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The Linux 3.7 Kernel Is Going To Be A Beast

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  • The Linux 3.7 Kernel Is Going To Be A Beast

    Phoronix: The Linux 3.7 Kernel Is Going To Be A Beast

    The Linux 3.6 kernel isn't even one week old, but the Linux 3.7 kernel is already looking very exciting with enough changes for an open-source enthusiast to be giddy...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE5OTU

  • #2
    Exactly who is stopping you from using PPA's?
    Last edited by RussianNeuroMancer; 10-05-2012, 08:55 AM.

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    • #3
      Linux kernel 3.7 is great for ARM.

      Personally, I would like to see the nouveau driver support Wayland.

      Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
      And we're stuck to 3.5 for another 6 months in Ubuntu...Yay.
      http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
        And we're stuck to 3.5 for another 6 months in Ubuntu...Yay.
        http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/

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        • #5
          I love the clever comments of people using non-rolling distributions bitching about their distributions not being rolling...

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          • #6
            smap - a cloud feature?

            smap - is it a cloud feature?

            Enabling cloud service providers to be undeniable ethical to customers?

            All left-over interventional kernel functions into user-virtual space are unmutable logged by journald?

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            • #7
              Will this be the good one?

              How many times I read this one? "the next kernel will boost your GPU" and, kernel after kernel, the performance is more or less the same, and the new incredible features will be "merged in the next version". Always the next. For years.
              Why are you so sure the 3.7 will do the difference?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by freedam View Post
                I love the clever comments of people using non-rolling distributions bitching about their distributions not being rolling...
                Why don't people set up separate /home partitions?

                I've always done this, and from what I experience this whole "rolling distribution" vs "non-rolling distribution" is a nonsensical argument.

                Format the / partition, and when the "new" operating system comes up after installation it inherits all of the prior settings that still reside in /home. It takes minutes to select the various apps I use, and the let the computer do all the work installing. Done. Now I'm on the "new" operating system, and it's a clean install which is good to do every now and then anyways.

                What am I missing?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by freedam View Post
                  I love the clever comments of people using non-rolling distributions bitching about their distributions not being rolling...
                  Probably better to be non-rolling than my Arch install that bricks itself every month - till I fix it manually!!

                  New kernels meh...

                  Bob

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bobwya View Post
                    Probably better to be non-rolling than my Arch install that bricks itself every month - till I fix it manually!!

                    New kernels meh...

                    Bob
                    I never have issues with Arch. I really wonder what people do to their installations...

                    And new kernels are a must-have for those of us with new computers. When I made the jump from 3.1 to 3.4 in opensuse (before I used arch), it was a night a day difference.

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                    • #11
                      Wii Fit board support! Woot!

                      (...now what the frak am I actually going to do with it...?)

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                      • #12
                        Weigh yourself, foot controlled pointer (accessibility), pressure sensitive switch for alarm system to differentiate between pets and humans, advanced feature rich whoopy cushion, etc.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by halfmanhalfamazing View Post
                          Why don't people set up separate /home partitions?

                          I've always done this, and from what I experience this whole "rolling distribution" vs "non-rolling distribution" is a nonsensical argument.

                          Format the / partition, and when the "new" operating system comes up after installation it inherits all of the prior settings that still reside in /home. It takes minutes to select the various apps I use, and the let the computer do all the work installing. Done. Now I'm on the "new" operating system, and it's a clean install which is good to do every now and then anyways.

                          What am I missing?
                          Some things you're missing is that:
                          1. Not all settings are stored in /home.. think /etc
                          2. Having to install a new OS every few months is not the same as continuously updating packages.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tancrackers View Post
                            I never have issues with Arch. I really wonder what people do to their installations...

                            And new kernels are a must-have for those of us with new computers. When I made the jump from 3.1 to 3.4 in opensuse (before I used arch), it was a night a day difference.
                            Yeh, I guess I like to kick the tyres around I do enjoy pulling it back from the brink to full working order though... I do find the way systemd just locks at boot, with the slightest configuration error, somewhat annoying though...

                            Personally I was set with the Ubuntu 10.04 kernel - since it was the first kernel (2.6.32 or something) that fully supported SATA port-multipliers for my Server. I would give up newer kernels for more development money thrown at Wine - in a heart beat... But then I then to sit on older hardware (a core i7 920 Nehalem-based system is my newest kit just now).

                            Bob

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tancrackers View Post
                              I never have issues with Arch. I really wonder what people do to their installations...

                              And new kernels are a must-have for those of us with new computers. When I made the jump from 3.1 to 3.4 in opensuse (before I used arch), it was a night a day difference.
                              No issues? Do you use twm with vesa or no window manager and plain console? Still there would be issues ..
                              Or having to reconfigure stuff etc after every few updates does not count?
                              I recall once it randomly stopped booting with kernel panic, good thing I was too lazy to remove my failed self compiled kernel .. So I had something that could at least .. boot ..
                              Arch is also unusable to me without unofficial packages(be it unofficial repos, AUR or something else), which are, according to Arch developers, bound to cause problems.
                              It's cool and all. but needs you to try to tame it all the time.

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