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Mono 2.11.3 Packs In Microsoft's Entity Framework

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  • Mono 2.11.3 Packs In Microsoft's Entity Framework

    Phoronix: Mono 2.11.3 Packs In Microsoft's Entity Framework

    Running fresh off $12M USD in funding, Miguel de Icaza's Xamarin has released their fourth preview release of Mono 2.11...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE1OTQ

  • #2
    Mono is meant to exist because microsoft knows one day,soon or later, linux will take over windows. doing mono will ensure microsoft to live within linux and act like a patent troll like they already do with android. of course there are plenty of reasons why mono may be a good thing, but that doesn't change the reason microsoft is doing all this.

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    • #3
      Microsoft open-sourced something?

      The Microsoft Entity Framework is an object-relational mapping framework for .NET that Microsoft recently open-sourced under the Apache 2.0 License.
      Just wanted to make sure that was seen. Microsoft certainly deserves much of the hate that's aimed its way, but sometimes it gets so over the top.............

      This is certainly a step in the right direction. Even they see the light: Open source is the future.

      Comment


      • #4
        What, did they open source their .NET implementation?

        No? Then please go away.

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        • #5
          This is great.
          It is very useful for people wishing to run their ASP.NET web applications on Mono.

          I think Entity Framework is pretty popular with enterprise ASP.NET MVC web applications.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by halfmanhalfamazing View Post
            Just wanted to make sure that was seen. Microsoft certainly deserves much of the hate that's aimed its way, but sometimes it gets so over the top.............

            This is certainly a step in the right direction. Even they see the light: Open source is the future.
            sadly nope, microsoft did this not for the goodness of their heart or cause they believe in open source[they not], they do it for this reasons:

            1.) to add value to the closed source version[which has more features and is windows only btw] so they can say .NET is not windows only and you can use it in other OSes[which is very unlikely to happen since mono is quite behind] but is good for PR.
            2.) to avoid monopoly lawsuits in euro zone cuz .NET is "open source" and again good for PR.
            3.) xamarian works good as charity to deduce taxes and as troy horse[in theory cuz .NET outside windows is less than non existant].
            4.) possible patent wreck in the future when they need to milk some cash from big sharks that migrated to Mono [they say no but microsoft is well microsoft]
            5.) avoid migration to other toolkit/languages promising "multiplataform greatness" so they can keep milking you in windows[dubious advertisement but most sysadmin in bussiness arent the sharper knife of the box]

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            • #7
              Mono

              So many versions and yet, nobody gives a shit.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                This is great.
                It is very useful for people wishing to run their ASP.NET web applications on Mono.

                I think Entity Framework is pretty popular with enterprise ASP.NET MVC web applications.
                is faster and more secure to use PHP than migrate to mono ASP.NET, i know lots of ppl that tried and preferred to use php/java instead[after several rage kicks to the servers and mad mad words]

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mirza View Post
                  So many versions and yet, nobody gives a shit.
                  well for miguel icaza is good get tons of cash to keep a deadmen walking

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
                    is faster and more secure to use PHP than migrate to mono ASP.NET, i know lots of ppl that tried and preferred to use php/java instead[after several rage kicks to the servers and mad mad words]
                    I have been developing PHP for years, and still do some PHP development at home.
                    At my work place we use .NET.

                    PHP is an interpreted language while .NET is compiled so .NET is much much faster than PHP.
                    Also with .NET you have access to the whole .NET framework, a huge set of libraries which you can do much more than you can do with PHP.
                    With ASP.NET you have a nice debugger and a huge framework.

                    Comparing PHP to ASP.NET is comparing apples and pears. PHP is just a language. ASP.NET is a whole framework.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
                      sadly nope, microsoft did this not for the goodness of their heart or cause they believe in open source
                      I certainly don't believe that. I was thinking (some) more because of the reasons you stated, or because their backs are up against a wall in a way. They have to open source somethings, to make a good show of it.

                      My main suggestion would probably be this: I'd bet we can get even more code from them in the future.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                        I have been developing PHP for years, and still do some PHP development at home.
                        At my work place we use .NET.

                        PHP is an interpreted language while .NET is compiled so .NET is much much faster than PHP.
                        Also with .NET you have access to the whole .NET framework, a huge set of libraries which you can do much more than you can do with PHP.
                        With ASP.NET you have a nice debugger and a huge framework.

                        Comparing PHP to ASP.NET is comparing apples and pears. PHP is just a language. ASP.NET is a whole framework.
                        .NET is not a compiled language is an interpreted language with a packer and a JIT VM[thats why is so easy to dissasemble] thats why you need to keep the .NET framework everywhere[in the case of ASP.NET the framewrok is called from IIS].

                        php is another interpreted language but without packer aka you cannot create a .EXE with it but i beg to differ with you here since PHP has API to do almost everything an OS can do LOL[at least in linux] through plugins[you can even call ffmpeg api from php]

                        in my experience .NET is not faster than c/c++/pascal/cobol/fortran[<--- real compiled languages] nor seen ASP.Net code faster than PHP+nginx [would be interesting to show some use cases where you find aps been faster than php][or you mean on windows? in that case is possible]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by halfmanhalfamazing View Post
                          I certainly don't believe that. I was thinking (some) more because of the reasons you stated, or because their backs are up against a wall in a way. They have to open source somethings, to make a good show of it.

                          My main suggestion would probably be this: I'd bet we can get even more code from them in the future.
                          the problem is the only they has given is code [apache/bsd licenses i think] and the promise they won't sue you to death cuz they own the patents and copyrights and they havent let those go or make any attempt to add them to a patent protection pool[at least as far i looked] so the risk is always there[for big bussiness they won't come you or me ofc]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
                            .NET is not a compiled language is an interpreted language with a packer and a JIT VM[thats why is so easy to dissasemble] thats why you need to keep the .NET framework everywhere[in the case of ASP.NET the framewrok is called from IIS].

                            php is another interpreted language but without packer aka you cannot create a .EXE with it but i beg to differ with you here since PHP has API to do almost everything an OS can do LOL[at least in linux] through plugins[you can even call ffmpeg api from php]

                            in my experience .NET is not faster than c/c++/pascal/cobol/fortran[<--- real compiled languages] nor seen ASP.Net code faster than PHP+nginx [would be interesting to show some use cases where you find aps been faster than php][or you mean on windows? in that case is possible]
                            JIT is not an interpreter! Is a Just-In-Time compiler. Also .Net is a platform (which includes a VM, that is in case of .Net a JIT, and in case of Compact Framework an interpreter). The JIT generated code is as hard (or as easy) as any C++ code, and the base code is as hard to decrypt (if you mean the the .Net's bytecode that defines the programs, there are many obfuscators to make sure that no one can read them).
                            When we talk both about .Net and about Mono, because they are not interpreters, they can generate output of the program which is fully compiled (as .so on Linux, and as native .dll on Windows) that is used to execute the code you are running.
                            There are many cases when .Net code works in the same performance range as it would be written in a native language, like Paint.Net/Pinta, sometimes they may work even faster (MonoDevelop/SharpDevelop in .Net/Mono world, or Eclipse/IntelliJ IDEA) than their opensource equivalents (Adjunta, DevC++), sometimes slower (in Java world, comes Netbeans to mind, even though Netbeans improved a lot the performance in the last releases).
                            In the list of languages, I'm really familiar with Pascal, and I can say that is not faster than C# on Linux. FreePascal is basically tied performance wise (even though memory wise Pascal seems to be the most efficient of all): http://shootout.alioth.debian.org/u6...l&lang2=csharp Anyway, I'm thinking that statically compiled with LLVM may run faster on phones (like Mono for Android or for iOS) than the FreePascal equivalent. The reason is because Mono can be compiled into optimized code, and FreePascal has a more limited optimizer (is in the same class as the JIT of Mono, it performs a bit more optimizations, but it has no good registry allocator).
                            At the end, did you tried in your real applications to use Mono? To see if is fast(er)? Are you using just XSP and based on this you make up your mind?
                            As for my machine, I did precompile most of applications on Mono (search for AOT = ahead of time compilation), to reduce startup time, but performance wise otherwise is really unoticiable (I think it should be faster in JIT mode).
                            Do you have any numbers when Mono is slow to you?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
                              the problem is the only they has given is code [apache/bsd licenses i think] and the promise they won't sue you to death cuz they own the patents and copyrights and they havent let those go or make any attempt to add them to a patent protection pool[at least as far i looked] so the risk is always there
                              Hasn't that theory been tested though?

                              They put themselves in a bad position of open sourcing something. Then to proceed to suing anybody for using it, isn't that a bit of pandora's box going on?

                              I would think that some Google/Java/Oracle applies here. Microsoft might be able to say to another company that you can't use this, but for users out in the wilderness, I don't see where they'd have ground to stand on. It would be clearly predatory, and I couldn't see a jury in the world that would indict.

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