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PulseAudio 2.0 Is Set To Be Released Very Soon

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  • #11
    Originally posted by gigaplex View Post
    KDE already has adopted PulseAudio, the integration is pretty good. I'm not sure about your particular use case, however.
    Yeah but it's a nightmare when you want to record an application's sound and not to whole mixer channel. I guess this comes down to software. Much of the software has come from the era of those that hated concepts like PulseAudio.

    i personally think KDE team really need to jazz up the sound base abilities and include a sound recorder to record particular virtual channels. This would shut up any short falls.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by MNKyDeth View Post
      At least there are distro's out there like Gentoo where you can remove this parasite piece of software from the compile time options. Either that or LFS or any other source based distro.
      Are you fairdinkum. Pulse Audio has been the best thing that's happened for Linux. Linux movement just needs to get down pat the GFX core and it's all rockets to the moon.

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      • #13
        I'm particularly looking forward to alternate sample rates. Up till now, I have compromised by using 88.2KHz. It's close enough to 96KHz but also exactly double 44.1KHz so resampling CD audio doesn't require as much CPU power as 96KHz would. It did produce crackles in non-CD audio in earlier versions but that seems to be fixed now. Still, this new feature seems like a better approach so I'd like to give it a try.

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        • #14
          The best news is that PulseAudio now has a fixed release cycle. Until now PA has a very unpredictable release cycle and a buggy release could have been the latest release for about a year.
          If it means that PA will finally properly work on my system, I'm fully in favor of it.

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          • #15
            I think there are no traces of PulseAudio in my Slackware distro so all programs are using Alsa directly. What critical features I am missing?

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            • #16
              fixed Hurd operating system support
              Finally, this was a real deal-breaker for me.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Azpegath View Post
                Finally, this was a real deal-breaker for me.
                I'm not sure whether that was a joke or not.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Chewi View Post
                  I'm not sure whether that was a joke or not.
                  . . . .

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Chewi View Post
                    I'm particularly looking forward to alternate sample rates. Up till now, I have compromised by using 88.2KHz. It's close enough to 96KHz but also exactly double 44.1KHz so resampling CD audio doesn't require as much CPU power as 96KHz would. It did produce crackles in non-CD audio in earlier versions but that seems to be fixed now. Still, this new feature seems like a better approach so I'd like to give it a try.
                    AFAIK, unless you have a somewhat old crappy sound source, the sound card itself tends to process that stuff, not the CPU. I'm pretty sure most integrated audio chips in the recent years do have their own mini-processors. Also, how do you know your sound card can even handle sample rates as high as 96KHz?

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                      AFAIK, unless you have a somewhat old crappy sound source, the sound card itself tends to process that stuff, not the CPU. I'm pretty sure most integrated audio chips in the recent years do have their own mini-processors. Also, how do you know your sound card can even handle sample rates as high as 96KHz?
                      I know because I have an ASUS Xonar D2X, which is capable of 192KHz. If I tried to push more than this through the card, I suspect ALSA would kick up a fuss. I'm no expert either but I gather hardware mixing is the key and contrary to some comments here, this feature is missing from more than just the cheapest sound cards. Creative have spoiled us with cards that have all the bells and whistles while other high-end cards focus on playing just one sound well. My card doesn't have hardware mixing and yet the otherwise crappy ALi integrated card from my old 2004 Sony Vaio does. Note the HWMIX tag present on the ALi page but absent on the ASUS page. If I'd realised the ASUS card didn't have hardware mixing before I bought it, I might have gone for something else but PulseAudio sidesteps this issue as well as providing better sound quality and reliable handling of surround sound than ALSA with dmix does. Trust me, I was a PulseAudio refusenik in the beginning and I tried really hard to make dmix work but no amount of fiddling with asoundrc allowed me to mix surround sound with other sources. I also tried JACK, which was good except that it had no way of automatically upmixing stereo to surround. PulseAudio, on the other hand, worked great out of the box. It's also not the resource hog that everyone makes it out to be. Right now, I see that it is using a whopping 4MB. Wow. As for CPU usage, that is down to the fact that it resamples using a much better quality algorithm than dmix does by default. Ubuntu changed the PulseAudio default resampler for this very reason. dmix can also be configured to use libsamplerate instead, for a fairer comparison.

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