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Linux 2.6.30 Kernel Benchmarks

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  • Linux 2.6.30 Kernel Benchmarks

    Phoronix: Linux 2.6.30 Kernel Benchmarks

    With the Linux 2.6.30 kernel being prepped for release in early June, we have set out to provide a few benchmarks of this latest Linux kernel to see how it compares to its two earlier predecessors. While this new kernel may offer support for new file-systems (NILFS2, in particular), support for LZMA/BZIP2 kernel image compression, a new CPU architecture (Microblaze) and many other changes, are there any major performance regressions or improvements like we have spotted with our previous Linux kernel benchmarks?

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=13891

  • #2
    The 4GB write performance is really interesting, but why this 7z compression regression?

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    • #3
      It would be really interesting if some kernel developers looked at the regressions and bisected them.

      Hell, I might even do it myself if I find the time this weekend.

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      • #4
        It would add a lot to the article if you could at least attempt to explain the instances where there are large performance changes.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Apopas View Post
          why this 7z compression regression?
          because the kernel is getting fat

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          • #6
            So? fat ones are beautiful

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            • #7
              I have been running this kernel for a few days on Ubuntu Intrepid and it 'feels' faster than 2.6.28 from a desktop usage standpoint.

              My main drive is encrypted, so maybe I am just seeing performance improvements similar to GnuPG benchmark, but either way I like it.

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              • #8
                These test should be done with 64bit too. On gentoo, we found 2.6.30 over 600% faster in most intensive I/O load (like decompression). A 3 years old (introduced in 2.6.16) regression have been fixed.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Elv13 View Post
                  These test should be done with 64bit too. On gentoo, we found 2.6.30 over 600% faster in most intensive I/O load (like decompression). A 3 years old (introduced in 2.6.16) regression have been fixed.
                  I believe that the first page of the article mentioned that the testing was performed using Ubuntu 9.04 x86-64.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Elv13 View Post
                    These test should be done with 64bit too. On gentoo, we found 2.6.30 over 600% faster in most intensive I/O load (like decompression). A 3 years old (introduced in 2.6.16) regression have been fixed.
                    From the article:

                    With the Linux 2.6.28, 2.6.29, and 2.6.30-rc7 kernels we obtained the x86_64 vanilla kernels from the Ubuntu mainline kernel PPA.
                    Michael Larabel
                    http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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