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Linux 2.6.29-rc1 Kernel Released

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  • Linux 2.6.29-rc1 Kernel Released

    Phoronix: Linux 2.6.29-rc1 Kernel Released

    The first release candidate for the Linux 2.6.29 kernel is now available. The Linux 2.6.29 kernel features kernel mode-setting support (only on Intel hardware, currently), the Btrfs file-system, and a number of new drivers and updates to others...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=Njk4NA

  • #2
    Filesystem snapshots

    What the release announcement misses is that filesystem freeze is getting implemented for some filesystems, I spotted xfs and ext3 already. Filesystem freeze is the first step to allow snapshots, and it seems that this is the exact reason they're implementing filesystem freeze. Can't wait to be able to do snapshots of ext3 partitions that are online!

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    • #3
      Mmmm... Squash 4.0

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      • #4
        finally, squashfs in-kernel :]

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        • #5
          Yes, it is great that SquashFS has finally found its way into the kernel. Too bad that the bzip2 and lzma patches were rejected, but still.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by chithanh View Post
            Yes, it is great that SquashFS has finally found its way into the kernel. Too bad that the bzip2 and lzma patches were rejected, but still.
            Those *might* make it into another kernel release, so don't fret...

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            • #7
              You know how extra slow LZMA is? It would be great for packing the ati driver (about 50% smaller possible) but usually you need ages to create it and gain only 10% or less more space.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Kano View Post
                You know how extra slow LZMA is? It would be great for packing the ati driver (about 50% smaller possible) but usually you need ages to create it and gain only 10% or less more space.
                Indeed it is dog slow, but two things. One, it does give a choice , and second as they say, for do_it_seldom_and_forget_it stuff like livecds .

                However, personally as I have bigger and bigger storage, such computationally intesive compression is not worth my patience.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kano View Post
                  You know how extra slow LZMA is?
                  It is slow during compression but, depending on your use case that could still be acceptable and outweighed by the better compression ratio. Think distribution packages, which need to be created only once and then mirrored, downloaded and installed many times. Or live cds as was pointed out by hdas.

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                  • #10
                    I create myself live images, you must really love waisting time

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                    • #11
                      Even decompressing LZMA hurts a lot. When testing a livecd in Qemu, that had a 10mb initramfs (gzipped), it was extracted in about 3 secs. When testing the same, but lzma packed, it was ~6.5mb, but decompression took over a minute.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kano
                        I create myself live images, you must really love waisting time
                        Originally posted by curaga
                        Even decompressing LZMA hurts a lot. When testing a livecd in Qemu, that had a 10mb initramfs (gzipped), it was extracted in about 3 secs. When testing the same, but lzma packed, it was ~6.5mb, but decompression took over a minute.
                        @ Kano: I create live images too, but not as fancy as sidux . And trust me, I don't like wasting time too. For some numbers, my filesystem is about 6gb (reiserfs) and it compresses it to about 2gb using regular squashfs in 20 minutes. It takes nearly 2hrs using squashfs+lzma and does it to 1.6gb. So I stick to plain squashfs. Although a choice is still good - like when I am desperate to fit it to a 2gb flash drive .

                        Aside, if you have some spare bandwidth, you may check out my livedvd from here:
                        http://hirakendu.mooo.com/gentoo/neo...e-20081227.iso
                        (Its a gentoo 2007.0 live-dvd and is getting old. Some stuff like kernel, drivers, internet and multimedia are up to date though. Waiting for kde 4.3 to do my next emerge .)

                        @curaga and Kano : Indeed decompressing hurts too. Its not slow, but it kills the cpu. Especially live-dvds created with 128kB blocksize literally stutter on a mid-range machine.

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