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Creative Gives In, They Open-Source Their X-Fi Driver

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  • Creative Gives In, They Open-Source Their X-Fi Driver

    Phoronix: Creative Gives In, They Open-Source Their X-Fi Driver

    The Sound Blaster X-Fi sound card driver for Linux from Creative Labs was awful. That's simply the nicest way to put it. The driver was home to many bugs, initially only supported 64-bit Linux, and it was arriving extremely late. The open-source drivers supporting the Creative X-Fi drivers have also been at a stand still. However, Creative Labs today has finally turned this situation around and they have open-sourced the code to this notorious driver. The source-code for the Creative X-Fi driver is now licensed under the GNU GPLv2.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=13083

  • #2
    As you English native speaker say: Hell is frozen over!
    Now the other 3 nearly impossible launches are waiting:
    UT3,DNF, Steam.

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    • #3
      Finally !!!

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      • #4
        we're all better off sticking with the oxygen powered sound cards.

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        • #5
          OMG! Finally i can install eg. Ubuntu to my Game-PC...

          Hope this will go quickly to ALSA...

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          • #6
            Am I still dreaming? Creative for the win! (finally)

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            • #7
              Are there ANY information if they will release specs, or whatever, for the I/O Modules?

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              • #8
                Creative's not making money anyway, so they don't have much to lose. At least this makes their fanboys happy. I can't believe how many Linux users own X-fi's, considering how horrible the support is, but apparently some people are happy making ill-informed purchases and being brand slaves.

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                • #9
                  I wish I hadn't bought this stupid soundcard two years ago. I did know it was supposed to be a linux machine, but since I had such good experiences with linux hardware support, I figured I wouldn't have any problems.

                  So of course I buy an ATI graphics card and a Creative X-Fi.... oh brother.

                  Things have finally shaped up though. I now have 100% open source drivers running on my system.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DanL View Post
                    Creative's not making money anyway, so they don't have much to lose. At least this makes their fanboys happy. I can't believe how many Linux users own X-fi's, considering how horrible the support is, but apparently some people are happy making ill-informed purchases and being brand slaves.
                    Come on, everbody has a litte masochist inside himself

                    Well, I do not own a X-Fi but back in early 2004 I was impressed by the Audigy2 cards. Today I think a onboard card, like an ALC888, is sufficient. X-Fi makes sense if you are a (hardcore)gamer under Windows.

                    But I still love those I/O hubs ^^

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                    • #11
                      One thing the previous Creative cards were always good for was budget music production, using the kX drivers in windows and as10k1 and other tools on Linux. The simple EMU10k1 DSP was easy to program in 10k1 assembly. I still have a Live 5.1 in my system because of that. If the X-fi DSP can be similarly programmed (and if it can do hardware 3D then it probably can), then Creative might become interesting on Linux once again.

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                      • #12
                        This driver works well in 2.6.27 on an Auzentech Prelude, and supports hardware mixing and resampling of multiple sound sources just like the 10k1 chips do. SPDIF I/O works as well.

                        Of note, 24 bit output spits out garbage fuzzy sound. I'm sure once Takashi takes a crack at this driver any bugs will be fixed in no time.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by izual View Post
                          Come on, everbody has a litte masochist inside himself

                          Well, I do not own a X-Fi but back in early 2004 I was impressed by the Audigy2 cards. Today I think a onboard card, like an ALC888, is sufficient. X-Fi makes sense if you are a (hardcore)gamer under Windows.

                          But I still love those I/O hubs ^^
                          The ALC888 is a good chip but a properly working Xfi sounds far better and has no interference from the MOBO. So saying it only makes sense for games is really not true.

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                          • #14
                            Nice in multiple ways

                            It's good to see yet another company open source a driver. I think the phoronix article doesn't really make clear how important it is for users to have open source drivers, and thus how good it is of creative to have open sourced this one.

                            Just today I was looking at X58 motherboards, when I came upon the MSI Eclipse SLI. That really seems to be an amazing motherboard, and it comes with an X-Fi on-board. It does use a card for the connectors (looks like PCIe-x1), but it seemed like the chip was on the motherboard itself. I was thinking about what a waste it would be to buy it just because of the soundcard. I also tend to forget that I don't really need a sound-card, because I have Logitech Z-10 speakers which are connected via USB. However in the future I might need a second sound output (doesn't really matter how, just that I can control it seperately) and I don't like having unsupported hardware at all, so this is definately a good thing...
                            Regards,

                            Michael

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                            • #15
                              Creative was the Largest Hold-out Hardware Vendor until this announcement, who will take their place?

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