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What Was Said About EXT4 In Australia

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  • What Was Said About EXT4 In Australia

    Phoronix: What Was Said About EXT4 In Australia

    Besides the Linux graphics stack being talked about this week at Linux.Conf.Au, there was also a talk by Ted Ts'o about the EXT4 file-system...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTA2MQ

  • #2
    One thing that really annoys me about EXT is the use of a percentage (5% IIRC) to reserve for root by default. Gets rather annoying when you are talking 100+ GB volumes.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by deanjo View Post
      One thing that really annoys me about EXT is the use of a percentage (5% IIRC) to reserve for root by default. Gets rather annoying when you are talking 100+ GB volumes.
      This is easily changeable during the creation process, and tweakable after the fact. The only thing standing in your way is having to unmount the filesystem to use tune2fs.

      mkfs.ext4 -m 0
      tune2fs -m 0

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      • #4
        The feature I wish had gone into ext4 is tail packing. I believe it may be the lack of this is one of the major causes of its relatively poor performance with lots of small files (e.g. the pacman package database).

        I guess I'll just have to wait of btrfs to stabilize. It has a lot of features I'm very enthusiastic about anyhow.

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        • #5
          Defragmenter is being worked on for how long? Beside that it should defragment automagically.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by edgan View Post
            This is easily changeable during the creation process, and tweakable after the fact. The only thing standing in your way is having to unmount the filesystem to use tune2fs.

            mkfs.ext4 -m 0
            tune2fs -m 0
            I realize that it is tweakable that is why I said "by default". It is just an extremely unreasonable default nowdays when we are dealing with huge volume size. It is as badly outdated as the "swap space should be double your ram" rule of thumb.

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            • #7
              To further expand on the "reserved for root" take an everyday 1 TB harddrive which are common as heck nowdays, that means by default it is going to reserve 50 Gigabytes and even setting it to one percent there is still an absurdly large amount of space used, 10 gigabytes when realistically a reserve capacity of 1 GB is still overkill. So you have either reserved 10 Gig minimum or none at all if you set it to 0%. You should be able to specify that size by an actual reserved size number instead of by percentage.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by deanjo View Post
                To further expand on the "reserved for root" take an everyday 1 TB harddrive which are common as heck nowdays, that means by default it is going to reserve 50 Gigabytes and even setting it to one percent there is still an absurdly large amount of space used, 10 gigabytes when realistically a reserve capacity of 1 GB is still overkill. So you have either reserved 10 Gig minimum or none at all if you set it to 0%. You should be able to specify that size by an actual reserved size number instead of by percentage.
                You may set the reserved blocks with "tune2fs -r" and reserve whatever size you want.
                However I agree that the default value should be tweaked.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by edgan View Post
                  This is easily changeable during the creation process, and tweakable after the fact. The only thing standing in your way is having to unmount the filesystem to use tune2fs.

                  mkfs.ext4 -m 0
                  tune2fs -m 0
                  Actually, you don't even have to unmount

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                  • #10
                    Oh come on, can't you at least summarize the video?

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