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Linux 3.0 Kernel May Remove Some Old Cruft

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  • #11
    Originally posted by pvtcupcakes View Post
    Either way, version numbers shouldn't be about features. This is what Linus has been saying since 2.6 was released. I don't think there should be a goal for the kernel to reach 3.0. If Linus wants to call 2.6.40 version 3.0 then that's good enough. 3.0 doesn't have to be special.
    Its not about features, its about the evolution of features. In a kernel series, you're pretty much doing add-add-add-add, so the new features keep piling on. You can generally expect forward compatibility. This would mark a new kernel that is not 100% forward compatible from 2.6. Go with the big number jump to denote this fact.

    Similarly, you can't always expect any 2.6 kernel to be a drop in replacement for a 2.4, 2.2, or 1.x. You *can* expect a 2.6.y kernel to be virtually a drop in replacement for 2.6.x where y>x though. See what I'm getting at?

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    • #12
      I've always been frustrated that I need stuff from drivers/scsi to get my sata hard drives to work.

      Also, as far as I know, a lot of hardware, like sensors, still uses ISA.

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      • #13
        ISA still useed there too, don't remove!

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        • #14
          Originally posted by pvtcupcakes View Post
          Either way, version numbers shouldn't be about features. This is what Linus has been saying since 2.6 was released. I don't think there should be a goal for the kernel to reach 3.0. If Linus wants to call 2.6.40 version 3.0 then that's good enough. 3.0 doesn't have to be special.
          Who Cares? I really don't get why people are so wrapped up in version numbers these days...

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          • #15
            Originally posted by roland View Post
            I've always been frustrated that I need stuff from drivers/scsi to get my sata hard drives to work.

            Also, as far as I know, a lot of hardware, like sensors, still uses ISA.
            That's because of the driver model that makes IDE/SATA drives appear like SCSI devices

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            • #16
              clean old stuff

              if you need ancient hardware, use linux 2.6
              for modern use 3.0

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              • #17
                Originally posted by RavFX View Post
                ISA still useed there too, don't remove!
                If you use it, and want to continue doing so, you might want to make your case on the LKML.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                  That's because of the driver model that makes IDE/SATA drives appear like SCSI devices
                  I get that, but it's a fundamental change I'd like to see. Lets call things as they are. make nconfig is pretty enormous as it is.

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                  • #19
                    So I guess Pentium 3, and Athlon systems are now too old since many of those motherboards included ISA expansions slots.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by rapsure View Post
                      So I guess Pentium 3, and Athlon systems are now too old since many of those motherboards included ISA expansions slots.
                      Modern motherboards use an ISA bus for small devices like sensors even though they do not have a physical slot.

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industr...embedded_chips
                      Last edited by roland; 05-24-2011, 04:16 PM. Reason: got a nice link

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