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QNX is going Open Source

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  • QNX is going Open Source

    For all of you who want to see how this successfull microkernel OS is written, QNX is opening sources
    of the Neutrino Kernel (Version 6):

    http://www.qnx.com/news/pr_2471_1.html

  • #2
    Originally posted by mlau View Post
    For all of you who want to see how this successfull microkernel OS is written, QNX is opening sources
    of the Neutrino Kernel (Version 6):

    http://www.qnx.com/news/pr_2471_1.html
    I'd rather not. It's not really Open Source. Not even close. It's Source Available- if you use any knowledge coming away from a reading of their codebase, you might taint another project. Now, if I had to USE QNX as opposed to ecOS or RTEMS, it might be a little different story. As it stands, I only have to use VXWorks and very probably only for a short time longer before the client switches over to embedded Linux and takes advantage of all the muscle that an embedded X86 board brings to the table for what they're needing. They don't need real-time in the traditional sense, they just need good worst-case timings and hardened, embedded operation in an OS. Linux does this in spades with the current crop of PIII/PIV class motherboards that are industrial/mil-spec rated.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Svartalf View Post
      I'd rather not. It's not really Open Source. Not even close. It's Source Available- if you use any knowledge coming away from a reading of their codebase, you might taint another project.
      Yes, my mistake, Sorry.

      Originally posted by Svartalf
      Now, if I had to USE QNX as opposed to ecOS or RTEMS, it might be a little different story. As it stands, I only have to use VXWorks and very probably only for a short time longer before the client switches over to embedded Linux and takes advantage of all the muscle that an embedded X86 board brings to the table for what they're needing. They don't need real-time in the traditional sense, they just need good worst-case timings and hardened, embedded operation in an OS. Linux does this in spades with the current crop of PIII/PIV class motherboards that are industrial/mil-spec rated.
      Well, I *AM* a QNX user and driver developer (SH-4), so I welcome this step since QNX's Documentation sucks big time (well so does every doc I've ever read).

      In my experience Linux is far more "efficient" when
      it comes to moving data around; QNX is snappier and
      drivers are far easier to debug (can't beat killing a
      driver by issuing a "kill -15" and attaching GDB to it).

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      • #4
        WNX sounds cool, I seen a demo where QNX and a basic web browser can fit on a single floppy. Neat stuff though. Is QNX using a license something like Shared Source?

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        • #5
          cool stuff

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