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Btrfs Merged Into Mainline Linux Kernel

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  • Btrfs Merged Into Mainline Linux Kernel

    Phoronix: Btrfs Merged Into Mainline Linux Kernel

    Btrfs, the next-generation Linux file-system conceived by Oracle and designed to compete with some of the features found in Sun's ZFS file-system, has just been merged for the Linux 2.6.29 kernel. Last week we shared that Btrfs was getting ready for the mainline kernel and since then Chris Mason and other kernel hackers have committed several commits to the btrfs-unstable tree. There have been 21 commits to this new open-source file-system in the past four days. This morning Linus Torvalds finally pulled Btrfs into the mainline kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=Njk4Mw

  • #2
    For me, 2.6.29 will be the feature wize coolest kernel to date.

    2.6.30 will likely be the coolest kernel bug fix wize

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    • #3
      So, will it be functional or is it purely for testing still?

      Comment


      • #4
        It would be interesting to see SSD benchmarks with the following:

        ext3
        ext4
        btrfs
        btrfs (SSD mode)

        Does anyone know whether the SSD mode is already implemented and whether it will detect your SSD automatically and enable the optimized mode?

        Comment


        • #5
          Sweet!!! I am after doing a new server build (present only has a single harddrive) and I /really/ want to try this out

          having two HDD in mirrored RAID with a BTRFS should be sweet!!!

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          • #6
            Btrfs phenomenally BAD according to benchmarks

            The benchmarks linked in the Btrfs home page show that Btrfs is phenominally BAD compared to pretty much any other Linux filesystem. For example, look at the Single Disk Mail Server Simulation with one thread: Btrfs is eleven times (1100%) less efficient than EXT4. The second worse filesystem after Btrfs is JFS, and even it is 9X more efficient than Btrfs.

            Upgrading to Btrfs will mean a sure slowdown for the vast majority of Linux users unless Oracle devs have a miracle up their sleeves.

            ZFS, on the other hand, is both faster than EXT4 and more featureful. Can't beat that.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by joffe View Post
              So, will it be functional or is it purely for testing still?
              That's something I've been wondering myself.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by stan View Post
                The benchmarks linked in the Btrfs home page show that Btrfs is phenominally BAD compared to pretty much any other Linux filesystem. For example, look at the Single Disk Mail Server Simulation with one thread: Btrfs is eleven times (1100%) less efficient than EXT4. The second worse filesystem after Btrfs is JFS, and even it is 9X more efficient than Btrfs.

                Upgrading to Btrfs will mean a sure slowdown for the vast majority of Linux users unless Oracle devs have a miracle up their sleeves.

                ZFS, on the other hand, is both faster than EXT4 and more featureful. Can't beat that.
                You really can't compare a filesystem that still has a lot of debugging code in it. Besides those results are fairly old right now and the last couple months have been about optimization of it in the recent commits.

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                • #9
                  Well does GRUB(2) support it already? Thats whats needed to use it without boot partition (a very stupid thing to use).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by d2kx View Post
                    It would be interesting to see SSD benchmarks with the following:

                    ext3
                    ext4
                    btrfs
                    btrfs (SSD mode)

                    Does anyone know whether the SSD mode is already implemented and whether it will detect your SSD automatically and enable the optimized mode?
                    I imagine this would be done using a script to change the mount option in fstab

                    Comment

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