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Testing EXT4 & Btrfs On A Serial ATA 3.0 SSD

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  • #16
    What about ZFS?

    The comparison was very informative and useful, Michael.

    However, an argument could be made that BTRFS lags behind EXT4 for the simple reason that the checksumming and healing power it offers is simply costing something. I think it would help the comparison a lot if Debian/kFreeBSD (or native FreeBSD) was installed in the same machine, and the benchmarks were run under ZFS, too.

    That way, BTRFS would be compared to ZFS, which has similar features: checksums, snapshots, etc.

    Just my 2c.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by liam View Post
      You're assuming performance is the raison d'etre for btrfs, but the big gain would be in the snapshotting. You would no longer have unrecoverable systems due updates. You would be able to safely update your system from release to release without doing a reinstall (this doesn't mean the update would work but it would mean that it would be safe). These are ease of use features that would be fantastic to have and that's ignoring the data assurances it provides.
      No, I do not assume performance is the reason for btrfs, but the lack of performance will be its downfall. *I* don't care how magical the snapshot abilities are, I will not knowingly allow my performance to be sacrificed like that. Then again, I don't run beta distributions and do not have updates fail.

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      • #18
        Copying files shouldn't introduce latency in your desktop experience.
        It shouldn't but it has plagued the Linux desktop for years (not that Windows fares much better though) even though it has been highly improved over the years, or I have simply bought better hw over the years

        However I don't really think that we will find 100% of the problem in the kernel since I have never seen a server drop latency do to heavy I/O so perhaps our window managers access the disk more than they should and that is why is the cause of these latencies when there is high I/O. Or the I/O system gets completely clogged up so there can be no I/O over for keyboard and mouse (they are I/O operations as well).

        And this not that far fetched since we all remember the Firefox + ext3 fsync fiasco. Who would think before that that Firefox would have latencies due to disk activity...

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        • #19
          EXT4, BTRFS, NTFS-3G & NTFS-W7 ... please.

          The supposedly superior EXT4 does not have encryption nor compression. NTFS-3G is not the same as NTFS-W7, but BTRFS is, with compression, file-permissions, multiple-dates, & encryption.

          Personally all my data & archive files are NTFS-W7 (which differs from previous versions of NTFS). Linux, which I use for most functions, most times, uses EXT4 partitions, but creates many incompatibilities with NTFS-W7: non-MS file names, multiple same-name files & seemingly rare & random write errors onto compressed NTFS-W7 partitions.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by gregzeng View Post
            The supposedly superior EXT4 does not have encryption nor compression. NTFS-3G is not the same as NTFS-W7, but BTRFS is, with compression, file-permissions, multiple-dates, & encryption.

            Personally all my data & archive files are NTFS-W7 (which differs from previous versions of NTFS). Linux, which I use for most functions, most times, uses EXT4 partitions, but creates many incompatibilities with NTFS-W7: non-MS file names, multiple same-name files & seemingly rare & random write errors onto compressed NTFS-W7 partitions.
            Most of ext4's improvements were to make scaling better and improve performance while not changing TOO much code. The point was to be an incremental upgrade not breaking the bank to build fort knox (or whatever appropriate metaphor you like).
            Compression, presumably, would've forced more changes than T'so liked, and encryption is handled by a lower level system (in the nix tradition of "small" programs doing "small" tasks) that any fs (saving btrfs, at least) can take advantage of.

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            • #21
              Personally all my data & archive files are NTFS-W7 (which differs from previous versions of NTFS). Linux, which I use for most functions, most times, uses EXT4 partitions, but creates many incompatibilities with NTFS-W7: non-MS file names, multiple same-name files & seemingly rare & random write errors onto compressed NTFS-W7 partitions
              There is no difference in the on-disk-format of NTFS in XP and NTFS in Win7. And why are you storing all your data on NTFS, it's prone to the very errors that you list (case insensitive filesystem, no checksums of data).

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              • #22
                Originally posted by gregzeng View Post
                The supposedly superior EXT4 does not have encryption nor compression. NTFS-3G is not the same as NTFS-W7, but BTRFS is, with compression, file-permissions, multiple-dates, & encryption.

                Personally all my data & archive files are NTFS-W7 (which differs from previous versions of NTFS). Linux, which I use for most functions, most times, uses EXT4 partitions, but creates many incompatibilities with NTFS-W7: non-MS file names, multiple same-name files & seemingly rare & random write errors onto compressed NTFS-W7 partitions.
                What the hell is NTFS-W7 ?

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