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Adobe Announces Plans To Abandon Flash On Linux

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  • #31
    Bad/sensationalist title, Adobe isn't abandoning Linux, it's moving to a new architecture and not supporting the old one on Linux, not to mention they'll support 11.2 for a few years, after which a life without flash will be quite plausible. Youtube already switches to HTML5 when viewing some videos without asking me (and no, I haven't joined the youtube HTML5 trial).

    So things aren't nearly as bad as the title implies.
    Last edited by cl333r; 02-22-2012, 11:37 AM.

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    • #32
      This is terrible.

      HTML5 is not ready to do live streaming video.

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      • #33
        Compare to Engadget's coverage.

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        • #34
          It sounds like in the short to mid-term this isn't going to be an issue, as they plan to still support 11.2 for some time. (which is good since i use Firefox).

          Hopefully over the next year or two video streaming sites will switch to HTML5, and drop Flash. I'd also like to see them drop DivX too.

          At this point, while it is great that youtube supports HTML5, most video streaming sites do NOT - so Adobe Flash still has some value and use in this regard, for me and others i am sure.

          bye bye Adobe, your a bunch of dicks who won't port the Creative Suite or even Photoshop, anyway ~ so F U all. LOL.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by ninez View Post
            Hopefully, this is just a sign that flash is on it's way out.

            Regardless, it sounds like flash 11.2 will be maintained for quite a while - so at least i can stick with flash in Firefox, for now. Hopefully, by the time it becomes a problem, either A) flash will be less popular or B) mozilla or alternate flash implementation will be in place.
            So 5 years should be enough time for all the Flash alternatives to become mature and rock-stable and its at least a good thing Adobe will provide security updates during that time.

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            • #36
              Michael... Since flash will be on it's way out... you should get rid of the flash ads and replace them with images or text ads! (I've had flash disabled for a while.. and usually only 1 ad in 5 will show up on your site with flash disabled) or at least get it so that it can detect if flash is enabled or not and replace the adds with text ones if flash isn't available.

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              • #37
                Pepper

                I am not so read up on this, but as I understand it Pepper is more secure and portable than NPAPI.
                So I think Mozilla should implement Pepper, since that would make sense.

                Flash has a history of multiple security vulnerabilities, so if using Pepper instead of NPAPI makes it more secure, then that makes sense.


                It is very sad to hear that Adobe will stop making Flash for Linux, especially since they finnally got it to 64-bit.
                Why is this? Is it because they thought hardware acceleration was tricky with VDPAU, VA-API, and dozen of other APIs?

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by ua=42 View Post
                  Michael... Since flash will be on it's way out... you should get rid of the flash ads and replace them with images or text ads! (I've had flash disabled for a while.. and usually only 1 ad in 5 will show up on your site with flash disabled) or at least get it so that it can detect if flash is enabled or not and replace the adds with text ones if flash isn't available.
                  He doesn't have direct control over the ads..

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                  • #39
                    I disagree

                    I just read TFA from Adobe and I understand all. It's not that Adobe is dropping support; they know that Linux upgrade cycles are extremely short compared to Windows / Mac OS X, they will maintain Flash 11.2 basically to fulfill the demands of Debian Stable / RHEL / SLES users, and they will attempt to move everyone in Linux to PPAPI.

                    I even APPLAUD this move. Linux are always the guys who start the trends, and that will be preserved. The first ones with a 64 bit Flash plugin, the first ones with the next-gen plugin API.

                    I see Adobe hasn't defined how it's going to distribute the plugin, and that's because nothing but Chrome supports PPAPI. If Firefox doesn't want to support PPAPI, I bet 1,000 internets that Webkit will support it, and every Linux user is going to ditch Firefox and run Konqueror + KWebkitPart, Rekonq, or Midori with PPAPI support, instead.

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                    • #40
                      5 years of support for 11.2 is pretty decent...
                      I wonder how the new Chrome-only version will handle stand-alone Flash stuff though (Machinarium comes to mind).

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