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Interesting Insights Into Wine's Development

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  • Interesting Insights Into Wine's Development

    Phoronix: Interesting Insights Into Wine's Development

    Wine, the widely-known open-source software for running Microsoft Windows programs on Linux and other Unix-like operating systems, now weighs in at more than three million lines of code. In this article is some insight into its pace of development, how the CodeWeavers company dominates Wine's development, and other intriguing statistics about this project that's been around for two decades...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTI3OTg

  • #2
    Julian probably has the most knowledge about the most used operating system on the planet. (on consumer PCs) He then also managed to link all that to Linux and MacOS X, so he needs to have deep knowledge about Linux and MacOS X as well.

    Doesn't that make him an uber geek?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
      For me Wine works only for simple windows applications. Anything more and it gives weird errors or doesn't even load. So no. He would have been an uber geek if it worked.
      Have you tried "PlayOnLinux"?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
        For me Wine works only for simple windows applications. Anything more and it gives weird errors or doesn't even load. So no. He would have been an uber geek if it worked.
        To be fair just being to launch anything is a pretty impressive accomplishment. I have also had a lot of trouble with WINE, but I am not necessarily going to hold it against Julian. My main complaint with WINE though is the amount of breakages it has - the current version I am using the sound does not work and winecfg has severe GUI redraw problems.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
          Isn't it just a frontend for wine? I mean if it doesn't work with wine why should I expect it to work with PlayOnLinux?
          It finds a Wine version known to be compatible(but you can easily change it afterward to experiment if you want) and makes all the tweaks for you.
          I got MS Office to work perfectly with this, while I couldn't with plain Wine(but I changed to more recent Wine version to get rid of a bug in PowerPoint). And even a couple games I tried.
          You might have more trouble getting a video to play the way you want through the command line with let's say MPlayer than you would with a fronte-end presenting the option you have in an easily accessible way. Here it's even worse ..
          Wine doesn't exactly work out of the box(although it pretty much did with, let's say, Skyrim, but low performance, at least on AMD, still), but it usually does work.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
            Isn't it just a frontend for wine? I mean if it doesn't work with wine why should I expect it to work with PlayOnLinux?
            PlayOnLinux is more like CrossOver in that it can set up specific wine directories per application with app-specific overrides. So if wine 1.5.22 breaks MS Office 2010, PlayOnLinux can set it up to that MS Office 2010, and only MS Office 2010, has a wine setup that is actually 1.5.21.

            Its more than just "a frontend."

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            • #7
              I think it would be more appropriate to say that Codeweaves "funds" moreso than "dominates". For this reason I get Crossover as well instead of Wine (plus their customer support is great, no more hunting around forums trying various hacks).

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              • #8
                Wine usually has been working quit nice for many years, and for many things.

                However, what really bugs me is when in order to get your fav game working you need that one-liner fix (literally!), and for that you need to recompile the whole shebang. In a 32bit chroot. With hundreds of -dev packages. And nightmares.
                And when there's a new version, the patch isn't intergrated, but just needs to be applied to a different line number. And you have to do it all again. sigh

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by not.sure View Post
                  Wine usually has been working quit nice for many years, and for many things.

                  However, what really bugs me is when in order to get your fav game working you need that one-liner fix (literally!), and for that you need to recompile the whole shebang. In a 32bit chroot. With hundreds of -dev packages. And nightmares.
                  And when there's a new version, the patch isn't intergrated, but just needs to be applied to a different line number. And you have to do it all again. sigh
                  Actually you can blame Debian and Ubuntu for that particular pearl. Red Hat's distros have always used /lib and /lib64, Debian instead used "biarch" (/lib32 and /lib) for a while, then decided that wasn't good enough, and went for "multiarch", ie. /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu and co. Of course than only solved the problem for *lib*, not for *include*, meaning you can't parallel-install development packages for 32 and 64 bit, and you need an independent chroot.

                  Oh and with per-application patching, Windows itself is not very different - it has a bunch of checks for which application is running and alters how things work, so it remains compatible with older apps...

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                  • #10
                    I run a ton of stuff (mostly games) under Debian Wheezy GNU/Linux using Wine. I run a chroot (managed nicely via schroot), and individual wineprefixes for the majority of my apps so it's easy to make any app-specific tweaks if necessary. More often than not, games just work using standard WINE with no patches, DLL overrides or tweaks. It's really impressive - it's came a long way in the last year or so. It's very rare that I hit regressions that are not easily worked around, and Wine's appdb (http://appdb.winehq.org) usually tells you what you need to know when things don't work quite right.

                    The list of games that I have finished via WINE can be seen here: https://systemsaviour.com/finished-games/#GNU"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ericg View Post
                      PlayOnLinux is more like CrossOver in that it can set up specific wine directories per application with app-specific overrides. So if wine 1.5.22 breaks MS Office 2010, PlayOnLinux can set it up to that MS Office 2010, and only MS Office 2010, has a wine setup that is actually 1.5.21.

                      Its more than just "a frontend."
                      To manage prefixes you can use $WINEPREFIX, if you write some scripts you get it too*.
                      The part of manage wine versions is just not a part of wine's job.

                      *I wrote some stuff for it and wrote a CLI prefix manager that, makes working with prefixes and different wine versions easyer:
                      http://code.google.com/p/usenew/sour...c/usenew.sh.in. Debian package is on my project site too.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by boltronics View Post
                        The list of games that I have finished via WINE can be seen here: https://systemsaviour.com/finished-games/#GNU"
                        You should probably replay Unreal, now that it has a native port and all

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                        • #13
                          Wine never works out of the box with most things, but neither does Windows. In fact; allmost all classic games need patches/cracks to work on anything that's older than Vista. There's a reason Windows software employs DLL versioning, and almost any Windows app ships with the DLL versions that they were developped against.

                          Ofcource, if you keep buying/installing anything that requires the latest Windows release, Wine will keep being behind on support, for obvious reasons. That is where virtual machines are for.

                          But for me, Wine is like Dosbox; it keeps legacy stuff running, and Windows simply doesn't.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by not.sure View Post
                            Wine usually has been working quit nice for many years, and for many things.

                            However, what really bugs me is when in order to get your fav game working you need that one-liner fix (literally!), and for that you need to recompile the whole shebang. In a 32bit chroot. With hundreds of -dev packages. And nightmares.
                            And when there's a new version, the patch isn't intergrated, but just needs to be applied to a different line number. And you have to do it all again. sigh
                            My Gentoo install makes compiling and installing so easy .

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                              But for me, Wine is like Dosbox; it keeps legacy stuff running, and Windows simply doesn't.
                              Definitely agree. Modern stuff should be done right (and by right I mean native) but for legacy purposes emulators and compatibility layers definitely do show their value.

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