on Linux be maintained and tested on Linux actively or will they be abandonded like Adobe Flash (on Linux)? I think that EME only makes situation worse since it actually encourages usage of proprietary plugins (which CDMs are).

    Also, Web does NOT need Big Media Big Media needs the Web. Please read more from here. Big Content companies already provide music without DRM. If they don't provide their content to the Web, they will start losing money.

    I think it would be better that Netflix and others would stop using DRM or just start using Adoble Flash. Even though it's proprietary plugin, it's better alternative than bringing standards to HTML5 that are threat to interoperability and openess of the Web

    I hope this EME draft doesn't go any further.

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    • #17
      Well, thats one of the biggest problems - when you want to buy some software or a game, you absolutely dont know what are you buying, not to mention some facts, that most games and many software doesnt have demo versions, and even demo versions can differ from full products, i.e. performance, plus you can buy some shitty game like that new simcity from shitty company like ea gamez, which likes to leave games unfixed even with critical bugs. So i fully understand piracy, plus its not preventing other people to buy those products.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by elanthis View Post
        Fuck that. Games cost millions of dollars to make, as do movies. TV shows can also be quite expensive. Music isn't free to record. There is value in that if everyone's lazy freeloading worthless ass doesn't pay for it, _it won't get fucking made in the first place_. There is no need for value-add to "pay for this or just don't consume it." There's only assholes who steal other people's hard work and pretend they have a God-given right to consume whatever media whenever they want even if it cost 200 people 3 years of their lives to make. The content has value - either you want to consume it and you pay the asked-for price or you don't pay and then you live your life without ever experiencing the content just like millions upon millions of other people manage to do just fine. Piracy is purely the domain of self-entitled douchebags who want things they haven't earned or worked for. DRM might not be the answer, but "add more value to an $80,000,000 title so I won't freeload" is fucking moronic.
        You are an idiot. All of these content types existed before there was a profit motive to make them. If a musician wants to make money they need to go on tour and play. Their recordings should only be used as a crowd builder and as such given away.

        Movies and TV are needlessly expensive since everyone involved thinks their time is somehow worth $100k per minute.

        Games are also needlessly expensive, I've found more enjoyment in sub $20 games made by a team of 5 people or less and way under a million dollars in development then I have in the vast majority of "AAA" titles that are priced at $50~70 and require you to pay another $5~10 every few months for minor DLC that should have just been part of the actual game.

        To top it all off, all of these twits want to make it harder for the paying customer to actually use what they've paid for. They've fought for the ability ti twist and mangle the rules that define the differences between owning something and simply licensing it so that they can claim that the paying customer has a license to their product, but the company is not liable when said product is defective by design.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by elanthis View Post
          Fuck that. Games cost millions of dollars to make, as do movies. TV shows can also be quite expensive. Music isn't free to record. There is value in that if everyone's lazy freeloading worthless ass doesn't pay for it, _it won't get fucking made in the first place_. There is no need for value-add to "pay for this or just don't consume it." There's only assholes who steal other people's hard work and pretend they have a God-given right to consume whatever media whenever they want even if it cost 200 people 3 years of their lives to make. The content has value - either you want to consume it and you pay the asked-for price or you don't pay and then you live your life without ever experiencing the content just like millions upon millions of other people manage to do just fine. Piracy is purely the domain of self-entitled douchebags who want things they haven't earned or worked for. DRM might not be the answer, but "add more value to an $80,000,000 title so I won't freeload" is fucking moronic.
          Value as in being something that will generate money on itself (since its easy to copy/share). It has cost (ie 80.000.000mil title, studio time etc), and it also has artistic/academic/whatever value. But like it or not thats the case. People will not pay for content on itself.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
            Don't want the DRM connected with services like Netflix? Simple, don't use those services. Don't want your government to spy on you? What to do, not use the government?
            I don't think the two issues are that different. Governments can be changed. I am asking why we don't approach corporate encroachment into our lives the same way.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by elanthis View Post
              Fuck that. Games cost millions of dollars to make, as do movies. TV shows can also be quite expensive. Music isn't free to record. There is value in that if everyone's lazy freeloading worthless ass doesn't pay for it, _it won't get fucking made in the first place_. There is no need for value-add to "pay for this or just don't consume it." There's only assholes who steal other people's hard work and pretend they have a God-given right to consume whatever media whenever they want even if it cost 200 people 3 years of their lives to make. The content has value - either you want to consume it and you pay the asked-for price or you don't pay and then you live your life without ever experiencing the content just like millions upon millions of other people manage to do just fine. Piracy is purely the domain of self-entitled douchebags who want things they haven't earned or worked for. DRM might not be the answer, but "add more value to an $80,000,000 title so I won't freeload" is fucking moronic.
              Everything costs effort and can be expressed in money equivalent!
              The point is how to monetize it properly. Making everyone pay just for copies of DRMed crap is wrong.

              Now, cough out $3,000,000,000 for your DRMed copy of Linux kernel or you are douchebag.

              LMAO "hard work" - every work is hard. The difference is, if you ain't popular and unique, your "hard work" does not interest ANYONE, especially if you restrict it yourself how to distribute it.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
                Well, if that can make Netflix available on Linux, I suppose it's a good thing...
                No, it won't... this will make Netflix available on Android, possibly only on unrooted devices. By balkanizing Linux even more, this will make the chances of getting supported web video on Linux even more remote.

                What's worse, this standard will let content providers restrict the usage of *any* portion of a web page, not only video. This will allow the EME proposers to pay web site owners to make their content only accessible through their proprietary browser, making profits by spying the user's habits through the browser itself and selling the data to advertisers. Once web sites start making money from this scheme, thousands of them will embrace EMEs and therefore will no longer be viewable by open source browsers.

                It can't get worse than this. It's like a zombie but omnipotent Flash encrusted deep into the HTML standard that we'll never get rid of.

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                • #23
                  I signed the partition though. ( free software foundation )

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                  • #24
                    My 2 cents

                    I live in a country where every computer that doesnt come with Windows OS preloaded get 1 pirated copy installed by someone. Not to mention game movies and audio content.Private torrents are full with almost everything u need at a free cost . Like it or not they will never be able to restrict sharing on internet nor they will make money on every ripped movie found on torrents. Thank god we have Russia and hackers and crackers will still pirate everything that moves. So for me everything work on linux couse i dont use or buy disks off any kind when i can get it all free via torrents. Sharing is freedom power belongs to the people!

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by elanthis View Post
                      Fuck that. Games cost millions of dollars to make, as do movies. TV shows can also be quite expensive. Music isn't free to record. There is value in that if everyone's lazy freeloading worthless ass doesn't pay for it, _it won't get fucking made in the first place_. There is no need for value-add to "pay for this or just don't consume it." There's only assholes who steal other people's hard work and pretend they have a God-given right to consume whatever media whenever they want even if it cost 200 people 3 years of their lives to make. The content has value - either you want to consume it and you pay the asked-for price or you don't pay and then you live your life without ever experiencing the content just like millions upon millions of other people manage to do just fine. Piracy is purely the domain of self-entitled douchebags who want things they haven't earned or worked for. DRM might not be the answer, but "add more value to an $80,000,000 title so I won't freeload" is fucking moronic.
                      You talk about piracy, why don't you go after the big gaming, music, and movies caught stealing someone's else creation without paying them a dime with their own rules? That is a sheer of hypocrisy and double standard.

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                      • #26
                        While this won't fix the DRM in HTML5 issue, there's a new bill in Congress that legalizes DRM cracking for instances in which copyrights are not being intentionally violated. This would legalize cell phone unlocking on both the consumer and producer side and end the legal issues with DVD and Blu-Ray DRM cracking by media players to play movies on Linux. I urge all American citizens here to read this and sign the petition and spread it around as much as possible:

                        http://fixthedmca.org/unlocking-technology-act.html

                        I don't know how much support is has in the House right now, but so far the co-sponsorship seems somewhat bi-partisan. If this becomes law, it would be the biggest real copyright reform in a very long time.
                        Last edited by Prescience500; 05-11-2013, 05:06 PM.

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                        • #27
                          So instead of plugins that get updated we will trust media companies to test and update their emes?

                          And I never view drm protected media. So tell me how there will be no web?

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by asdx
                            How long until we get pirated Linux games from Steam?

                            aka hl2, l4d, etc.
                            How long until there won't be Linux games from Steam anymore because some morons think that the artists making the games won't need the money and pirate everything?

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by elanthis View Post
                              Fuck that. Games cost millions of dollars to make, as do movies. TV shows can also be quite expensive. Music isn't free to record. There is value in that if everyone's lazy freeloading worthless ass doesn't pay for it, _it won't get fucking made in the first place_. There is no need for value-add to "pay for this or just don't consume it." There's only assholes who steal other people's hard work and pretend they have a God-given right to consume whatever media whenever they want even if it cost 200 people 3 years of their lives to make. The content has value - either you want to consume it and you pay the asked-for price or you don't pay and then you live your life without ever experiencing the content just like millions upon millions of other people manage to do just fine. Piracy is purely the domain of self-entitled douchebags who want things they haven't earned or worked for. DRM might not be the answer, but "add more value to an $80,000,000 title so I won't freeload" is fucking moronic.
                              I disagree with your views.

                              Piracy is not stealing. Why is it that I can go to a library, and lend a book, or a CD or a movie, read or listen or watch it as many times as I like, let my friends do the same, even make copies of the media for my own use, and no one thinks anything is wrong... but if I do the same over the internet, suddenly I'm a thief, a criminal?

                              That's bullshit. Sharing is good. "Piracy" isn't an issue. Humble Bundle has shown that it doesn't matter: even if there is some piracy, when you're fair and give people good terms, they will pay for content, because people want to support content creators. So DRM is pointless, it only alienates customers and does nothing to deter "piracy".

                              Piracy also doesn't hurt the music or movie industries. That's just an excuse. What they're really afraid is becoming obsolete and losing their position as gatekeepers to the market. Since the internet gives anyone the ability to self-publish and even get funding (kickstarter et al.), totally bypassing all established gatekeeper channels, the old and fat corporations are very afraid of becoming irrelevant. They fear the day when all artists realize they don't have to work as slaves to the publishers/record labels/etc. That's why they make excuses like "piracy" and try to present it as a moral issue, why they try to campaign for even more draconian legislation (SOPA, ACTA) to censor and cripple the web.

                              And that's also why this DRM for HTML5 is a bad thing. It's just another battle in the ongoing war between the old gatekeepers and the new market disruptors. Similar battles can be seen all across the board, in every industry. For example, Microsoft is trying its best to stay as the gatekeeper of the OS market. All of them are fighting a losing battle, because progress cannot be stopped.

                              Oh and before you trot out all the old strawmen, this doesn't mean that everything should be free for everybody. No one is saying that content creators shouldn't be compensated. They should, it's just that they need to develop business models that allow them to get paid without limiting the rights of consumers to share content freely. There are already tons of such business models available, many of them already proven to be feasible.

                              And those of you who say that this is a good thing because "it gets rid of flash and silverlight", who think that DRM is inevitable, that's just not true at all. Even if W3C corrupts the HTML5 standard with DRM, that's no guarantee that content providers won't still implement their own DRM schemes. That's no guarantee that you'll get netflix on Linux. However it would help legitimize DRM and make it easier for content providers to implement. Why should it be easy for them? Why should the slaves make it easier for their masters to whip them to submission? Are we really collectively suffering from Stockholm syndrome, where no matter how much the copyright mafia keeps flogging us, we just bend over and ask for more? I don't think so... we managed to repel ACTA and SOPA, we can fight this too.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                                Can you think of a better way to stop people from pirating content?

                                Even humble indie bundle games get pirated.
                                To be honest yes.

                                Surely the easiest way to reduce piracy is to make the legitimate version at least as good as the pirated version?

                                Selling a crippled version that people can't use without expensive hardware/software is just gonna result in more people pirating, just to get a version they can actually use.

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