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Tuxera Claims NTFS Is The Fastest File-System For Linux

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  • Tuxera Claims NTFS Is The Fastest File-System For Linux

    Phoronix: Tuxera Claims NTFS Is The Fastest File-System For Linux

    Coincidently there's some more file-system news after just writing about the EXT4 and Btrfs file-systems with the Linux 3.0 kernel. A Phoronix reader has pointed out that a developer at Tuxera is claiming their proprietary NTFS Linux kernel driver makes the Microsoft file-system the fastest choice under Linux. Reportedly this kernel driver that implements Microsoft NTFS support is about twice as fast as EXT4, the main Linux file-system of choice right now...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTU5Ng

  • #2
    This person should really make a ext4 driver with those algorithms that speed stuff up.

    It's not NTFS that's faster, it's a driver that's faster because of some algorithm.

    Maybe (because I'm not familiar with filesystems) it doesn't even matter that much and ext4 driver with those features beats that ntfs driver again.

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    • #3
      nice but how it will affect us? non windows users?

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      • #4
        Faster at doing what?

        I doubt NTFS is faster at everything while providing the same features as EXT4, XFS and Btrfs so bring on the benchmarks and show us!

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        • #5
          What about

          Tuxera-NTFS on Linux vs MS-NTFS on Win7?

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          • #6
            Indeed, I'd rather have a file system that is slower but doesn't eat your data for lunch. And yea, it seems that it's an algorithm that does that, although it could be specific to NTFS.

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            • #7
              A couple points.

              1. This is probably on an unfragmented filesystem. Given NTFS's tendency to fragment, this performance would never happen in the real world.

              2. NTFS doesn't have all that extra security code it needs to run. "Permissions? What's that?"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by pvtcupcakes View Post
                A couple points.

                1. This is probably on an unfragmented filesystem. Given NTFS's tendency to fragment, this performance would never happen in the real world.

                2. NTFS doesn't have all that extra security code it needs to run. "Permissions? What's that?"
                Uhh, you apparently know nothing about NTFS. NTFS is all about security. It has a more complex permission system than the Unix standard, with more than just read/write/execute, but 7 or 8 different permission types and it is all done via cascading ACLs, rather than the simplistic owner/group/everybody model. As a result, permission checking is slower and more complicated than on standard Unix. There is also per-file encryption and compression, which can further slow things down (if used).

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                • #9
                  "proprietary NTFS Linux kernel driver "

                  do i use a free and opensource system to install an proprietary file system??? LOOL!

                  i also use the radeon driver and not the catalyst.... those people should just shut up no one care about proprietary file system drivers...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by siride View Post
                    Uhh, you apparently know nothing about NTFS. NTFS is all about security. It has a more complex permission system than the Unix standard, with more than just read/write/execute, but 7 or 8 different permission types and it is all done via cascading ACLs, rather than the simplistic owner/group/everybody model. As a result, permission checking is slower and more complicated than on standard Unix. There is also per-file encryption and compression, which can further slow things down (if used).
                    Interesting. So the filesystem has a bunch of security features that a standard home user install of Windows will never use. If everybody is running an Admin account, then what's the point of permissions.

                    Maybe these features are actually used in an enterprise environment.

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