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Fedora 7 to 10 Benchmarks

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  • Fedora 7 to 10 Benchmarks

    Phoronix: Fedora 7 to 10 Benchmarks

    Earlier this week we published benchmarks of all Ubuntu releases from 7.04 to the release candidate and had found the performance degraded with time, at least with the test system we used. As part of our testing to explore this issue, we had repeated many of the same tests on Fedora with all of their releases going back to Fedora 7. Has Fedora's desktop performance degraded too? Read the article to find out.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=13046

  • #2
    Hot damn! Ubuntu 7.04 and 7.10 had some secret sauce. They were 2x faster than any other Fedora or Ubuntu made since.
    Did they forget to `apt-get install secretsauce' in newer versions of Ubuntu?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sacha View Post
      Hot damn! Ubuntu 7.04 and 7.10 had some secret sauce. They were 2x faster than any other Fedora or Ubuntu made since.
      Did they forget to `apt-get install secretsauce' in newer versions of Ubuntu?

      This is indeed very very strange. Now I'm really interested in two things:
      1. What is the secret sauce?
      2. How did the other distro's do compared to 7.04 (e.g. Suse)?

      until then:
      the sauce is a lie
      the sauce is a lie
      the sauce is a lie
      Last edited by MaestroMaus; 10-31-2008, 04:42 AM.

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      • #4
        What's wrong with audio encoding?? The Ubuntu 7.04 and 7.10 packages have SSE2/3/4 optimization enabled?

        Such a loss of speed is very important, it sound like a major bug.

        Can you do the same tests with the 64bit kernel (perhaps more optimization for newer processor than the 386 one)

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        • #5
          Maybe you should test the 64-bit systems, too, as they use other compiler flags - the "wav to mp3" test took 34s on a 2.6 Ghz Intel - 16s, the ogg one. Both on Fedora 9.

          Ubuntu 7.06/7.10 has some incredible results.

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          • #6
            Pretty weird indeed for Ubuntu 7.04/7.10 did better than all the Fedora releases and the Ubuntu 8.04 and the 8.10RC

            There has had to be some sort of optimization set in the Ubuntu 7.x releases...

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            • #7
              no offense michael, but those 7.04 test results look quite fishy to me. should a speed regression, that heavy, pass mostly unnoticed?

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              • #8
                Or the T60 in the test has some serious hardware problems. My Thinkpad R31 (P-3 1GHz, 512MB, Ubuntu 8.10) is only slightly slower than the T60 :

                Code:
                       R31         T60
                LAME  133.07s    120.83s
                OGG   84.40s     69.81s
                FLAC  62.13s     56.19s
                Link to the complete results of the audio-encoding suite for my R31 :

                http://global.phoronix-test-suite.co...14-14176-26881

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                • #9
                  What where the file systems used in the tests? Also what mount option did the have?

                  The tests with Ubuntu 7.04 are odd. Those packages have something different.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by KDesk View Post
                    What where the file systems used in the tests? Also what mount option did the have?
                    Everything was left at their defaults.
                    Michael Larabel
                    http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                    • #11
                      I just discovered what might have caused the performance change from Ubuntu 7.04. I think its Gnome 2. In 7.04, gnome was 1.8 and it was very fast and responsive and only slightly heavier than Xfce (if I replaced Nautilus with PCManFM). But now its a bloat.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MetalheadGautham View Post
                        I just discovered what might have caused the performance change from Ubuntu 7.04. I think its Gnome 2. In 7.04, gnome was 1.8 and it was very fast and responsive and only slightly heavier than Xfce (if I replaced Nautilus with PCManFM). But now its a bloat.
                        Per this link:
                        http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/releasenotes/704tour
                        Gnome was version 2.18.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by KDesk View Post
                          What where the file systems used in the tests? Also what mount option did the have?

                          The tests with Ubuntu 7.04 are odd. Those packages have something different.
                          No the tests for 7.04 are okay. My Dell Latitude D505 is only slightly slower then the Lenovo T60 and gets roughly the same numbers for Ubuntu 8.10. But compared to the tests Michael did for Ubuntu 8.10, my D505 (P-Mobile 1.7GHz) scored 40% better than his T60, although my notebook should have higher runtimes for the tests (Singe Core vs. Dual Core, 1.7GHz vs. 1.87GHz).

                          So something must got terribly wrong with Michael's Notebook, because all tests after 7.04 are too slow for this kind of hardware. Just take a look in the database, search for comparable hardware and look for the numbers.

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                          • #14
                            Reproduce

                            Michael, can you reproduce the 7.04/10 scores on that laptop?

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                            • #15
                              smp problems?

                              In the tests that support multithreading, what was the cpu usage? The low scores seem to crop up mostly with purely computational benchmarks.

                              The sequential ram read however, is inexplicable. Unless the kernel turns off dual channel in all but ubuntu 7.04 (for some weird reason). On modern intel machines this can lead to substantial performance differences in synthetic benchmarks (when mostly cached reads are used, for instance).

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