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Linux 2.6.28 Kernel Released

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  • #21
    I've noticed something with 2.6.28 that didn't happen since quite some time: The mouse cursor in X becomes skippy/jumpy when there's heavy system load (doing a "make -j5" in /usr/src/linux for example). Anyone else seeing this? Cursor was always smooth as silk before.

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    • #22
      What type of mouse are you using. I had to replace my Razer Deathadder because the mouse would get jumpy when I was in WoW. But this was under the 2.6.25 kernel.

      I would try a different mouse to make sure its not a hardware issue if you haven't already.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by RealNC View Post
        I've noticed something with 2.6.28 that didn't happen since quite some time: The mouse cursor in X becomes skippy/jumpy when there's heavy system load (doing a "make -j5" in /usr/src/linux for example). Anyone else seeing this? Cursor was always smooth as silk before.
        I regularly experience skippy mouse movements on:
        • swap space/file usage
        • heavy storage I/O, on machines with IDE chipset which require CPU intervention (Intel U100, my notebook is a Thinkpad A30)
        • heavy USB I/O, as the USB specification doesn't include DMA (remember me, what does Intel sells, again? )

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        • #24
          Never had this with 2.6.26/27. It's not a big problem though. The mouse is a USB Microsoft IntelliMouse. Using evdev driver. Normally I would boot 2.6.27 again to check if it's something else at fault, but now that I went ext4, I can't.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by RealNC View Post
            I've noticed something with 2.6.28 that didn't happen since quite some time: The mouse cursor in X becomes skippy/jumpy when there's heavy system load (doing a "make -j5" in /usr/src/linux for example). Anyone else seeing this? Cursor was always smooth as silk before.
            I noticed something like that too. Just after I upgraded to Jaunty Alpha 2. Mouse cursor started to behave oddly when passing over some links on Firefox.

            I thought it was probably something related to new X.org libs.

            My Mouse is a A4Tech 8 buttons, using evdev too.

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            • #26
              So wait, is 5% of the ext2 partition on my flash drive 'reserved for root'?

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              • #27
                Originally posted by ethana2 View Post
                So wait, is 5% of the ext2 partition on my flash drive 'reserved for root'?
                If you didn't specify different options than the default, then yes, 5% of that filesystem space is reserved for usage by UID 0 (root user).

                To find out how much space is currently reserved on your filesystem, try this several steps:

                The total number of blocks in your filesystem is:
                Code:
                # dumpe2fs /dev/$your_partition_device_file | grep 'Block count'
                Each block is by default 4 Kilobytes (4096 bytes), to find out your block size:
                Code:
                # dumpe2fs /dev/$your_partition_device_file | grep 'Block size'
                The number of currently reserved blocks is:
                Code:
                # dumpe2fs /dev/$your_partition_device_file | grep 'Reserved block count'
                The UID (user ID) of the user who the space is reserved for is:
                Code:
                # dumpe2fs /dev/$your_partition_device_file | grep 'Reserved blocks uid'
                The GID (group ID) of the group which the space is reserved for is:
                Code:
                # dumpe2fs /dev/$your_partition_device_file | grep 'Reserved blocks gid'
                At anytime you can assign the reserved space to a different UID, or set 0 reserved blocks if you'd like none.

                To change reserved space UID:
                Code:
                # tune2fs -u $new_uid /dev/$your_partition_device_file
                To change reserved space GID:
                Code:
                # tune2fs -g $new_gid /dev/$your_partition_device_file
                To change reserved space block number:
                Code:
                # tune2fs -r $new_reserved_block_number /dev/$your_partition_device_file
                Last edited by Loris; 12-28-2008, 08:11 AM.

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