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Zfs for mainstream linux finally!

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  • Zfs for mainstream linux finally!

    As we all know, ZFS is by far the best file system.

    People have workarounds and solutions which are kind of 2nd tone replacements to work on Linux, but either ways, all these solutions are not really good replacements as they either are not stable enough or lack some of the salient features of ZFS.

    KQ has ported ZFS to Linux and was a much awaited release since January 2010.

    We are releasing the closed beta in last week of August/first week of september and are looking for closed beta customers who can test it for free on some environments.

    Mail me at darshin@kqinfotech.com to register.

    Feel free to put forward any questions as well.



    Kind Regards,

    Darshin

  • #2
    Originally posted by darshin View Post
    As we all know, ZFS is by far the best file system.
    That sets the tone.

    Originally posted by darshin View Post
    Feel free to put forward any questions as well.
    Here's one: do you realize this is the Open-Source AMD/ATI Linux forum?

    Comment


    • #3
      It's a spam bot, ignore it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Long awaited? LOL.

        Love those spambots.... http://zfs-fuse.net/
        And it comes with source.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah.

          Firstly, am not a spammer.

          Secondly, I do realize that its AMD / ATI Linux forum.

          My motto, at the end of the day, is to let you ppl know that we have come up with the ZFS port on linux and its successfully working. Also, we are looking forward to ppl who can help us test the closed beta.

          does it matter which TV are you actually watching an AD on, or is it a hand held PDA or your iphone or a blackberry on which an sms on which an information is flashed.

          Dude, any guy who works as a sysadmin / storage admin, comes across this post on the website, he will know the value of it.

          And yeah, @droidhacker, dude, dont laugh over long awaited. We are not working on the FUSE version, thats the difference. People like you who have little knowledge of what I am really talking about, wont ever understand it.

          FUSE thing is a totally different world of talks and doesnt even belong to what am talking about. Thats why its long awaited.

          I know i pasted the thread in a forum where I was going to come across ppl with superficial, little or absolutely no knowledge on what am talking about, but am hopeful that this forum will also have some well evolved user.

          Cheers,
          Darshin

          Comment


          • #6
            @droidhacker, @ nanonyme,

            Guys, am not a spammer.

            Secondly, specially you @ droidhacker, do you even understand what am talking about ??

            FUSE is crap and the solution we have developed is not in FUSE.

            Thats why its long awaited, am not just bullshitting here, a lot of storage companies are keenly looking forward to this solution and only if you are related to the storage industry, will you know the real gem ZFS is! Nothing to laugh on ZFS being the best file system, hell it is! ! !

            I know there are a lot of people here on board who barely understand what I have written and are still here to comment on it, but am equally hopeful that people who really understand the term and terminology wont be taking this lightly.

            I know what this forum is about and what it belongs to, but I also know that a lot of guys who are involved with ZFS & Linux technologies are members of this forum and am actually wanting them to be involved in the discussion.

            Darshin

            Comment


            • #7
              http://kerneltrap.org/node/8066#comment-251093 The patents are now held by Oracle and unless Oracle gives another announcement, nothing has changed as far as Linux kernel is considered. If you have a GPL implementation and implemented the patented things without Oracle's permission, they can and probably will sue you.

              Comment


              • #8
                FYI, we have already taken these things under consideration and proceeded dude! Its not the work of an individual who has blindly proceeded into this space without checking these future hurdles. We have taken every aspect into consideration and only then going ahead with this.

                Also, before Oracle can sue us, its already sued by Netapp for ZFS > ..haha....

                Anyways, let the bigheads battle it out on issues that dont bother us.

                Also, FYI, we are coming up with yet another innovation in the file system field, cant let it out here, cause thats going to b something really innovative. Again on Linux.

                Anyways, yeah, coming back to your point, all those aspects are into consideration, something beyond a point cant be let out here. But yeah, we are well aware of the things u've already mentioned and not even in our wildest dreams can Oracle sue us for what we have come up with.

                Cheers,
                Darshin

                Comment


                • #9
                  darshin: I will test it if you send me the patches or info to michael [at] phoronix.com.
                  Michael Larabel
                  http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Michael View Post
                    darshin: I will test it if you send me the patches or info to michael [at] phoronix.com.
                    Thanks Mike. I would be sending you the info. Please check your email in about couple of hours.

                    Cheers,
                    Darshin

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
                      http://kerneltrap.org/node/8066#comment-251093 The patents are now held by Oracle and unless Oracle gives another announcement, nothing has changed as far as Linux kernel is considered. If you have a GPL implementation and implemented the patented things without Oracle's permission, they can and probably will sue you.
                      It sounds like this is a continuation of this work:
                      http://github.com/behlendorf/zfs/wiki

                      They get around the CDDL problem by not distributing ZFS in the kernel. You have to download and build the kernel module separately. Their modifications to ZFS remain under the CDDL licence.

                      They mention that KQ Infotech are working on the ZFS posix layer here:
                      http://github.com/behlendorf/zfs/wiki/Example-ZPL

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jyxent View Post
                        It sounds like this is a continuation of this work:
                        http://github.com/behlendorf/zfs/wiki

                        They get around the CDDL problem by not distributing ZFS in the kernel. You have to download and build the kernel module separately. Their modifications to ZFS remain under the CDDL licence.

                        They mention that KQ Infotech are working on the ZFS posix layer here:
                        http://github.com/behlendorf/zfs/wiki/Example-ZPL
                        As a Debian user, I can see why ZFS is not in mainline Debian due to the restrictions of the CDDL and the fact that Oracle/Sun own the patents. As no one knows how oracle will react when people are putting out implementations of ZFS, it is best to tread carefully with this one.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                          . As no one knows how oracle will react when people are putting out implementations of ZFS, it is best to tread carefully with this one.
                          My guess is they will react as well as they did with Google's Java implementation.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jyxent View Post
                            They get around the CDDL problem by not distributing ZFS in the kernel. You have to download and build the kernel module separately. Their modifications to ZFS remain under the CDDL licence.
                            Right, if it is based on the CDDL-licensed ZFS and is also licensed under CDDL, probably somewhat safe. As much as you can rely on CDDL anyhow. Wouldn't personally use it without relying on a personal/company lawyer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              "But we believe the way to get around this issue is to build ZFS as a module with a CDDL license, it can still be loaded in the Linux kernel. Though it would be restricted to use the non- GPL symbols, but as long as that rule is adhered to there is no problem of legal issues." Yes, this is a theory that the proprietary drivers are based on too. Afaik it has never been tested in court though.

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