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  • #16
    Originally posted by joffe View Post
    However, with FreeBSD, OpenIndiana, and Solaris 11 around - do you really want to?
    I've got a 5.something Terrabyte raidz array in my HTPC. I've had it running well over a year now with few issues. The data integrety has been perfect, however, there is an annoying bug that causes the system to hang from time to time if performing small write operations on one of the files over Samba.

    In theory, for reliable software raid 5, raidz can't be beat. I think practice is still catching up to theory, but I hope they keep working on it.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by timofonic View Post
      If ZFS wants to survive outside Solaris and their Open Source forks, a dual licensing must be made in some form and included into the vanilla kernel.

      Other than that, this is like the fanatics wanting to use Reiser4 into Linux 3.x. It's just a pipe dream that's going nowhere.
      I disagree. ReiserFS was never that great of a filesystem implementation to begin with. Of the 13 years I've been running linux on various machines the only time I've lost data due to filesystem corruption was when using Reiser, and it happened twice inside a year.

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      • #18
        snapraid

        Originally posted by timofonic View Post
        If ZFS wants to survive outside Solaris and their Open Source forks, a dual licensing must be made in some form and included into the vanilla kernel.

        Other than that, this is like the fanatics wanting to use Reiser4 into Linux 3.x. It's just a pipe dream that's going nowhere.

        Please be more realistic, even HAMMER2 is a more viable option once Matt Dillon agrees on some kind of interoperatibility between non-BSD UNIX-like systems.

        But what about Btrfs?

        What about distributed file systems? CRFS, FhGFS, Tahoe-LAFS, Ceph, Lustre, MooseFS, GFS2, OCFS, OneFS, XtreemFS, GlusterFS, HAMMER2 (seems it will have those features), pNFS, AFS.

        What I mean is not just a new, scalable and proper and efficient network filesystem, but also RAID-like capabilities. That could make commodity hardware to get into cheap RAID solutions to avoid data losing.



        So what about an article about that instead beating a dead horse like ZFS? Despite all the hype in the past, it reduces interoperability between al UNIXes (and non-UNIXes).
        The best I've found is snapraid. It is similar to unraid except it doesn't do realtime raid. Using snapraid with mhhdfs will let you "jbod" a bunch of disks together, designate another disk or two for parity BUT doesn't have the arrary limitations of raid so there's no risk of losing all your data, and it does integrity checks so no bit rot. The developer is working on adding a third parity disk, based on zfs code, but its not there yet.
        Its really a fantastic and well engineered project.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by timofonic View Post
          So what about an article about that instead beating a dead horse like ZFS? Despite all the hype in the past, it reduces interoperability between al UNIXes (and non-UNIXes).
          It anyone's reducing the interoperability between al UNIXes its Linux with its restrictive GPL, BSDs/Illumos does not have these issues.

          Dead horse? Nigga please ... ZFS thrives, both on Illumos and BSDs, You can even use now Boot Environments on FreeBSD: http://forums.freebsd.org/showthread.php?t=31662

          Originally posted by linuxoid View Post
          The other thing I've heard about ZFS is it's a RAM hog. You need at least 2GB just to get going with it.And if I play games or just want a good desktop experience isn't low-latency essential?
          Depends what You want to do with ZFS, it can work with 512 MB RAM (I used that size many time in virtual machines) and also with 512 GB RAM (for serious SAN work).

          ZFS can use all memory if YOU ALLOW it for, but You can limit ARC size to the size You want, and ZFS will stop there, for example You can 'sacrifice' 256MB for ZFS ARC (CACHE) and it will not take more.

          Deduplication is other thing, You need about 2-3GB RAM for every 1 TB of data, but if You have 40TB for example, You do not need 120GB RAM, You can successfully use ZFS with about 40GB RAM with 80 GB SSD for L2ARC. You can also use 40TB pool under ZFS with, for example 4GB RAM, but reading all hashes directly from disk will be dead slow, RAM in deduplication is needed to hold the hash table for the deduplicated blocks.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by mgmartin View Post
            SMP works just fine. The restriction is on the preemption model: You can't use CONFIG_PREEMPT ( low latency desktop ) , you need either CONFIG_PREEMPT_VOLUNTARY or CONFIG_PREEMPT_NONE .

            Linux xxxxxx 3.3.4+ #8 SMP Fri Apr 27 15:30:00 MDT 2012 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
            Sorry that's what I meant. Tried it and vary bad for a desktop multitasking situation.

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            • #21
              Funny how I've usually run with PREEMPT_VOLUNTARY and even IOSCHED_DEADLINE on desktops, without noticing any lag.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by linux5850 View Post
                Sorry that's what I meant. Tried it and vary bad for a desktop multitasking situation.
                Also, note that the lack of preemption support this isn't by design - it's a bug. Work is underway to fix it.

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                • #23
                  I have been using ZoL for quite a while now. Its a very mature project and much more stable than Btrfs. Order of magnitude difference in stability. And sequential transfer speed is close to platter. Random access speed is better than Btrfs/ext4.

                  I see no reason for not using ZoL. You need kernel sources for the kernel you are running, build a set of modules & utilities (./configure && make && make install kinda) and modprobe the modules and you are in business. Many usable distros already have packages which do all this for you. I personally use Gentoo and its the easiest to get ZoL on.

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                  • #24
                    me too

                    Been using native ZFS on my mythbox+NAS for the best part of a year. I love it: SSD cache, dedup, in-filesystem compression, snapshots - a poor man's netapp!

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